Download i am a man chief standing bears journey for justice in pdf or read i am a man chief standing bears journey for justice in pdf online books in PDF, EPUB and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to get i am a man chief standing bears journey for justice in pdf book now. This site is like a library, Use search box in the widget to get ebook that you want.



I Am A Man

Author: Joe Starita
Publisher: St. Martin's Press
ISBN: 1429953306
Size: 20.83 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 3061
Download and Read
In 1877, Chief Standing Bear's Ponca Indian tribe was forcibly removed from their Nebraska homeland and marched to what was then known as Indian Territory (now Oklahoma), in what became the tribe's own Trail of Tears. "I Am a Man" chronicles what happened when Standing Bear set off on a six-hundred-mile walk to return the body of his only son to their traditional burial ground. Along the way, it examines the complex relationship between the United States government and the small, peaceful tribe and the legal consequences of land swaps and broken treaties, while never losing sight of the heartbreaking journey the Ponca endured. It is a story of survival---of a people left for dead who arose from the ashes of injustice, disease, neglect, starvation, humiliation, and termination. On another level, it is a story of life and death, despair and fortitude, freedom and patriotism. A story of Christian kindness and bureaucratic evil. And it is a story of hope---of a people still among us today, painstakingly preserving a cultural identity that had sustained them for centuries before their encounter with Lewis and Clark in the fall of 1804. Before it ends, Standing Bear's long journey home also explores fundamental issues of citizenship, constitutional protection, cultural identity, and the nature of democracy---issues that continue to resonate loudly in twenty-first-century America. It is a story that questions whether native sovereignty, tribal-based societies, and cultural survival are compatible with American democracy. Standing Bear successfully used habeas corpus, the only liberty included in the original text of the Constitution, to gain access to a federal court and ultimately his freedom. This account aptly illuminates how the nation's delicate system of checks and balances worked almost exactly as the Founding Fathers envisioned, a system arguably out of whack and under siege today. Joe Starita's well-researched and insightful account reads like historical fiction as his careful characterizations and vivid descriptions bring this piece of American history brilliantly to life.

I Am A Man

Author: Joe Starita
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 9780312533045
Size: 62.88 MB
Format: PDF
View: 765
Download and Read
A portrait of the nineteenth-century Ponca chief and his efforts to reclaim his tribe's lands and rights explores the ways in which the Ponca successfully faced innumerable challenges, from alcoholism to denials of citizenship.

I Am A Man

Author: Joe Starita
Publisher: St. Martin's Griffin
ISBN: 9780312606381
Size: 35.41 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 3282
Download and Read
In 1877, Chief Standing Bear’s Ponca Indian tribe was forcibly removed from their Nebraska homeland and marched to what was then known as Indian Territory (now Oklahoma), in what became the tribe’s own Trail of Tears. “I Am a Man” chronicles what happened when Standing Bear set off on a six-hundred-mile walk to return the body of his only son to their traditional burial ground. Along the way, it examines the complex relationship between the United States government and the small, peaceful tribe and the legal consequences of land swaps and broken treaties, while never losing sight of the heartbreaking journey the Ponca endured. It is a story of survival---of a people left for dead who arose from the ashes of injustice, disease, neglect, starvation, humiliation, and termination. On another level, it is a story of life and death, despair and fortitude, freedom and patriotism. A story of Christian kindness and bureaucratic evil. And it is a story of hope---of a people still among us today, painstakingly preserving a cultural identity that had sustained them for centuries before their encounter with Lewis and Clark in the fall of 1804. Before it ends, Standing Bear’s long journey home also explores fundamental issues of citizenship, constitutional protection, cultural identity, and the nature of democracy---issues that continue to resonate loudly in twenty-first-century America. It is a story that questions whether native sovereignty, tribal-based societies, and cultural survival are compatible with American democracy. Standing Bear successfully used habeas corpus, the only liberty included in the original text of the Constitution, to gain access to a federal court and ultimately his freedom. This account aptly illuminates how the nation’s delicate system of checks and balances worked almost exactly as the Founding Fathers envisioned, a system arguably out of whack and under siege today. Joe Starita’s well-researched and insightful account reads like historical fiction as his careful characterizations and vivid descriptions bring this piece of American history brilliantly to life.

Standing Bear Of The Ponca

Author: Virginia Driving Hawk Sneve
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 0803249489
Size: 18.97 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 2674
Download and Read
For Ages 8 and up Imagine having to argue in court that you are a person. Yet this is just what Standing Bear, of the Ponca Indian tribe, did in Omaha in 1879. And because of this trial, the law finally said that an Indian was indeed a person, with rights just like any other American. Standing Bear of the Ponca tells the story of this historic leader, from his childhood education in the ways and traditions of his people to his trials and triumphs as chief of the Bear Clan of the Ponca tribe. Most harrowing is the winter trek on which Standing Bear led his displaced people, starving and sick with malaria, back to their homeland—only to be arrested by the U.S. government, which set the stage for his famous trial. Standing Bear’s story is also the story of a changing America, when the Ponca, like so many Indian tribes, felt the pressure of pioneers looking to settle the West. Standing Bear died in 1908, but his legacy and influence continue even up to the present.

A Warrior Of The People

Author: Joe Starita
Publisher: St. Martin's Press
ISBN: 1250085357
Size: 61.93 MB
Format: PDF
View: 5180
Download and Read
On March 14, 1889, Susan La Flesche Picotte received her medical degree—becoming the first Native American doctor in U.S. history. She earned her degree thirty-one years before women could vote and thirty-five years before Indians could become citizens in their own country. By age twenty-six, this fragile but indomitable Indian woman became the doctor to her tribe. Overnight, she acquired 1,244 patients scattered across 1,350 square miles of rolling countryside with few roads. Her patients often were desperately poor and desperately sick—tuberculosis, small pox, measles, influenza—families scattered miles apart, whose last hope was a young woman who spoke their language and knew their customs. This is the story of an Indian woman who effectively became the chief of an entrenched patriarchal tribe, the story of a woman who crashed through thick walls of ethnic, racial and gender prejudice, then spent the rest of her life using a unique bicultural identity to improve the lot of her people—physically, emotionally, politically, and spiritually. Joe Starita's A Warrior of the People is the moving biography of Susan La Flesche Picotte’s inspirational life and dedication to public health, and it will finally shine a light on her numerous accomplishments. The author will donate all royalties from this book to a college scholarship fund he has established for Native American high school graduates.

The Dull Knifes Of Pine Ridge

Author:
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 9780803292949
Size: 27.94 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 2257
Download and Read
Joe Starita tells the triumphant and moving story of a Lakota-Northern Cheyenne family. In 1878, the renowned Chief Dull Knife, who fought alongside Crazy Horse, escaped from forced relocation in Indian Territory and led followers on a desperate six-hundred-mile freedom flight back to their homeland. His son, George Dull Knifeøsurvived the Wounded Knee Massacre and later toured in Buffalo Bill Cody's Wild West Show. Guy Dull Knife Sr. fought in World War I and took part in the Siege of Wounded Knee in 1973. Guy Dull Knife Jr. fought in Vietnam and is now an accomplished artist. Starita updates the Dull Knife family history in his new afterword for this Bison Books edition.

Returning To The Lakota Way

Author: Joseph M. Marshall, III
Publisher: Hay House, Inc
ISBN: 1401931782
Size: 37.39 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 6585
Download and Read
Returning to the Lakota Way immerses us once again in the world of the Lakota Sioux through the beautiful storytelling and deep insight of Joseph Marshall’s writing. Relaying traditional tales that have been passed down over generations, Marshall takes us on an inspiring journey that will help us better understand the world around us and our place in it. The teaching stories found in each chapter provide lessons that open our eyes to universal qualities and practices passed down over many generations. From the hunting adventures of the raven and the wolf, we discover the importance of tolerance; the actions of the grasshopper highlight the value of patience; and the experiences of a young man named Walks Alone show us the benefit of silence and turning within. Speaking to these and other traits, such as faith and selflessness, Marshall helps us see our own lives more clearly using time-honored tales interspersed with stories from his own life growing up on the Rosebud Sioux Indian Reservation in South Dakota. In his work, we find a clear example of how the wisdom of the past has relevance and meaning in the world of today.

Local Wonders

Author: Ted Kooser
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 9780803278110
Size: 66.85 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 4106
Download and Read
In the "quietest magnificent book IUve ever read" (Jim Harrison, author of "Legends of the Fall") Ted Kooser describes with exquisite detail and humor the place he calls home in the rolling hills of southeastern Nebraska--an area known as the Bohemian Alps--where nothing is too big or too small for his attention.

Tell Me Grandmother

Author: Virginia J. Sutter
Publisher: Univ Pr of Colorado
ISBN: 9780870817847
Size: 66.68 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 5552
Download and Read
A study of the Arapaho tribe takes the form of the biographies of two Native American women, the author and her great-grandmother, describing the lives and struggles of each as, a century apart, they attempt to make their way in a changing world.

From Cochise To Geronimo

Author: Edwin R. Sweeney
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
ISBN: 0806186518
Size: 75.60 MB
Format: PDF
View: 374
Download and Read
In the decade after the death of their revered chief Cochise in 1874, the Chiricahua Apaches struggled to survive as a people and their relations with the U.S. government further deteriorated. In From Cochise to Geronimo, Edwin R. Sweeney builds on his previous biographies of Chiricahua leaders Cochise and Mangas Coloradas to offer a definitive history of the turbulent period between Cochise's death and Geronimo's surrender in 1886. Sweeney shows that the cataclysmic events of the 1870s and 1880s stemmed in part from seeds of distrust sown by the American military in 1861 and 1863. In 1876 and 1877, the U.S. government proposed moving the Chiricahuas from their ancestral homelands in New Mexico and Arizona to the San Carlos Reservation. Some made the move, but most refused to go or soon fled the reviled new reservation, viewing the government's concentration policy as continued U.S. perfidy. Bands under the leadership of Victorio and Geronimo went south into the Sierra Madre of Mexico, a redoubt from which they conducted bloody raids on American soil. Sweeney draws on American and Mexican archives, some only recently opened, to offer a balanced account of life on and off the reservation in the 1870s and 1880s. From Cochise to Geronimo details the Chiricahuas' ordeal in maintaining their identity despite forced relocations, disease epidemics, sustained warfare, and confinement. Resigned to accommodation with Americans but intent on preserving their culture, they were determined to survive as a people.