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Kitchen Culture In America

Author: Sherrie A. Inness
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 1512802883
Size: 76.81 MB
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At supermarkets across the nation, customers waiting in line—mostly female—flip through magazines displayed at the checkout stand. What we find on those magazine racks are countless images of food and, in particular, women: moms preparing lunch for the team, college roommates baking together, working women whipping up a meal in under an hour, dieters happy to find a lowfat ice cream that tastes great. In everything from billboards and product packaging to cooking shows, movies, and even sex guides, food has a presence that conveys powerful gender-coded messages that shape our society. Kitchen Culture in America is a collection of essays that examine how women's roles have been shaped by the principles and practice of consuming and preparing food. Exploring popular representations of food and gender in American society from 1895 to 1970, these essays argue that kitchen culture accomplishes more than just passing down cooking skills and well-loved recipes from generation to generation. Kitchen culture instructs women about how to behave like "correctly" gendered beings. One chapter reveals how juvenile cookbooks, a popular genre for over a century, have taught boys and girls not only the basics of cooking, but also the fine distinctions between their expected roles as grown men and women. Several essays illuminate the ways in which food manufacturers have used gender imagery to define women first and foremost as consumers. Other essays, informed by current debates in the field of material culture, investigate how certain commodities like candy, which in the early twentieth century was advertised primarily as a feminine pleasure, have been culturally constructed. The book also takes a look at the complex relationships among food, gender, class, and race or ethnicity-as represented, for example, in the popular Southern black Mammy figure. In all of the essays, Kitchen Culture in America seeks to show how food serves as a marker of identity in American society.

Cooking Lessons

Author: Sherrie A. Inness
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 9780742515741
Size: 17.51 MB
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Meatloaf, fried chicken, Jell-O, cake because foods are so very common, we rarely think about them much in depth. The authors of Cooking Lessons however, believe that food is deserving of our critical scrutiny and that such analysis yields many important lessons about American society and its values. This book explores the relationship between food and gender. Contributors draw from diverse sources, both contemporary and historical, and look at women from various cultural backgrounds, including Hispanic, traditional southern White, and African American. Each chapter focuses on a certain food, teasing out its cultural meanings and showing its effect on women's identity and lives. For example, food has often offered women a traditional way to gain power and influence in their households and larger communities. For women without access to other forms of creative expression, preparing a superior cake or batch of fried chicken was a traditional way to display their talent in an acceptable venue. On the other hand, foods and the stereotypes attached to them have also been used to keep women (and men, too) from different races, ethnicities, and social classes in their place."

From Betty Crocker To Feminist Food Studies

Author: Arlene Voski Avakian
Publisher: Liverpool University Press
ISBN: 9781558495111
Size: 20.90 MB
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Sheds light on the history of food, cooking, and eating. This collection of essays investigates the connections between food studies and women's studies. From women in colonial India to Armenian American feminists, these essays show how food has served as a means to assert independence and personal identity.

The Bloomsbury Handbook Of Food And Popular Culture

Author: Kathleen Lebesco
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 147429622X
Size: 76.51 MB
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The influence of food has grown rapidly as it has become more and more intertwined with popular culture in recent decades. The Bloomsbury Handbook of Food and Popular Culture offers an authoritative, comprehensive overview of and introduction to this growing field of research. Bringing together over 20 original essays from leading experts, including Amy Bentley, Deborah Lupton, Fabio Parasecoli, and Isabelle de Solier, its impressive breadth and depth serves to define the field of food and popular culture. Divided into four parts, the book covers: - Media and Communication; including film, television, print media, the Internet, and emerging media - Material Cultures of Eating; including eating across the lifespan, home cooking, food retail, restaurants, and street food - Aesthetics of Food; including urban landscapes, museums, visual and performance arts - Socio-Political Considerations; including popular discourses around food science, waste, nutrition, ethical eating, and food advocacy Each chapter outlines key theories and existing areas of research whilst providing historical context and considering possible future developments. The Editors' Introduction by Kathleen LeBesco and Peter Naccarato, ensures cohesion and accessibility throughout. A truly interdisciplinary, ground-breaking resource, this book makes an invaluable contribution to the study of food and popular culture. It will be an essential reference work for students, researchers and scholars in food studies, film and media studies, communication studies, sociology, cultural studies, and American studies.

Disco Divas

Author: Sherrie A. Inness
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 9780812218411
Size: 64.65 MB
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The 1970s tend to be allocated a slender role in American cultural and social history. The essays in Disco Divas reveal that the 1970s, far from being an era of cultural stasis, were a time of great social change, particularly for women.

Chop Suey Usa

Author: Yong Chen
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231538162
Size: 66.70 MB
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American diners began to flock to Chinese restaurants more than a century ago, making Chinese food the first mass-consumed cuisine in the United States. By 1980, it had become the country's most popular ethnic cuisine. Chop Suey, USA offers the first comprehensive interpretation of the rise of Chinese food, revealing the forces that made it ubiquitous in the American gastronomic landscape and turned the country into an empire of consumption. Engineered by a politically disenfranchised, numerically small, and economically exploited group, Chinese food's tour de America is an epic story of global cultural encounter. It reflects not only changes in taste but also a growing appetite for a more leisurely lifestyle. Americans fell in love with Chinese food not because of its gastronomic excellence but because of its affordability and convenience, which is why they preferred the quick and simple dishes of China while shunning its haute cuisine. Epitomized by chop suey, American Chinese food was a forerunner of McDonald's, democratizing the once-exclusive dining-out experience for such groups as marginalized Anglos, African Americans, and Jews. The rise of Chinese food is also a classic American story of immigrant entrepreneurship and perseverance. Barred from many occupations, Chinese Americans successfully turned Chinese food from a despised cuisine into a dominant force in the restaurant market, creating a critical lifeline for their community. Chinese American restaurant workers developed the concept of the open kitchen and popularized the practice of home delivery. They streamlined certain Chinese dishes, such as chop suey and egg foo young, turning them into nationally recognized brand names.

Mapping Appetite

Author: Jopi Nyman
Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing
ISBN: 1443808261
Size: 31.33 MB
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As recent years have witnessed a strong interest in the cultural representation of the culinary, ranging from analyses of food representation in film and literature to cultural readings of recipes, menus, national cuisines and celebrity chefs, the study of food narratives amidst contemporary consumer culture has become increasingly more important. This book seeks to respond to the challenge by presenting a series of case studies dealing with the representation of food and the culinary in a variety of cultural texts including post-colonial and popular fiction, women’s magazines and food writing. The contributors to the first part of the volume explore the various functions of food in post-colonial writing ranging from Salman Rushdie and Anita Desai to Zadie Smith and Maggie Gee in the context of globalization and multiculturalism. In the second part of the volume the focus is on two genres of popular fiction, the romantic novel and science fiction. While the romantic novels of Joanne Harris, for instance, link food and cooking with female empowerment, in science fiction food is connected with power and technology. The essays in the third part of the book explore the role of food in travel writing, women’s magazines and African American cookery books, showing how issues of gender, nation and race are present in food narratives.

Kleine Feuer Berall

Author: Celeste Ng
Publisher: Deutscher Taschenbuch Verlag
ISBN: 3423433809
Size: 20.14 MB
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Der zweite unvergessliche Roman der internationalen Bestsellerautorin Es brennt! In jedem der Schlafzimmer hat jemand Feuer gelegt. Fassungslos steht Elena Richardson im Bademantel und den Tennisschuhen ihres Sohnes draußen auf dem Rasen und starrt in die Flammen. Ihr ganzes Leben lang hatte sie die Erfahrung gemacht, »dass Leidenschaft so gefährlich ist wie Feuer«. Deshalb passte sie so gut nach Shaker Heights, den wohlhabenden Vorort von Cleveland, Ohio, in dem der Außenanstrich der Häuser ebenso geregelt ist wie das Alltagsleben seiner Bewohner. Ihr Mann ist Partner einer Anwaltskanzlei, sie selbst schreibt Kolumnen für die Lokalzeitung, die vier halbwüchsigen Kinder sind bis auf das jüngste, Isabel, wohlgeraten. Doch es brennt. Elenas scheinbar unanfechtbares Idyll – alles Asche und Rauch?