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Landscapes Of Privilege

Author: James S. Duncan
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9780415946889
Size: 62.14 MB
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Written by highly noted geographers from Cambridge University, this text focuses on a classic American suburb to show how the physical landscape functions as cultural code and marker of social exclusion.

Landscapes Of Privilege

Author: Nancy Duncan
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135939276
Size: 26.31 MB
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James and Nancy Duncan look at how the aesthetics of physical landscapes are fully enmeshed in producing the American class system. Focusing on an archetypal upper class American suburb-Bedford in Westchester County, NY-they show how the physical presentation of a place carries with it a range of markers of inclusion and exclusion.

Suburban Landscapes

Author: Paul H. Mattingly
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 9780801866807
Size: 54.76 MB
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In this work, Paul Mattingly provides a model for understanding suburban development through his narrative history of Leonia, New Jersey, an early commuter suburb of New York City.

Bulldozer Revolutions

Author: Andrew C. Baker
Publisher: University of Georgia Press
ISBN: 0820354155
Size: 49.14 MB
Format: PDF
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By examining the metropolitan fringes of Houston in Montgomery County, Texas, and Washington, D.C., in Loudoun County, Virginia, this book combines rural, environmental, and agricultural history to disrupt our view of the southern metropolis. Andrew C. Baker examines the local boosters, gentlemen farmers, historical preservationists, and nature-seeking suburbanites who abandoned the city to live in the metropolitan countryside during the twentieth century. These property owners formed the vanguard of the antigrowth movement that has defined metropolitan fringe politics across the nation. In the rural South, subdivisions, reservoirs, homesteads, and historical villages each obscured the troubling legacies of racism and rural poverty and celebrated a refashioned landscape. That landscape’s historical and environmental “authenticity” served as a foil to the alienation and ugliness of suburbia. Using a source base that includes the records of preservation organizations and local, state, and federal government agencies, as well as oral histories, Baker explores the distinct roots of the environmental politics and the shifting relationship between city and country within these metropolitan fringe regions.

Landscape And Race In The United States

Author: Richard Schein
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 113607810X
Size: 58.72 MB
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Landscape and Race in the United States is the definitive volume on racialized landscapes in the United States. Edited by Richard Schein, each essay is grounded in a particular location but all of the essays are informed by the theoretical vision that the cultural landscapes of America are infused with race and America's racial divide. While featuring the black/white divide, the book also investigates other social landscapes including Chinatowns, Latino landscapes in the Southwest and white suburban landscapes. The essays are accessible and readable providing historical and contemporary coverage.

The Making Of The American Landscape

Author: Michael P. Conzen
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317793692
Size: 37.98 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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The only compact yet comprehensive survey of environmental and cultural forces that have shaped the visual character and geographical diversity of the settled American landscape. The book examines the large-scale historical influences that have molded the varied human adaptation of the continent’s physical topography to its needs over more than 500 years. It presents a synoptic view of myriad historical processes working together or in conflict, and illustrates them through their survival in or disappearance from the everyday landscapes of today.

Landscape And The Ideology Of Nature In Exurbia

Author: K. Valentine Cadieux
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136193847
Size: 35.23 MB
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This book explores the role of the ideology of nature in producing urban and exurban sprawl. It examines the ironies of residential development on the metropolitan fringe, where the search for “nature” brings residents deeper into the world from which they are imagining their escape—of Federal Express, technologically mediated communications, global supply chains, and the anonymity of the global marketplace—and where many of the central features of exurbia—very low-density residential land use, monster homes, and conversion of forested or rural land for housing—contribute to the very problems that the social and environmental aesthetic of exurbia attempts to avoid. The volume shows how this contradiction—to live in the green landscape, and to protect the green landscape from urbanization—gets caught up and represented in the ideology of nature, and how this ideology, in turn, constitutes and is constituted by the landscapes being urbanized.

American Space American Place

Author: John A. Agnew
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
ISBN: 9780748613182
Size: 77.26 MB
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This book offers geographical perspectives on the condition of the U.S. at the outset of the 21st century. It compares American ideals of liberty, equality, opportunity and social improvement with the condition of the regions, states and localities.

Bodyspace

Author: Nancy Duncan
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134761007
Size: 56.50 MB
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BodySpace brings together some of the best known geographers writing on gender and sexuality today. Together they explore the role of space and place in the performance of gender and sexuality. The book takes a broad perspective on feminism as a theoretical critique, and aims to ground - and destabilize - notions of citizenship, work, violence, "race" and disability in their geographical contexts. The book explores the idea of knowledge as embodied, engendered and embedded in place and space. Gender and sexuality are explored - and destabilized - through the methodological and conceptual lenses of cartography, fieldwork, resistance, transgression and the divisions between local/global and public/private space. Contributors: Linda Martin Alcoff, Kay Anderson, Vera Chouinard, Nancy Duncan, J.K. Gibson-Graham, Ali Grant, Kathleen Kirby, Audrey Kobayashi, Doreen Massey, Linda McDowell, Wayne Myslik, Heidi Nast, Gillian Rose, Joanne Sharp, Matthew Sparke, Gill Valentine