Download in the front door creating a college going culture of learning in pdf or read in the front door creating a college going culture of learning in pdf online books in PDF, EPUB and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to get in the front door creating a college going culture of learning in pdf book now. This site is like a library, Use search box in the widget to get ebook that you want.



In The Front Door

Author: Hugh Mehan
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317257707
Size: 43.90 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 1676
Download and Read
This book provides a critical analysis of the origins, nature, development, and transformation of the state and society historically and today, examining the class nature and social basis of politics and the state in different societal settings. The book emphasizes the centrality of class relations in explaining political power and the role of the state in class-divided societies by providing powerful theoretical and empirical analyses of themes in political sociology in an era of globalization. It examines in detail the major political issues and events of our time, and makes them relevant to the study of power and politics today. Students from many ethnic minority backgrounds and low-income families are underrepresented in American colleges and universities. This book describes and assesses educational policies and practices that seek to rectify this important manifestation of structured inequality. Inspired by a commitment to providing a pathway to college and beyond, Mehan and his team document the innovate practices developed and implemented at the nationally recognized schools created by The Center for Research in Educational Equity, Access, and Teaching Excellence (CREATE) at the University of California-San Diego: the Preuss School, a 6-12 charter school on the UCSD campus for underrepresented minority students; and nearby schools located in economically depressed neighborhoods. Based on long-term research, Mehan's book makes important contributions to the literature on educational achievement disparities that exist-and are growing-within the United States. He sheds light on how we can improve public policy for the futures of secondary school students.

Values And Virtues In Higher Education Research

Author: Jean McNiff
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317423925
Size: 69.74 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 2417
Download and Read
Values and Virtues in Higher Education Research centres on practitioners studying and researching their practices in higher education settings, in order to improve those practices for the benefit of others and themselves. Making research public is a key aspect of ensuring the quality of educational research and educational practices: Values and Virtues in Higher Education Research raises questions and develops conversations about why higher education practitioners should study and improve their work, how this may be done, and what might be some of the benefits of doing so. What we do as practitioners is influenced by and linked with what we value, what we believe is good. Improving practices therefore involves becoming aware of and interrogating the values that enter into and inform those practices; a study of practices becomes a study of the relationships between the practices in question and their values base. From an international group of contributors in this growing field, this book provides strong theoretical resources and case study material that shows how this transformation may be achieved, including topics such as: Theorising practices to show personal and organisational accountability Developing inter-professional and inter-disciplinary dialogues for social transformation Establishing communities of inquiry in higher education and other workplace settings Reconceptualising professional education as research-informed practice Locating educational theory in the real world for human and environmental wellbeing Showing the evolution of theory through critical engagement, this text will be a valuable companion for lecturers, students and professional developers in higher education. This book will form core reading for those who are interested in engaging in practice-based research, and as additional reading for those whose aim is to broaden their thinking in relation to the role of values and virtues in educational research. Jean McNiff is an independent researcher and writer, Professor of Educational Research at York St John University, and Visiting Professor at Oslo and Akershus University College, Beijing Normal University and Ningxia Teachers University. She is also the author of key texts Action Research: Principles and Practice, You and Your Action Research Project and Writing Up Your Action Research Project.

Degrees Of Inequality

Author: Ann L. Mullen
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 9780801899126
Size: 56.83 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 3371
Download and Read
Moving interviews with 100 students at the two institutions highlight how American higher education reinforces the same inequities it has been aiming to transcend.

Mindsets In The Classroom

Author: Mary Cay Ricci
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781618210814
Size: 16.77 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 815
Download and Read
Inspired by the popular mindset idea that hard work and effort can lead to success, this resource provides educators with ideas for ways to build a growth mindset school culture, wherein students are challenged to change their thinking about their abilities and potential.

College Disrupted

Author: Ryan Craig
Publisher: St. Martin's Press
ISBN: 1466879149
Size: 20.12 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 4598
Download and Read
For nearly two decades, pundits have been predicting the demise of higher education in the United States. Our colleges and universities will soon find themselves competing for students with universities from around the world. With the advent of massive open online courses ("MOOCS") over the past two years, predictions that higher education will be the next industry to undergo "disruption" have become more frequent and fervent. Currently a university's reputation relies heavily on the "four Rs" in which the most elite schools thrive—rankings, research, real estate, and rah! (i.e. sports). But for the majority of students who are not attending these elite institutions, the "four Rs" offer poor value for the expense of a college education. Craig sees the future of higher education in online degrees that unbundle course offerings to offer a true bottom line return for the majority of students in terms of graduation, employment, and wages. College Disrupted details the changes that American higher education will undergo, including the transformation from packaged courses and degrees to truly unbundled course offerings, along with those that it will not. Written by a professional at the only investment firm focused on the higher education market, College Disrupted takes a creative view of the forces roiling higher education and the likely outcome, including light-hearted, real-life anecdotes that illustrate the author's points.

Cultural Foundations Of Learning

Author: Jin Li
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521768292
Size: 26.34 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 1576
Download and Read
Describes fundamental differences in learning beliefs between the Western mind model and the East Asian virtue model of learning.

Teaching What You Don T Know

Author: Therese Huston
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674035805
Size: 27.50 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 398
Download and Read
In a practical and funny resource, an experienced teaching consultant offers creative strategies for teachers and professors who are handling a subject they don't know, in a book that offers tips for introducing topics in a lively style, for teaching unresponsive students, and for dealing with impossible questions.

Academically Adrift

Author: Richard Arum
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226028577
Size: 36.46 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 3721
Download and Read
In spite of soaring tuition costs, more and more students go to college every year. A bachelor’s degree is now required for entry into a growing number of professions. And some parents begin planning for the expense of sending their kids to college when they’re born. Almost everyone strives to go, but almost no one asks the fundamental question posed by Academically Adrift: are undergraduates really learning anything once they get there? For a large proportion of students, Richard Arum and Josipa Roksa’s answer to that question is a definitive no. Their extensive research draws on survey responses, transcript data, and, for the first time, the state-of-the-art Collegiate Learning Assessment, a standardized test administered to students in their first semester and then again at the end of their second year. According to their analysis of more than 2,300 undergraduates at twenty-four institutions, 45 percent of these students demonstrate no significant improvement in a range of skills—including critical thinking, complex reasoning, and writing—during their first two years of college. As troubling as their findings are, Arum and Roksa argue that for many faculty and administrators they will come as no surprise—instead, they are the expected result of a student body distracted by socializing or working and an institutional culture that puts undergraduate learning close to the bottom of the priority list. Academically Adrift holds sobering lessons for students, faculty, administrators, policy makers, and parents—all of whom are implicated in promoting or at least ignoring contemporary campus culture. Higher education faces crises on a number of fronts, but Arum and Roksa’s report that colleges are failing at their most basic mission will demand the attention of us all.