Download inventing intelligence a social history of smart in pdf or read inventing intelligence a social history of smart in pdf online books in PDF, EPUB and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to get inventing intelligence a social history of smart in pdf book now. This site is like a library, Use search box in the widget to get ebook that you want.



Inventing Intelligence

Author: Paul Michael Privateer
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1405152303
Size: 21.20 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 3612
Download and Read
What is intelligence? What makes humans Homo sapiens — the intelligent species?Inventing Intelligence is a bold deconstruction of the history of intelligence. Uncoupling our understanding of this most familiar concept from its traditional social science moorings, this book trains a cultural studies lens on intelligence to expose it as yet another form of representation. Inventing Intelligence charts the history of intelligence from its earliest articulations through to postmodern AI. Individual chapters recount the loving spheres of divine intelligence imagined by Plato, the self-conscious stylings of the Renaissance Man, the politics of intelligence in the Enlightenment, as well as contemporary assessments of digital intelligence and the mysterious adventure of Einstein’s brain. Ambitious in its historical sweep, unflinching in its challenge to conventional wisdom, Inventing Intelligence is for everyone and anyone who used to think that the parameters and the stakes of intelligence—evident in the current controversy over “intelligent” design—had been negotiated and finalized.

Inventing The Egghead

Author: Aaron Lecklider
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 0812244869
Size: 58.57 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 7656
Download and Read
Throughout the twentieth century, popular songs, magazine articles, plays, posters, and novels alternated between representing intelligence as empowering and as threatening. In Inventing the Egghead, Aaron Lecklider cracks open this paradox by examining representations of intelligence to reveal brainpower's stalwart appeal and influence.

A History Of Intelligence And Intellectual Disability

Author: C F Goodey
Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.
ISBN: 1409482359
Size: 79.69 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 2407
Download and Read
Starting with the hypothesis that not only human intelligence but also its antithesis 'intellectual disability' are nothing more than historical contingencies, C.F. Goodey's paradigm-shifting study traces the rich interplay between labelled human types and the radically changing characteristics attributed to them. From the twelfth-century beginnings of European social administration to the onset of formal human science disciplines in the modern era, A History of Intelligence and 'Intellectual Disability' reconstructs the socio-political and religious contexts of intellectual ability and disability, and demonstrates how these concepts became part of psychology, medicine and biology. Goodey examines a wide array of classical, late medieval and Renaissance texts, from popular guides on conduct and behavior to medical treatises and from religious and philosophical works to poetry and drama. Focusing especially on the period between the Protestant Reformation and 1700, Goodey challenges the accepted wisdom that would have us believe that 'intelligence' and 'disability' describe natural, trans-historical realities. Instead, Goodey argues for a model that views intellectual disability and indeed the intellectually disabled person as recent cultural creations. His book is destined to become a standard resource for scholars interested in the history of psychology and medicine, the social origins of human self-representation, and current ethical debates about the genetics of intelligence.

A Cultural History Of Early Modern English Cryptography Manuals

Author: Katherine Ellison
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1315458195
Size: 77.68 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 7356
Download and Read
During and after the English civil wars, between 1640 and the 1690, an unprecedented number of manuals teaching cryptography were published, almost all for the general public. While there are many surveys of cryptography, none pay any attention to the volume of manuals that appeared during the seventeenth century, or provide any cultural context for the appearance, design, or significance of the genre during the period. On the contrary, when the period’s cryptography writings are mentioned, they are dismissed as esoteric, impractical, and useless. Yet, as this book demonstrates, seventeenth-century cryptography manuals show us one clear beginning of the capitalization of information. In their pages, intelligence - as private message and as mental ability - becomes a central commodity in the emergence of England’s capitalist media state. Publications boasting the disclosure of secrets had long been popular, particularly for English readers with interests in the occult, but it was during these particular decades of the seventeenth century when cryptography emerged as a permanent bureaucratic function for the English government, a fashionable activity for the stylish English reader, and a respected discipline worthy of its own genre. These manuals established cryptography as a primer for intelligence, a craft able to identify and test particular mental abilities deemed ’smart’ and useful for England’s financial future. Through close readings of five specific primary texts that have been ignored not only in cryptography scholarship but also in early modern literary, scientific, and historical studies, this book allows us to see one origin of disciplinary division in the popular imagination and in the university, when particular broad fields - the sciences, the mechanical arts, and the liberal arts - came to be viewed as more or less profitable.

Inventing Intelligence How America Came To Worship Iq

Author: Elaine E. Castles
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 1440803382
Size: 13.58 MB
Format: PDF
View: 351
Download and Read
The use and misuse of IQ tests has long been a subject of contention in the scientific and social communities, particularly because these evaluations favor intelligence at the expense of other valuable human qualities. This is the first book of its kind to examine the historical development of our modern concept of intelligence and to explore America's fascination with the controversial exams that purport to measure it. • A detailed assessment of the century-long debate over IQ tests and their uses • Interdisciplinary content covering psychology, history, science, and sociology • A collection of popular opinions of intelligence assessment from professionals, pundits, and politicians • A chronological look at the concept of intelligence and at the process through which Americans have come to worship it

The Genius Within

Author: David Adam
Publisher: Pan Macmillan
ISBN: 1509805044
Size: 39.67 MB
Format: PDF
View: 6052
Download and Read
From the Sunday Times bestselling author of The Man Who Couldn't Stop. 'Witty, sharp and enlightening . . . This book will make you smarter' Adam Rutherford. What if you have more intelligence than you realize? What if there is a genius inside you, just waiting to be released? And what if the route to better brain power is not hard work or thousands of hours of practice but to simply swallow a pill? In The Genius Within, bestselling author David Adam explores the ground-breaking neuroscience of cognitive enhancement that is changing the way the brain and the mind works – to make it better, sharper, more focused and, yes, more intelligent. Sharing his own experiments with revolutionary smart drugs and electrical brain stimulation, he delves into the sinister history of intelligence tests, meets savants and brain hackers and reveals how he boosted his own IQ to cheat his way into Mensa. Going to the heart of how we consider, measure and judge mental ability, The Genius Within asks difficult questions about the science that could rank and define us, and inevitably shape our future.

Computational Collective Intelligence

Author: Tadeusz M. Szuba
Publisher: Wiley-Interscience
ISBN: 9780471349662
Size: 52.14 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 2299
Download and Read
This volume presents for the first time a complete theory of collective intelligence, helping to explain this growing area of non-deterministic computing. The author brings together ideas from different areas, making this a useful resource not only for computer scientists, but also for researchers working on problems in machine learning and artificial intelligence. Random PROLOG Processor (RPP) is used to illustrate the theory.

Observing Complexity

Author: William Rasch
Publisher: U of Minnesota Press
ISBN: 1452903921
Size: 12.61 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 965
Download and Read
The rubric of systems theory brings together conceptual models and approaches in the sciences and social sciences that study complexity. It attempts to provide a coherent means of describing all systems, whether organic or inorganic, and offers a theory of knowledge that can account for the integration of humans in the social, informational, and ecological systems in which we are enmeshed. An introduction to the major concepts and foremost thinkers of systems theory, this book brings systems theory into interaction with the major figures of postmodern theory. The format is multiplex and open -- a rich montage, including interviews, exemplary essays, and staged dialogues. Throughout, the writers' aim is not to solidity theory but to provide a thorough explication and an open-ended exploration of how systems theory can address, in a fresh and productive way, theoretical questions that too often have led to impasses between different schools of postmodern theory.

Are We Smart Enough To Know How Smart Animals Are

Author: Frans de Waal
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393246191
Size: 58.93 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 2558
Download and Read
A New York Times Bestseller From world-renowned biologist and primatologist Frans de Waal, a groundbreaking work on animal intelligence destined to become a classic. What separates your mind from an animal’s? Maybe you think it’s your ability to design tools, your sense of self, or your grasp of past and future—all traits that have helped us define ourselves as the planet’s preeminent species. But in recent decades, these claims have eroded, or even been disproven outright, by a revolution in the study of animal cognition. Take the way octopuses use coconut shells as tools; elephants that classify humans by age, gender, and language; or Ayumu, the young male chimpanzee at Kyoto University whose flash memory puts that of humans to shame. Based on research involving crows, dolphins, parrots, sheep, wasps, bats, whales, and of course chimpanzees and bonobos, Frans de Waal explores both the scope and the depth of animal intelligence. He offers a firsthand account of how science has stood traditional behaviorism on its head by revealing how smart animals really are, and how we’ve underestimated their abilities for too long. People often assume a cognitive ladder, from lower to higher forms, with our own intelligence at the top. But what if it is more like a bush, with cognition taking different forms that are often incomparable to ours? Would you presume yourself dumber than a squirrel because you’re less adept at recalling the locations of hundreds of buried acorns? Or would you judge your perception of your surroundings as more sophisticated than that of a echolocating bat? De Waal reviews the rise and fall of the mechanistic view of animals and opens our minds to the idea that animal minds are far more intricate and complex than we have assumed. De Waal’s landmark work will convince you to rethink everything you thought you knew about animal—and human—intelligence.

A Guide To Teaching Introductory Psychology

Author: Sandra Goss Lucas
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
ISBN: 9781405151511
Size: 31.78 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 3009
Download and Read
A Guide to Teaching Introductory Psychology focuses on the critical aspects of teaching introductory psychology to undergraduate students. It includes ideas, tips, and strategies for effectively teaching this course and provides useful answers to commonly asked questions. A concise and accessible guide to teaching introductory courses in Psychology Begins with an orienting history of the course· Evaluates current trends in teaching and offers suggestions for developing personal techniques Addresses a number of relevant issues, including how to teach difficult topics; linking course content to everyday experience; developing and using class presentations, lectures, and active learning ideas; and increasing interest in course topics Supported by a website that provides links to useful websites and handouts that instructors can use in their classes (www.blackwellpublishing.com/teachpsychscience/lucas)