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The Holocaust Sites Of Europe

Author: Martin Winstone
Publisher: I.B.Tauris
ISBN: 0857730282
Size: 26.59 MB
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The Holocaust - the murder of approximately six million Jews by Nazi Germany and its collaborators in World War Two - is the gravest crime in recorded history, committed on a human and geographical scale which is almost unimaginable. To try to bridge this gap and better understand the true significance of the Holocaust, as well as its scale and magnitude, millions of people each year now travel to the former camps, ghettos and other settings for the atrocities. The Holocaust Sites of Europe offers the first comprehensive guide to these sites, including much practical information as well as the historical context. It will be an indispensable guide for anyone seeking to add another layer to their understanding of the Holocaust by visiting these important sites for themselves. Thousands of locations across Europe were associated with the tragedy but, with a few well known exceptions, most languished in obscurity after the war, their names known only to survivors, perpetrators and a small number of historians. For over four decades the Iron Curtain served as a practical and psychological barrier to travel to the majority of the most significant sites. But now millions of people from all over the world are choosing to travel to Holocaust sites, whether for educational or familial reasons or simply out of respect for the dead. This guide includes a survey of all the major Holocaust sites in Europe, from Belgium and Belarus to Serbia and Ukraine. It includes not only the notorious concentration and death camps, such as Auschwitz and Ravensbrück, but also less well known examples, such as Sered' in Slovakia, together with detailed descriptions of massacre sites, ghettos, ‘Euthanasia’ centres and Roma and Sinti sites which witnessed similar crimes. Throughout the book there is also extensive reference to the many museums and memorials which commemorate the Holocaust. As the experience of the Holocaust recedes from living memory and the number of survivors (and perpetrators) diminishes with every passing year, these locations assume a greater importance as the principal physical reminders of what happened. Alongside the testimonies of survivors and the works of historians, the experience of, for example, exploring the vast ruins of Birkenau, or being shocked by the small area needed to kill nearly one million people at Treblinka, can bring another dimension to one’s understanding. The Holocaust Sites of Europe is a thoughtful and fitting guide to some of the most traumatic sites in Europe and will be an invaluable companion for everyone who wants to honour the victims and to understand more about their fate.

Holocaust Literature

Author: David G. Roskies
Publisher: UPNE
ISBN: 1611683599
Size: 13.13 MB
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A comprehensive assessment of Holocaust literature, from World War II to the present day

Concentration Camps

Author: Marc Terrance
Publisher: Universal-Publishers
ISBN: 1581128398
Size: 34.75 MB
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A Must for anyone planning on visiting the Concentration Camps of Europe. Contains street maps showing exact directions to the sites, walking routes, road signs, bus and train information, opening hours and what remains of the camps today. Includes 45 Street Maps Over 160 Pictures Plus...many useful Websites

Holocaust Journey

Author: Martin Gilbert
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 9780231109642
Size: 67.12 MB
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Documents the journey of a holocaust historian and his class of graduate students as they visited the sites of atrocities against Jews during the Holocaust

Jewish Heritage Travel

Author: Ruth Ellen Gruber
Publisher: National Geographic Books
ISBN: 9781426200465
Size: 56.85 MB
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Thoroughly expanded and updated, a unique travel guide to various locales throughout Eastern Europe reviews the Jewish experience in Poland, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary, Romania, the former Yugoslavia, and Bulgaria, as well as new sections on Austria, Ukraine, and Lithuania, with information on Jewish communities, historical sites, hotels, and restaurants. Original.

The Columbia Guide To The Holocaust

Author: Donald L. Niewyk
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 9780231112017
Size: 57.78 MB
Format: PDF
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This invaluable resource provides a multidimensional survey of the Holocaust, essentially integrating five separate books into one comprehensive reference tool: a historical overview; a guide to Holocaust controversies; an A-to-Z encyclopedia of people, places, and terms; a chronology; and a comprehensive resource guide. Whether used separately for their individual merits or approached as an integrated whole, the five sections of this informative volume constitute an indispensable contribution to the study of the Holocaust.

Black Earth

Author: Timothy Snyder
Publisher: Tim Duggan Books
ISBN: 1101903465
Size: 29.39 MB
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A brilliant, haunting, and profoundly original portrait of the defining tragedy of our time. In this epic history of extermination and survival, Timothy Snyder presents a new explanation of the great atrocity of the twentieth century, and reveals the risks that we face in the twenty-first. Based on new sources from eastern Europe and forgotten testimonies from Jewish survivors, Black Earth recounts the mass murder of the Jews as an event that is still close to us, more comprehensible than we would like to think, and thus all the more terrifying. The Holocaust began in a dark but accessible place, in Hitler's mind, with the thought that the elimination of Jews would restore balance to the planet and allow Germans to win the resources they desperately needed. Such a worldview could be realized only if Germany destroyed other states, so Hitler's aim was a colonial war in Europe itself. In the zones of statelessness, almost all Jews died. A few people, the righteous few, aided them, without support from institutions. Much of the new research in this book is devoted to understanding these extraordinary individuals. The almost insurmountable difficulties they faced only confirm the dangers of state destruction and ecological panic. These men and women should be emulated, but in similar circumstances few of us would do so. By overlooking the lessons of the Holocaust, Snyder concludes, we have misunderstood modernity and endangered the future. The early twenty-first century is coming to resemble the early twentieth, as growing preoccupations with food and water accompany ideological challenges to global order. Our world is closer to Hitler's than we like to admit, and saving it requires us to see the Holocaust as it was -- and ourselves as we are. Groundbreaking, authoritative, and utterly absorbing, Black Earth reveals a Holocaust that is not only history but warning.

Where Once We Walked

Author: Gary Mokotoff
Publisher: Bergenfield, NJ : Avotaynu
ISBN: 9781886223158
Size: 64.26 MB
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Gazetteer providing information about more than 23,500 towns in Central and Eastern Europe where Jews lived before the Holocaust.

Why The Germans Why The Jews

Author: Götz Aly
Publisher: Metropolitan Books
ISBN: 080509704X
Size: 28.46 MB
Format: PDF
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A provocative and insightful analysis that sheds new light on one of the most puzzling and historically unsettling conundrums Why the Germans? Why the Jews? Countless historians have grappled with these questions, but few have come up with answers as original and insightful as those of maverick German historian Götz Aly. Tracing the prehistory of the Holocaust from the 1800s to the Nazis' assumption of power in 1933, Aly shows that German anti-Semitism was—to a previously overlooked extent—driven in large part by material concerns, not racist ideology or religious animosity. As Germany made its way through the upheaval of the Industrial Revolution, the difficulties of the lethargic, economically backward German majority stood in marked contrast to the social and economic success of the agile Jewish minority. This success aroused envy and fear among the Gentile population, creating fertile ground for murderous Nazi politics. Surprisingly, and controversially, Aly shows that the roots of the Holocaust are deeply intertwined with German efforts to create greater social equality. Redistributing wealth from the well-off to the less fortunate was in many respects a laudable goal, particularly at a time when many lived in poverty. But as the notion of material equality took over the public imagination, the skilled, well-educated Jewish population came to be seen as having more than its fair share. Aly's account of this fatal social dynamic opens up a new vantage point on the greatest crime in history and is sure to prompt heated debate for years to come.

Jews And Gentiles In Central And Eastern Europe During The Holocaust

Author: Hana Kubátová
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1351668161
Size: 10.17 MB
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Providing diverse insights into Jewish–Gentile relations in East Central Europe from the outbreak of the Second World War until the reestablishment of civic societies after the fall of Communism in the late 1980s, this volume brings together scholars from various disciplines – including history, sociology, political science, cultural studies, film studies and anthropology – to investigate the complexity of these relations, and their transformation, from perspectives beyond the traditional approach that deals purely with politics. This collection thus looks for interactions between the public and private, and what is more, it does so from a still rather rare comparative perspective, both chronological and geographic. It is this interdisciplinary and comparative perspective that enables us to scrutinize the interaction between the individual majority societies and the Jewish minorities in a longer time frame, and hence we are able to revisit complex and manifold encounters between Jews and Gentiles, including but not limited to propaganda, robbery, violence but also help and rescue. In doing so, this collection challenges the representation of these encounters in post-war literature, films, and the historical consciousness. This book was originally published as a special issue of Holocaust Studies.