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Immigrant Rights In The Shadows Of Citizenship

Author: Rachel Ida Buff
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814789749
Size: 57.48 MB
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Punctuated by marches across the United States in the spring of 2006, immigrant rights has reemerged as a significant and highly visible political issue. Immigrant Rights in the Shadows of U.S. Citizenship brings prominent activists and scholars together to examine the emergence and significance of the contemporary immigrant rights movement. Contributors place the contemporary immigrant rights movement in historical and comparative contexts by looking at the ways immigrants and their allies have staked claims to rights in the past, and by examining movements based in different communities around the United States. Scholars explain the evolution of immigration policy, and analyze current conflicts around issues of immigrant rights; activists engaged in the current movement document the ways in which coalitions have been built among immigrants from different nations, and between immigrant and native born peoples. The essays examine the ways in which questions of immigrant rights engage broader issues of identity, including gender, race, and sexuality.

Latino Cultural Citizenship

Author: William Vincent Flores
Publisher: Beacon Press
ISBN: 9780807046357
Size: 79.96 MB
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Through years of ethnographic work in Latino centers in San Antonio, Los Angeles, New York, San Jose, and Watsonville, California, eight prominent Latino scholars from disciplines such as anthropology, political science, and literary and legal studies explore the dynamics of Latino community-building and "cultural citizenship"-the use of cultural expression to claim political rights in the larger culture while maintaining a vibrant local identity. Chapters detail acts of cultural affirmation in Christmas festival celebrations in Texas, cannery strikes in California, educational programs in New York, and much more. A pathbreaking work of Latino scholarship, this book will help redefine the conversation about the future of community and the nature of citizenship in the United States The scholars in the interdisciplinary Inter-University Project (IUP) who wrote this book include Renato Rosaldo (Stanford University), Richard R. Flores (University of Wisconsin), Ana L. Juarbe (Hunter College), Blanca G. Silvestrini (University of Puerto Rico), Raymond Rocco (University of California, Los Angeles), the late Rosa Torruellas (Hunter College), and the volume's editors, William V. Flores (California State University, Northridge) and Rina Benmayor (California State University, Monterey Bay).

Unbecoming Americans

Author: Joseph Keith
Publisher: Rutgers University Press
ISBN: 0813559685
Size: 22.60 MB
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During the Cold War, Ellis Island no longer served as the largest port of entry for immigrants, but as a prison for holding aliens the state wished to deport. The government criminalized those it considered un-assimilable (from left-wing intellectuals and black radicals to racialized migrant laborers) through the denial, annulment, and curtailment of citizenship and its rights. The island, ceasing to represent the iconic ideal of immigrant America, came to symbolize its very limits. Unbecoming Americans sets out to recover the shadow narratives of un-American writers forged out of the racial and political limits of citizenship. In this collection of Afro-Caribbean, Filipino, and African American writers—C.L.R. James, Carlos Bulosan, Claudia Jones, and Richard Wright—Joseph Keith examines how they used their exclusion from the nation, a condition he terms “alienage,” as a standpoint from which to imagine alternative global solidarities and to interrogate the contradictions of the United States as a country, a republic, and an empire at the dawn of the "American Century.” Building on scholarship linking the forms of the novel to those of the nation, the book explores how these writers employed alternative aesthetic forms, including memoir, cultural criticism, and travel narrative, to contest prevailing notions of race, nation, and citizenship. Ultimately they produced a vital counter-discourse of freedom in opposition to the new formations of empire emerging in the years after World War II, forms that continue to shape our world today.

Rallying For Immigrant Rights

Author: Kim Voss
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520267540
Size: 22.85 MB
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“Through the excellent and noteworthy pieces of scholarship here, Rallying for Immigrant Rights vividly captures the dynamics of the 2006 immigration protests. This volume heralds an exciting shift in the study of political participation and raises timely questions about protest, immigration, and U.S. politics.” —Kenneth T. Andrews, author of Freedom is a Constant Struggle: The Mississippi Civil Rights Movement and Its Legacy “Rallying for Immigrant Rights challenges the existing theories in political behavior and social movement writings. This is a timely and excellent volume, and it should be required reading for anyone interested in political activism.” —Lisa García Bedolla, Chair, Center for Latino Policy Research, UC Berkeley “The essays in Rallying for Immigrant Rights offer an enlightening perspective on the 2006 protests and what they mean for the future of immigration politics in the U.S. This impressively orginal volume will be a standard reference for years to come.” —Karthick Ramakrishnan, Associate Professor of Political Science, UC Riverside

From The Land Of Shadows

Author: Khatharya Um
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 1479858234
Size: 15.26 MB
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In a century of mass atrocities, the Khmer Rouge regime marked Cambodia with one of the most extreme genocidal instances in human history. What emerged in the aftermath of the regime’s collapse in 1979 was a nation fractured by death and dispersal. It is estimated nearly one-fourth of the country’s population perished from hard labor, disease, starvation, and executions. Another half million fled their ancestral homeland, with over one hundred thousand people finding refuge in America. From The Land of Shadows surveys the Cambodian diaspora and the struggle to understand and make meaning of this historical trauma. Drawing on over 250 interviews with survivors across the United States as well as in France and Cambodia, Khatharya Um places these accounts in conversation with studies of comparative revolutions, totalitarianism, transnationalism, and memory works to illuminate the pathology of power as well as the impact of auto-genocide on individual and collective healing. Exploring the interstices of home and exile, forgetting and remembering, From the Land of Shadows follows the ways in which Cambodian individuals and communities seek to rebuild connections frayed by time, distance, and politics in the face of this injurious history.

The Cultural Politics Of U S Immigration

Author: Leah Perry
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 1479828777
Size: 29.18 MB
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In the 1980s, amid increasing immigration from Latin America, the Caribbean, and Asia, the circle of who was considered American seemed to broaden, reflecting the democratic gains made by racial minorities and women. Although this expanded circle was increasingly visible in the daily lives of Americans through TV shows, films, and popular news media, these gains were circumscribed by the discourse that certain immigrants, for instance single and working mothers, were feared, censured, or welcomed exclusively as laborers. In The Cultural Politics of U.S. Immigration, Leah Perry argues that 1980s immigration discourse in law and popular media was a crucial ingredient in the cohesion of the neoliberal idea of democracy. Blending critical legal analysis with a feminist media studies methodology over a range of sources, including legal documents, congressional debates, and popular media, such as Golden Girls, Who’s the Boss?, Scarface, and Mi Vida Loca, Perry shows how even while “multicultural” immigrants were embraced, they were at the same time disciplined through gendered discourses of respectability. Examining the relationship between law and culture, this book weaves questions of legal status and gender into existing discussions about race and ethnicity to revise our understanding of both neoliberalism and immigration.

Against The Deportation Terror

Author: Rachel Ida Buff
Publisher: Temple University Press
ISBN: 1439915342
Size: 45.26 MB
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Despite being characterized as a "nation of immigrants," the United States has seen a long history of immigrant rights struggles. In her timely book Against the Deportation Terror, Rachel Ida Buff uncovers this multiracial history. She traces the story of the American Committee for the Protection of the Foreign Born (ACPFB) from its origins in the 1930s through repression during the early Cold War, to engagement with "new" Latinx and Caribbean immigrants in the 1970s and early 1980s. Functioning as a hub connecting diverse foreign-born communities and racial justice advocates, the ACPFB responded to various, ongoing crises of what they called "the deportation terror." Advocates worked against repression, discrimination, detention, and expulsion in migrant communities across the nation at the same time as they supported reform of federal immigration policy. Prevailing in some cases and suffering defeats in others, the story of the ACPFB is characterized by persistence in multiracial organizing even during periods of protracted repression. By tracing the work of the ACPFB and its allies over half a century, Against the Deportation Terror provides important historical precedent for contemporary immigrant rights organizing. Its lessons continue to resonate today.

The Weight Of Shadows

Author: José Orduña
Publisher:
ISBN: 0807074012
Size: 10.19 MB
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Jose Orduna chronicles the process of becoming a North American citizen in a post-9/11 United States. Intractable realities - rooted in the continuity of US imperialism to globalism - form the landscape of Orduna's daily experience, where the geopolitical meets the quotidian. Orduna describes the absurd feeling of being handed a piece of paper, his naturalization certificate, that guarantees something he has always known: he has every right to be here. A trenchant exploration of race, class, and identity, The Weight of Shadows is a searing meditation on the nature of political, linguistic, and cultural borders, and the meaning of "America."

A Nation Of Immigrants

Author: John F. Kennedy
Publisher: HarperCollins
ISBN: 0062892843
Size: 39.19 MB
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This significant contribution to the debate on immigration reform was President John F. Kennedy’s final book and is as timely now as it was when it was first published—now reissued for its 60th anniversary, with a new introduction and foreword. “In this book, President Kennedy tells us what immigrants have done for America, and what America has done for its immigrants. It is one of the dramatic success stories of world history.... It can stand as a testament to a cause President Kennedy cherished, and which we should carry on.” — Robert F. Kennedy Throughout his presidency, John F. Kennedy was passionate about the issue of immigration reform. He believed that America is a nation of people who value both tradition and the exploration of new frontiers, people who deserve the freedom to build better lives for themselves in their adopted homeland. This 60th anniversary edition of his posthumously published, timeless work—with a new introduction, a new foreword by Jonathan Greenblatt, the national director and CEO of the Anti-Defamation League, and updated information on immigration policy reform—offers the late president's inspiring suggestions for immigration policy and presents a chronology of the main events in the history of immigration in America. As continued debates on immigration engulf the nation, this paean to the importance of immigrants to our nation's prominence and success is as timely as ever.

Migrant Imaginaries

Author: Alicia Schmidt Camacho
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814717349
Size: 50.83 MB
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Winner of the 2009 Lora Romero First Book Prize from the American Studies Association 2009 Choice Outstanding Academic Title Migrant Imaginaries explores the transnational movements of Mexican migrants in pursuit of labor and civil rights in the United States from the 1920s onward. Working through key historical moments such as the 1930s, the Chicano Movement, and contemporary globalization and neoliberalism, Alicia Schmidt Camacho examines the relationship between ethnic Mexican expressive culture and the practices sustaining migrant social movements. Combining sustained historical engagement with theoretical inquiries, she addresses how struggles for racial and gender equity, cross-border unity, and economic justice have defined the Mexican presence in the United States since 1910. Schmidt Camacho covers a range of archives and sources, including migrant testimonials and songs, Amrico Parede’s last published novel, The Shadow, the film Salt of the Earth, the foundational manifestos of El Movimiento, Richard Rodriguez’s memoirs, narratives by Marisela Norte and Rosario Sanmiguel, and testimonios of Mexican women workers and human rights activists, as well as significant ethnographic research. Throughout, she demonstrates how Mexicans and Mexican Americans imagined their communal ties across the border, and used those bonds to contest their noncitizen status. Migrant Imaginaries places migrants at the center of the hemisphere’s most pressing concerns, contending that border crossers have long been vital to social change.