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Imperial Japan At Its Zenith

Author: Kenneth J. Ruoff
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 0801471826
Size: 13.37 MB
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In 1940, Japan was into its third year of war with China, and relations with the United States were deteriorating. But in that year, the Japanese also commemorated the 2,600th anniversary of the founding of the Empire of Japan.

Park Chung Hee And Modern Korea

Author: Carter J. Eckert
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674973216
Size: 69.88 MB
Format: PDF
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For South Koreans, the early 1960s to late 1970s were the best and worst of times—a period of unprecedented economic growth and deepening political oppression. Carter J. Eckert finds the roots of this dramatic socioeconomic transformation in the country’s long history of militarization, personified in South Korea’s paramount leader, Park Chung Hee.

The Disempowered Development Of Tibet In China

Author: Andrew Martin Fischer
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 0739134396
Size: 38.99 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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This book explores the synergy between development and conflict in the Tibetan areas of Western China from the mid-1990s onward, when rapid economic growth occurred alongside a particularly assimilationist policy approach. Based on accessible economic analysis and extensive interdisciplinary fieldwork, it represents one of the only macro-level and systemic analyses of its kind in the scholarship on Tibet, and also holds much interest for those interested in China and in development and conflict more generally.

When Empire Comes Home

Author: Lori Watt
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674055988
Size: 60.82 MB
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Following the end of World War II in Asia, the Allied powers repatriated over six million Japanese nationals from colonies and battlefields throughout Asia and deported more than a million colonial subjects from Japan to their countries of origin. Depicted at the time as a postwar measure related to the demobilization of defeated Japanese soldiers, this population transfer was a central element in the human dismantling of the Japanese empire that resonates with other post-colonial and post-imperial migrations in the twentieth century. Lori Watt analyzes how the human remnants of empire, those who were moved and those who were left behind, served as sites of negotiation in the process of the jettisoning of the colonial project and in the creation of new national identities in Japan. Through an exploration of the creation and uses of the figure of the repatriate, in political, social, and cultural realms, this study addresses the question of what happens when empire comes home.

Sideshow

Author: William Shawcross
Publisher: Cooper Square Pub
ISBN: 9780815412243
Size: 28.76 MB
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In Sideshow, journalist Shawcross presents the first full-scale investigation of the secret and illegal war the United States fought with Cambodia from 1969 to 1973, paving the way for the Khmer Rouge massacres of the mid-70s.

Maneuvers

Author: Cynthia Enloe
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 052092374X
Size: 48.69 MB
Format: PDF
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Maneuvers takes readers on a global tour of the sprawling process called "militarization." With her incisive verve and moxie, eminent feminist Cynthia Enloe shows that the people who become militarized are not just the obvious ones—executives and factory floor workers who make fighter planes, land mines, and intercontinental missiles. They are also the employees of food companies, toy companies, clothing companies, film studios, stock brokerages, and advertising agencies. Militarization is never gender-neutral, Enloe claims: It is a personal and political transformation that relies on ideas about femininity and masculinity. Films that equate action with war, condoms that are designed with a camouflage pattern, fashions that celebrate brass buttons and epaulettes, tomato soup that contains pasta shaped like Star Wars weapons—all of these contribute to militaristic values that mold our culture in both war and peace. Presenting new and groundbreaking material that builds on Enloe's acclaimed work in Does Khaki Become You? and Bananas, Beaches, and Bases, Maneuvers takes an international look at the politics of masculinity, nationalism, and globalization. Enloe ranges widely from Japan to Korea, Serbia, Kosovo, Rwanda, Britain, Israel, the United States, and many points in between. She covers a broad variety of subjects: gays in the military, the history of "camp followers," the politics of women who have sexually serviced male soldiers, married life in the military, military nurses, and the recruitment of women into the military. One chapter titled "When Soldiers Rape" explores the many facets of the issue in countries such as Chile, the Philippines, Okinawa, Rwanda, and the United States. Enloe outlines the dilemmas feminists around the globe face in trying to craft theories and strategies that support militarized women, locally and internationally, without unwittingly being militarized themselves. She explores the complicated militarized experiences of women as prostitutes, as rape victims, as mothers, as wives, as nurses, and as feminist activists, and she uncovers the "maneuvers" that military officials and their civilian supporters have made in order to ensure that each of these groups of women feel special and separate.

Placing Empire

Author: Kate McDonald
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520293916
Size: 24.10 MB
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A free ebook version of this title is available through Luminos, University of California Press’s Open Access publishing program. Visit www.luminosoa.org to learn more. Placing Empire examines the spatial politics of Japanese imperialism through a study of Japanese travel and tourism to Korea, Manchuria, and Taiwan between the late nineteenth century and the early 1950s. In a departure from standard histories of Japan, this book shows how debates over the role of colonized lands reshaped the social and spatial imaginary of the modern Japanese nation and how, in turn, this sociospatial imaginary affected the ways in which colonial difference was conceptualized and enacted. The book thus illuminates how ideas of place became central to the production of new forms of colonial hierarchy as empires around the globe transitioned from an era of territorial acquisition to one of territorial maintenance.

The Art Of Censorship In Postwar Japan

Author: Kirsten Cather
Publisher: University of Hawaii Press
ISBN:
Size: 61.95 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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This book explores the practice of censorship in modern Japan, focusing on the most celebrated censorship trials of literature, film, and manga in the post WW II period.

The Rise Of Rome

Author: Anthony Everitt
Publisher: Random House Incorporated
ISBN: 1400066638
Size: 30.52 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Traces the rise of Rome as an unlikely evolution from a market village to the world's most powerful empire, offering insight into its political clashes, military strategies, leading figures, and internal corruptions.