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Latino Anglo Bargaining

Author: Christine Rack
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135485437
Size: 35.87 MB
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This book shows the mechanisms by which cultural differences reinforce structural privilege and disadvantage in the informal process of mediated negotiation. Are all people equally likely to pursue their own material self-interest in the negotiation process used in small claims mediation? Did Latinos and Anglos bargain more generously with members of their own group? The central questions, derived from theories of ethnic and gender differences, concerned how, and to what degree; culture, structure, and individual choice operated to alter the goals, bargaining process and outcomes, expressed motivations and outcome evaluations for outsider groups. This book demonstrates how there are real cultural differences in the way that Latinos and Anglos pursue monetary justice that defy dominant assumptions that all culture groups are equally likely to maximize their own outcomes at the expense of others.

The Promised Land

Author: Patricia L. Goerman
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135516790
Size: 44.46 MB
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Through analysis of in-depth interviews with seventy-three Hispanic immigrants in Central Virginia, this book offers a rare in-depth look at the views and circumstances of immigrants in a new receiving area. It provides an examination of the new migration trend including an analysis of immigrants' living and working conditions, their family life, and their plans for the future.

Media Worlds

Author: Faye D. Ginsburg
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520928164
Size: 75.81 MB
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This groundbreaking volume showcases the exciting work emerging from the ethnography of media, a burgeoning new area in anthropology that expands both social theory and ethnographic fieldwork to examine the way media—film, television, video—are used in societies around the globe, often in places that have been off the map of conventional media studies. The contributors, key figures in this new field, cover topics ranging from indigenous media projects around the world to the unexpected effects of state control of media to the local impact of film and television as they travel transnationally. Their essays, mostly new work produced for this volume, bring provocative new theoretical perspectives grounded in cross-cultural ethnographic realities to the study of media.

Internet And Society In Latin America And The Caribbean

Author: Gilles Cliche
Publisher: IDRC
ISBN: 9781552500170
Size: 50.54 MB
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This book presents pioneering research that is designed to show, from a qualitative and ethnographic perspective, how new information and communication technologies, as applied to the school system and to local governance initiatives, merely reproduce traditional pedagogical approaches and the dominant forms by which power is exercised at the local level. The studies thus constitute points of departure for further thinking about the need to promote an Internet culture based on the social application of a OC right to communication and cultureOCO and an OC Internet right, OCO that will permit the establishment of true citizen participation and free access to knowledge, with due regard to personal and individual rights such as those of privacy and intimacy."

The Roots Of Latino Urban Agency

Author: Sharon A. Navarro
Publisher: University of North Texas Press
ISBN: 1574415301
Size: 67.76 MB
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The 2010 U.S. Census data showed that over the last decade the Latino population grew from 35.3 million to 50.5 million, accounting for more than half of the nation’s population growth. The editors of The Roots of Latino Urban Agency, Sharon Navarro and Rodolfo Rosales, have collected essays that examine this phenomenal growth. The greatest demographic expansion of communities of Mexican Americans, Puerto Ricans, and Cuban Americans seeking political inclusion and access has been observed in Los Angeles, Miami, Chicago, and San Antonio. Three premises guide this study. The first premise holds that in order to understand the Latino community in all its diversity, the analysis has to begin at the grassroots level. The second premise maintains that the political future of the Latino community in the United States in the twenty-first century will be largely determined by the various roles they have played in the major urban centers across the nation. The third premise argues that across the urban political landscape the Latino community has experienced different political formations, strategies and ultimately political outcomes in their various urban settings. These essays collectively suggest that political agency can encompass everything from voting, lobbying, networking, grassroots organizing, and mobilization, to dramatic protest. Latinos are in fact gaining access to the same political institutions that worked so hard to marginalize them.

Imagined Transnationalism

Author: K. Concannon
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 0230103324
Size: 80.15 MB
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With its focus on Latina/o communities in the United States, this collection of essays identifies and investigates the salient narrative and aesthetic strategies with which an individual or a collective represents transnational experiences and identities in literary and cultural texts.

Understanding Criminal Justice

Author: Philip Daniel Smith
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 9780761940326
Size: 53.20 MB
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Providing an overview of the sociological approaches to law and criminal justice, this book focuses on how law and the criminal justice system inevitably affect one another, and the ways in which both are intimately connected with wider social forces.

Liberation Theology In Chicana O Literature

Author: Alma Rosa Alvarez
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135915474
Size: 37.36 MB
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Liberation Theology in Chicana/o Literature looks at the ways in which Chicana/o authors who have experienced cultural disconnection or marginalization because of their gender, gender politics and sexual orientation attempt to forge a connection back to Chicana/o culture through their use of liberation theology.

Political Order In Changing Societies

Author: Samuel P. Huntington
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300116205
Size: 22.86 MB
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This now classic examination of the development of viable political institutions in emerging nations is an enduring contribution to modern political analysis. The foreword by Fukuyama assesses Huntingdon's achievement.

How The Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents

Author: Julia Alvarez
Publisher: Algonquin Books
ISBN: 1616200987
Size: 44.31 MB
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“Simply wonderful.” —Los Angeles Times Acclaimed writer Julia Alvarez’s brilliant and buoyant and beloved first novel gives voice to four sisters recounting their adventures growing up in two cultures. Selected as a Notable Book by both the New York Times and the American Library Association, it won the PEN Oakland/Josephine Miles Award for books with a multicultural perspective and was chosen by New York librarians as one of twenty-one classics for the twenty-first century. Ms. Alvarez was recently honored with the 2013 National Medal of Arts for her extraordinary storytelling. In this debut novel, the García sisters—Carla, Sandra, Yolanda, and Sofía—and their family must flee their home in the Dominican Republic after their father’s role in an attempt to overthrow a tyrannical dictator is discovered. They arrive in New York City in 1960 to a life far removed from their existence in the Caribbean. In the wild and wondrous and not always welcoming U.S.A., their parents try to hold on to their old ways, but the girls try find new lives: by forgetting their Spanish, by straightening their hair and wearing fringed bell bottoms. For them, it is at once liberating and excruciating to be caught between the old world and the new. How the García Girls Lost Their Accents sets the sisters free to tell their most intimate stories about how they came to be at home—and not at home—in America. “A joy to read.” —The Cleveland Plain Dealer