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Inventing Baby Food

Author: Amy Bentley
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520959140
Size: 32.36 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Food consumption is a significant and complex social activity—and what a society chooses to feed its children reveals much about its tastes and ideas regarding health. In this groundbreaking historical work, Amy Bentley explores how the invention of commercial baby food shaped American notions of infancy and influenced the evolution of parental and pediatric care. Until the late nineteenth century, infants were almost exclusively fed breast milk. But over the course of a few short decades, Americans began feeding their babies formula and solid foods, frequently as early as a few weeks after birth. By the 1950s, commercial baby food had become emblematic of all things modern in postwar America. Little jars of baby food were thought to resolve a multitude of problems in the domestic sphere: they reduced parental anxieties about nutrition and health; they made caretakers feel empowered; and they offered women entering the workforce an irresistible convenience. But these baby food products laden with sugar, salt, and starch also became a gateway to the industrialized diet that blossomed during this period. Today, baby food continues to be shaped by medical, commercial, and parenting trends. Baby food producers now contend with health and nutrition problems as well as the rise of alternative food movements. All of this matters because, as the author suggests, it’s during infancy that American palates become acclimated to tastes and textures, including those of highly processed, minimally nutritious, and calorie-dense industrial food products.

Inventing Baby Food

Author: Amy Bentley
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520283457
Size: 24.51 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 2014
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Food consumption is a significant and complex social activity—and what a society chooses to feed its children reveals much about its tastes and ideas regarding health. In this groundbreaking historical work, Amy Bentley explores how the invention of commercial baby food shaped American notions of infancy and influenced the evolution of parental and pediatric care. Until the late nineteenth century, infants were almost exclusively fed breast milk. But over the course of a few short decades, Americans began feeding their babies formula and solid foods, frequently as early as a few weeks after birth. By the 1950s, commercial baby food had become emblematic of all things modern in postwar America. Little jars of baby food were thought to resolve a multitude of problems in the domestic sphere: they reduced parental anxieties about nutrition and health; they made caretakers feel empowered; and they offered women entering the workforce an irresistible convenience. But these baby food products laden with sugar, salt, and starch also became a gateway to the industrialized diet that blossomed during this period. Today, baby food continues to be shaped by medical, commercial, and parenting trends. Baby food producers now contend with health and nutrition problems as well as the rise of alternative food movements. All of this matters because, as the author suggests, it’s during infancy that American palates become acclimated to tastes and textures, including those of highly processed, minimally nutritious, and calorie-dense industrial food products.

Inventing Baby Food

Author: Amy Bentley
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520277376
Size: 31.99 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 4495
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Explores how the invention of commercial baby food shaped American notions of infancy and influenced the evolution of parental and pediatric care. Simultaneous eBook.

Inventing The Child

Author: Joseph L. Zornado
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 1135577862
Size: 62.15 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Traces the historical roots of Western culture's stories of childhood in which the child is subjugated to the adult. Going back 400 years, it looks again at Hamlet, fairy tales of the Brothers Grimm, and Walt Disney cartoons.

Kids Inventing

Author: Susan Casey
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 9781118040201
Size: 11.91 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Have you ever seen inventors on TV or in the newspaper and thought, "That could be me!" Well, it certainly could—and this book shows you how. Kids Inventing! gives you easy-to-follow, step-by-step instructions for turning your ideas into realities for fun, competition, and even profit. From finding an idea and creating a working model to patenting, manufacturing, and selling your invention, you get expert guidance in all the different stages of inventing. You'll see how to keep an inventor's log, present your ideas, and work as part of a team or with a mentor. You'll meet inspiring kids just like you who designed their own award-winning inventions. And you'll see how to prepare for the various state and national invention contests held each year, as well as international competitions and science fairs.

Re Inventing The Book

Author: Christina Banou
Publisher: Chandos Publishing
ISBN: 0081012799
Size: 59.58 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Re-Inventing the Book: Challenges from the Past for the Publishing Industry chronicles the significant changes that have taken place in the publishing industry in the past few decades and how they have altered the publishing value chain and the structure of the industry itself. The book examines and discusses how most publishing values, aims, and strategies have been common since the Renaissance. It aims to provide a methodological framework, not only for the understanding, explanation, and interpretation of the current situation, but also for the development of new strategies. The book features an overview of the publishing industry as it appears today, showing innovative methods and trends, highlighting new opportunities created by information technologies, and identifying challenges. Values discussed include globalization, convergence, access to information, disintermediation, discoverability, innovation, reader engagement, co-creation, and aesthetics in publishing. Describes common values and features in the publishing industry since the Renaissance/invention of printing Proposes a methodological framework that helps users understand current publishing issues and trends Focuses on reader engagement and participation Proposes and discusses the publishing chain, not only as a value chain, but also as an information chain Considers the aesthetics of publishing, not only for the printed book, but also for digital material

Inventing Equal Opportunity

Author: Frank Dobbin
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9781400830893
Size: 38.50 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Equal opportunity in the workplace is thought to be the direct legacy of the civil rights and feminist movements and the landmark Civil Rights Act of 1964. Yet, as Frank Dobbin demonstrates, corporate personnel experts--not Congress or the courts--were the ones who determined what equal opportunity meant in practice, designing changes in how employers hire, promote, and fire workers, and ultimately defining what discrimination is, and is not, in the American imagination. Dobbin shows how Congress and the courts merely endorsed programs devised by corporate personnel. He traces how the first measures were adopted by military contractors worried that the Kennedy administration would cancel their contracts if they didn't take "affirmative action" to end discrimination. These measures built on existing personnel programs, many designed to prevent bias against unionists. Dobbin follows the changes in the law as personnel experts invented one wave after another of equal opportunity programs. He examines how corporate personnel formalized hiring and promotion practices in the 1970s to eradicate bias by managers; how in the 1980s they answered Ronald Reagan's threat to end affirmative action by recasting their efforts as diversity-management programs; and how the growing presence of women in the newly named human resources profession has contributed to a focus on sexual harassment and work/life issues. Inventing Equal Opportunity reveals how the personnel profession devised--and ultimately transformed--our understanding of discrimination.

Inventing The Garden

Author: Matteo Vercelloni
Publisher: Getty Publications
ISBN: 1606060473
Size: 25.80 MB
Format: PDF
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The authors trace the evolution of the Western garden from the first plots cultivated for pleasure in the Middle East to today's diverse green spaces that challenge traditional ideas about what constitutes a garden. They examine the changing attitude toward nature--as something to be dominated or embraced, ordered or allowed to range freely, exploited or conserved. Examples of the highly prescribed hortus conclusus or enclosed spaces of the Middle Ages are found in the Italian Renaissance gardens and the symmetries of Versailles and Les Tuileries. After the rise of Romanticism in the late eighteenth century, English gardeners such as William Kent and "Capability" Brown embraced the concept that nature should prevail over man's manipulation of it and created gardens that broke through traditional enclosures. A century later, while the American West witnessed both the conquering spirit of the homesteaders and the first stirrings of the conservation movement, urban parks and gardens were created as oases to which all people had access. The book concludes with a look at contemporary gardens, where efforts to reclaim landscapes and repurpose crumbling infrastructure are taking place within an atmosphere of ecological sensitivity--appreciating the idea that the whole planet is a garden and all who live in it are gardeners.

Inventing Western Civilization

Author: Thomas C. Patterson
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 158367408X
Size: 55.62 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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"In this wonderful book, Thomas Patterson effectively dethrones the concept of 'civilization' as an abstract good, transcending human society." --Martin Bernal Drawing on his extensive knowledge of early societies, Thomas C. Patterson shows how class, sexism, and racism have been integral to the appearance of "civilized" societies in Western Europe. He lays out clearly and simply how civilization, with its designs of "civilizing" and "being civilized," has been closely tied to the rise of capitalism in Western Europe and the development of social classes.

From Betty Crocker To Feminist Food Studies

Author: Arlene Voski Avakian
Publisher: Liverpool University Press
ISBN: 9781558495111
Size: 76.63 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Sheds light on the history of food, cooking, and eating. This collection of essays investigates the connections between food studies and women's studies. From women in colonial India to Armenian American feminists, these essays show how food has served as a means to assert independence and personal identity.