Download indigenous people crime and punishment in pdf or read indigenous people crime and punishment in pdf online books in PDF, EPUB and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to get indigenous people crime and punishment in pdf book now. This site is like a library, Use search box in the widget to get ebook that you want.



Indigenous People Crime And Punishment

Author: Thalia Anthony
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134620489
Size: 72.64 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 7413
Download and Read
Indigenous People, Crime and Punishment examines criminal sentencing courts’ changing characterisations of Indigenous peoples’ identity, culture and postcolonial status. Focusing largely on Australian Indigenous peoples, but drawing also on the Canadian experiences, Thalia Anthony critically analyses how the judiciary have interpreted Indigenous difference. Through an analysis of Indigenous sentencing remarks over a fifty year period in a number of jurisdictions, the book demonstrates how judicial discretion is moulded to dominant white assumptions about Indigeneity. More specifically, Indigenous People, Crime and Punishment shows how the increasing demonisation of Indigenous criminality and culture in sentencing has turned earlier ‘gains’ in the legal recognition of Indigenous peoples on their head. The recognition of Indigenous difference is thereby revealed as a pliable concept that is just as likely to remove concessions as it is to grant them. Indigenous People, Crime and Punishment suggests that Indigenous justice requires a two-way recognition process where Indigenous people and legal systems are afforded greater control in sentencing, dispute resolution and Indigenous healing.

Indigenous People Crime And Punishment

Author: Thalia Anthony
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134620551
Size: 63.23 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 6848
Download and Read
Indigenous People, Crime and Punishment examines criminal sentencing courts’ changing characterisations of Indigenous peoples’ identity, culture and postcolonial status. Focusing largely on Australian Indigenous peoples, but drawing also on the Canadian experiences, Thalia Anthony critically analyses how the judiciary have interpreted Indigenous difference. Through an analysis of Indigenous sentencing remarks over a fifty year period in a number of jurisdictions, the book demonstrates how judicial discretion is moulded to dominant white assumptions about Indigeneity. More specifically, Indigenous People, Crime and Punishment shows how the increasing demonisation of Indigenous criminality and culture in sentencing has turned earlier ‘gains’ in the legal recognition of Indigenous peoples on their head. The recognition of Indigenous difference is thereby revealed as a pliable concept that is just as likely to remove concessions as it is to grant them. Indigenous People, Crime and Punishment suggests that Indigenous justice requires a two-way recognition process where Indigenous people and legal systems are afforded greater control in sentencing, dispute resolution and Indigenous healing.

Indigenous Courts Self Determination And Criminal Justice

Author: Valmaine Toki
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1351239600
Size: 66.49 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 6805
Download and Read
In New Zealand, as well as in Australia, Canada and other comparable jurisdictions, Indigenous peoples comprise a significantly disproportionate percentage of the prison population. For example, Maori, who comprise 15% of New Zealand’s population, make up 50% of its prisoners. For Maori women, the figure is 60%. These statistics have, moreover, remained more or less the same for at least the past thirty years. With New Zealand as its focus, this book explores how the fact that Indigenous peoples are more likely than any other ethnic group to be apprehended, arrested, prosecuted, convicted and incarcerated, might be alleviated. Taking seriously the rights to culture and to self-determination contained in the Treaty of Waitangi, in many comparable jurisdictions (including Australia, Canada, the United States of America), and also in the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, the book make the case for an Indigenous court founded on Indigenous conceptions of proper conduct, punishment, and behavior. More specifically, the book draws on contemporary notions of ‘therapeutic jurisprudence’ and ‘restorative justice’ in order to argue that such a court would offer an effective way to ameliorate the disproportionate incarceration of Indigenous peoples.

Indigenous Criminology

Author: Cunneen, Chris
Publisher: Policy Press
ISBN: 1447321758
Size: 46.83 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 1768
Download and Read
Indigenous Criminology comprehensively explores Indigenous people’s contact with criminal justice systems in a contemporary and historical context. It addresses both the theoretical underpinnings of the development of a specific Indigenous criminology, and canvasses the broader policy and practice implications for criminal justice.

Choctaw Crime And Punishment 1884 1907

Author: Devon Abbott Mihesuah
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
ISBN: 0806186038
Size: 78.18 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 6794
Download and Read
During the decades between the Civil War and the establishment of Oklahoma statehood, Choctaws suffered almost daily from murders, thefts, and assaults—usually at the hands of white intruders, but increasingly by Choctaws themselves. This book focuses on two previously unexplored murder cases to illustrate the intense factionalism that emerged among tribal members during those lawless years as conservative Nationalists and pro-assimilation Progressives fought for control of the Choctaw Nation. Devon Abbott Mihesuah describes the brutal murder in 1884 of her own great-great-grandfather, Nationalist Charles Wilson, who was a Choctaw lighthorseman and U.S. deputy marshal. She then relates the killing spree of Progressives by Nationalist Silan Lewis ten years later. Mihesuah draws on a wide array of sources—even in the face of missing court records—to weave a spellbinding account of homicide and political intrigue. She painstakingly delineates a transformative period in Choctaw history to explore emerging gulfs between Choctaw citizens and address growing Indian resistance to white intrusions, federal policies, and the taking of tribal resources. The first book to fully describe this Choctaw factionalism, Choctaw Crime and Punishment is both a riveting narrative and an important analysis of tribal politics.

Arresting Incarceration

Author: Don Weatherburn
Publisher: Aboriginal Studies Press
ISBN: 1922059552
Size: 35.77 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 405
Download and Read
In this outstanding new study Don Weatherburn confronts the data, appalling as they are, with his characteristic plain speaking and good sense. No excuses are offered, or simple solutions applied. — Mark Finnane, ARC Australian Professorial Fellow, Griffith University This is a provocative and courageous book by a well-respected criminologist, offering a critique of the over-representation of Indigenous people in custody and of the programs and approaches that are attempting to ameliorate the situation…All Australians owe it to Indigenous Australians to reduce these rates of incarceration. — Dr Maggie Brady, CAEPR, ANU Finally Weatherburn reviews some of the clumsy theorizing that have been at the centre of the debates about the overrepresentation of Indigenous Australians in our criminal justice system since the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Death inCustody in the early 1990s. — Rod Broadhurst, Professor of Criminology at the ANU Despite sweeping reforms by the Keating government following the 1991 Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody, the rate of Indigenous imprisonment has soared. What has gone wrong? In Arresting incarceration, Dr Don Weatherburn charts the events that led to Royal Commission. He also argues that past efforts to reduce the number of Aboriginal Australians in prison have failed to adequately address the underlying causes of Indigenous involvement in violent crime; namely drug and alcohol abuse, child neglect and abuse, poor school performance and unemployment.

The Oxford Handbook Of Ethnicity Crime And Immigration

Author: Sandra M. Bucerius
Publisher: Oxford Handbooks
ISBN: 0199859019
Size: 64.16 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 5089
Download and Read
This title provides comprehensive analyses of current knowledge about the unwarranted disparities in dealings with the criminal justice system faced by some disadvantaged minority groups in all developed countries.

Comic Book Crime

Author: Nickie D. Phillips
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814767877
Size: 71.62 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 3793
Download and Read
“Carrying ahead the project of cultural criminology, Phillips and Strobl dare to take seriously that which amuses and entertains us—and to find in it the most significant of themes. Audiences, images, ideologies of justice and injustice—all populate the pages of Comic Book Crime. The result is an analysis as colorful as a good comic, and as sharp as the point on a superhero’s sword.”—Jeff Ferrell, author of Empire of Scrounge Superman, Batman, Daredevil, and Wonder Woman are iconic cultural figures that embody values of order, fairness, justice, and retribution. Comic Book Crime digs deep into these and other celebrated characters, providing a comprehensive understanding of crime and justice in contemporary American comic books. This is a world where justice is delivered, where heroes save ordinary citizens from certain doom, where evil is easily identified and thwarted by powers far greater than mere mortals could possess. Nickie Phillips and Staci Strobl explore these representations and show that comic books, as a historically important American cultural medium, participate in both reflecting and shaping an American ideological identity that is often focused on ideas of the apocalypse, utopia, retribution, and nationalism. Through an analysis of approximately 200 comic books sold from 2002 to 2010, as well as several years of immersion in comic book fan culture, Phillips and Strobl reveal the kinds of themes and plots popular comics feature in a post-9/11 context. They discuss heroes’ calculations of “deathworthiness,” or who should be killed in meting out justice, and how these judgments have as much to do with the hero’s character as they do with the actions of the villains. This fascinating volume also analyzes how class, race, ethnicity, gender, and sexual orientation are used to construct difference for both the heroes and the villains in ways that are both conservative and progressive. Engaging, sharp, and insightful, Comic Book Crime is a fresh take on the very meaning of truth, justice, and the American way. Nickie D. Phillips is Associate Professor in the Sociology and Criminal Justice Department at St. Francis College in Brooklyn, NY. Staci Strobl is Associate Professor in the Department of Law, Police Science and Criminal Justice Administration at John Jay College of Criminal Justice. In the Alternative Criminology series

Conflict Politics And Crime

Author: Chris Cunneen
Publisher: Allen & Unwin
ISBN: 1741150213
Size: 30.43 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 4047
Download and Read
Aboriginal people are grossly over represented in Australia's courts and gaols and despite inquiries into the phenomenon, indigenous people continue to be more likely to be apprehended, sentenced and incarcerated. This book focuses on how police and Aboriginals interact in urban and rural areas.

Indigenous Crime And Settler Law

Author: H. Douglas
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137284986
Size: 66.58 MB
Format: PDF
View: 4266
Download and Read
In a break from the contemporary focus on the law's response to inter-racial crime, the authors examine the law's approach to the victimization of one Indigenous person by another. Drawing on a wealth of archival material relating to homicides in Australia, they conclude that settlers and Indigenous peoples still live in the shadow of empire.