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Keeping The Campfires Going

Author: Susan Applegate Krouse
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 0803226454
Size: 48.32 MB
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The essays in this groundbreaking anthology, Keeping the Campfires Going, highlight the accomplishments of and challenges confronting Native women activists in American and Canadian cities. Since World War II, Indigenous women from many communities have stepped forward through organizations, in their families, or by themselves to take action on behalf of the growing number of Native people living in urban areas. This collection recounts and assesses the struggles, successes, and legacies of several of these women in cities across North America, from San Francisco to Toronto, Vancouver to Chica.

Urban American Indians Reclaiming Native Space

Author: Donna Martinez
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 1440832080
Size: 67.76 MB
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An outstanding resource for contemporary American Indians as well as students and scholars interested in community and ethnicity, this book dispels the myth that all American Indians live on reservations and are plagued with problems, and serves to illustrate a unique, dynamic model of community formation. • Presents information on an important topic—the growing number of American Indians living in urban areas—and sheds light on cultural problems within the United States that are largely unknown to the average American • Familiarizes readers with the policies of the U.S. federal government that created diasporas, removals, reservations, and relocations for American Indians • Encourages readers to consider fresh perspectives on urban American histories and exposes readers to a thorough analysis of colonial space, race, resistance, and cultural endurance • Written by expert scholars and civic leaders who are themselves American Indian

Aboriginal Peoples In Canadian Cities

Author: Heather A. Howard
Publisher: Wilfrid Laurier Univ. Press
ISBN: 1554583144
Size: 15.83 MB
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Since the 1970s, Aboriginal people have been more likely to live in Canadian cities than on reserves or in rural areas. Aboriginal rural-to-urban migration and the development of urban Aboriginal communities represent one of the most significant shifts in the histories and cultures of Aboriginal peoples in Canada. The essays in Aboriginal Peoples in Canadian Cities: Transformations and Continuities are from contributors directly engaged in urban Aboriginal communities; they draw on extensive ethnographic research on and by Aboriginal people and their own lived experiences. The interdisciplinary studies of urban Aboriginal community and identity collected in this volume offer narratives of unique experiences and aspects of urban Aboriginal life. They provide innovative perspectives on cultural transformation and continuity and demonstrate how comparative examinations of the diversity within and across urban Aboriginal experiences contribute to broader understandings of the relationship between Aboriginal peoples and the Canadian state and to theoretical debates about power dynamics in the production of community and in processes of identity formation.

Pan Tribal Activism In The Pacific Northwest

Author: Vera Parham
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 1498559522
Size: 11.43 MB
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This study examines Native American protests in the Pacific Northwest during the 1960s and 1970s. It focuses on the successful occupation of Fort Lawton in 1970 and the creation of the Daybreak Star Indian Cultural Center in 1975, both of which the author frames within the larger history of Native American activism.

North American Indians In The Great War

Author: Susan Applegate Krouse
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 0803227787
Size: 69.19 MB
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More than twelve thousand American Indians served in the United States military in World War I, even though many were not U.S. citizens and did not enjoy the benefits of enfranchisement. Using the words of the veterans themselves, as collected by Joseph K. Dixon (1856?1926), North American Indians in the Great War presents the experiences of American Indian veterans during World War I and after their return home. ø Dixon, a photographer, author, and Indian rights advocate, had hoped that documenting American Indian service in the military would aid the Indian struggle to obtain general U.S. citizenship. Dixon managed to document nearly a quarter of the Indians who had served but was unable to complete his work, and his records languished unexamined until now. Unlike other sources of information on Indian military service collected by government officials, Dixon?s records come primarily from the veterans themselves. Their comments reveal pride in upholding an Indian tradition of military service as well as frustration with the U.S. government. Particularly in its immediacy and individuality, Dixon?s documentation of American Indian veterans of World War I adds greatly to our understanding of the experiences of American Indians in the U.S. military.