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Iron Men

Author: David Waller
Publisher: Anthem Press
ISBN: 1783085460
Size: 58.59 MB
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In the early nineteenth century, Henry Maudslay, an engineer from a humble background, opened a factory in Westminster Bridge Road, a stone’s throw from the Thames. His workshop became in its day the equivalent of Google and Apple combined, attracting the country’s best in engineering talent. Their story of innovation and ambition tells how precision engineering made the industrial revolution possible, helping Great Britain become the workshop of the world.

Palmer Mills

Author: Roger Holden
Publisher: Lulu.com
ISBN: 099569771X
Size: 34.13 MB
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Palmer Mills were cotton spinning mills in Stockport, Cheshire. Originally built in around 1822 by James Marshall they were extended considerably over the following three decades. They ceased operating in the early 1880s, by which time they were old and obsolete. A new company purchased the mills and largely demolished them before building a new mill, which was completed in 1887. A second mill was completed in 1890. With the decline in the cotton industry, the mills closed in 1931. The No.1 Mill was demolished in 1937 but the No.2 Mill continued in various uses until it was demolished in 1999. This well illustrated book is a history and technical description of the mills in the context of the Lancashire cotton industry.

Life In The Iron Mills

Author: Rebecca Harding Davis
Publisher: Lulu.com
ISBN: 1365147150
Size: 37.34 MB
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Before Women Had Rights, They Worked - Regardless. Life in the Iron Mills is a short story (or novella) written by Rebecca Harding Davis in 1861, set in the factory world of the nineteenth century. It is one of the earliest American realist works, and is an important text for those who study labor and women's issues. It was immediately recognized as an innovative work, and introduced American readers to ""the bleak lives of industrial workers in the mills and factories of the nation."" Reviews: Life in the Iron Mills was initially published in The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 0007, Issue 42 in April 1861. After being published anonymously, both Emily Dickinson and Nathaniel Hawthorne praised the work. Elizabeth Stuart Phelps Ward was also greatly influenced by Davis's Life in the Iron Mills and in 1868 published in The Atlantic Monthly""The Tenth of January,"" based on the 1860 fire at the Pemberton Mills in Lawrence, Massachusetts. Get Your Copy Now.

The Most Powerful Idea In The World

Author: William Rosen
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226726347
Size: 32.78 MB
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"The Most Powerful Idea in the World argues that the very notion of intellectual property drove not only the invention of the steam engine but also the entire Industrial Revolution." -- Back cover.

All That Is Solid Melts Into Air

Author: Marshall Berman
Publisher: Verso
ISBN: 9780860917854
Size: 65.94 MB
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The experience of modernization -- the dizzying social changes that swept millions of people into the capitalist world -- and modernism in art, literature and architecture are brilliantly integrated in this account.

Imperial Germany And The Industrial Revolution

Author: Thorstein Veblen
Publisher: Cosimo, Inc.
ISBN: 159605882X
Size: 48.11 MB
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OF INTEREST TO: students of economics, readers of European historyThe traditions of the German people, including the personnel of the civil service, are traditions of frugality and parsimony... and these are fortifed in this connection by a traditional loyalty of service to a master, to whom the civil servant stands in a relation of personal stewardship.-from "Economic Policy of the Imperial State"One of the great thinkers of the early 20th century, American economist and sociologist THORSTEIN BUNDE VEBLEN (1857-1929) is best remembered for coining the phrase "conspicuous consumption" and, in this 1915 work, explaining how the stage was set for something like the Third Reich in Germany decades before its appearance. Veblen describes: . how the pagan past of the Germans gave rise to their modern character. how Germany's appropriation of industrial technology limited its cultural growth. how a medieval perspective endured in Germany into its imperial era. how the dominance of Prussia impacted Germany as a whole. and more.ALSO FROM COSIMO: Veblen's The Vested Interests and the Common Man, The Theory of Business Enterprise, and An Inquiry into the Nature of Peace and the Terms of Its Perpetuation

A Most Dangerous Book

Author: Christopher B. Krebs
Publisher: W W Norton & Company Incorporated
ISBN: 9780393342925
Size: 79.37 MB
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Traces the five-hundred year history and wide-ranging influence of the Roman historian's unflattering book about the ancient Germans that was eventually extolled by the Nazis as a bible.

What The Industrial Revolution Did For Us

Author: Gavin Weightman
Publisher: BBC Books
ISBN:
Size: 66.79 MB
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The latest in the popular What theDid For Us series of books, What the Industrial Revolution Did For Us is a journey back in time, giving the reader an insight into how British life was transformed between 1750 and 1830, and how it shaped the world we live in today. So what did the Industrial Revolution do for us? Without the huge advances in science, engineering and medicine and the cast of extraordinarily colourful inventors and scientists who revolutionised the way we think, our modern world would be very different. We would be without vaccinations against contagious diseases and have no anaesthetics for surgery. The industrial revolution also gave birth to our national obsession with tea drinking, the mass production of crockery for the house-proud newly emerging Middle Classes and the transformation of clothing worn by the ordinary man and woman. As well as huge leaps in the evolution of machinery and manufacturing, our transport system was completely overhauled as the first ever steam trains emerged, roads were drastically improved, and canal mania took over Britain. The great industrial cities burgeoned and London became the international power it still is today. From the quacks advertising their potions to the new Middle Classes to the great innovators and entrepreneurs such as Robert Stephenson, James Watt and Josiah Wedgwood, What the Industrial Revolution Did For Us takes us right to the heart of the excitement of this revolutionary age. This book and the BBC television series it accompanies takes us back in time in the eyes of the eighteenth century tourist embracing the newness and invention of this incredible era. Contents: Introduction by Dan Cruickshank Chapter 1: A Potent Brew Chapter 1 looks at the remarkable discoveries that, in just 100 years, created the modern global economy and much of the world in which we live. It tells the story of coal and iron, but also of tea, the invention of the toaster and how Kew Gardens came to be formed. Chapter 2: New Lives: New Landscapes How industrialisation changed the face of modern Britain with the development of machines that took work out of the home and into factories. Chapter 3: Steaming Along We travel through the longest tunnels, over the highest bridges and in the first ever steam trains to explore the impact of the Industrial Revolution on the way we get from A to B. Chapter 4: The Lure of London From the architecture of London to the development of shopping and the start of the modern consumer society. Chapter 5: A Remedy for Quacks Up until the mid 18th century, you had a better chance of survival if you chose not to visit a doctor. But these rather grim facts of life and death were about to change. The Industrial Revolution brought the hope that technology and progress might produce a world without disease and suffering. Modern Medicine covers everything from anaesthetic to Scurvy, vaccines to madness. Chapter 6: Cannon-Fire This chapter focuses on the developments taking place in warfare and weapons during this turbulent period.