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The Ethos Of The Hong Kong Chinese

Author: Zhaojia Liu
Publisher: Chinese University Press
ISBN: 9789622014312
Size: 43.59 MB
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Like the cracking of the genetic code and the creation of the atomic bomb, the discovery of how the brain's neurons work is one of the fundamental scientific developments of the twentieth century. The discovery of neurotransmitters revolutionized the way we think about the brain and what it means to be human yet few people know how they were discovered, the scientists involved, or the fierce controversy about whether they even existed. The War of the Soups and the Sparks tells the saga of the dispute between the pharmacologists, who had uncovered the first evidence that nerves communicate by releasing chemicals, and the neurophysiologists, experts on the nervous system, who dismissed the evidence and remained committed to electrical explanations. The protagonists of this story are Otto Loewi and Henry Dale, who received Nobel Prizes for their work, and Walter Cannon, who would have shared the prize with them if he had not been persuaded to adopt a controversial theory (how that happened is an important part of this history). Valenstein sets his story of scientific discovery against the backdrop of two world wars and examines the fascinating lives of several scientists whose work was affected by the social and political events of their time. He recounts such stories as Loewi's arrest by Nazi storm troopers and Dale's efforts at helping key scientists escape Germany. The War of the Soups and the Sparks reveals how science and scientists work. Valenstein describes the observations and experiments that led to the discovery of neurotransmitters and sheds light on what determines whether a novel concept will gain acceptance among the scientific community. His work also explains the immense importance of Loewi, Dale, and Cannon's achievements in our understanding of the human brain and the way mental illnesses are conceptualized and treated.

The Limits Of The Rule Of Law In China

Author: Karen G. Turner
Publisher: University of Washington Press
ISBN: 0295803894
Size: 11.25 MB
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In The Limits of the Rule of Law in China, fourteen authors from different academic disciplines reflect on questions that have troubled Chinese and Western scholars of jurisprudence since classical times. Using data from the early 19th century through the contemporary period, they analyze how tension between formal laws and discretionary judgment is discussed and manifested in the Chinese context. The contributions cover a wide range of topics, from interpreting the rationale for and legacy of Qing practices of collective punishment, confession at trial, and bureaucratic supervision to assessing the political and cultural forces that continue to limit the authority of formal legal institutions in the People�s Republic of China.

Reform Legitimacy And Dilemmas

Author: Wang Gungwu
Publisher: World Scientific
ISBN: 9814492264
Size: 30.11 MB
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How has China's post-Deng leadership governed the country? How have the changing social and political environments shifted the bases of political legitimacy? What strategies has Jiang Zemin adopted to cope with new circumstances in order to strengthen his leadership? What are the challenges these new reform measures have generated for the leadership? And how have domestic concerns constrained the leadership's intention in China's foreign relations? These are some of the questions which this volume attempts to address. The authors agree that Jiang Zemin is not a man without any political initiative. He has struggled to establish his own style of leadership, and to strengthen the legitimacy of his leadership by setting forth new rules and institutions for political games and by finding new measures to cope with new challenges. This collection of articles shows the success Jiang and his colleagues have had in strengthening their leadership; how the different reform measures have strengthened Jiang's rule; and how the ongoing reform has created new challenges for his regime. Contents:Party, State, and Society:The Politics of Power Succession (Y-N Zheng)The Chinese Communist Party in the Countryside (I Wobowo)State Corporatism and Civil Society (E X Gu)The Religio-Political Significance of Falun Gong and Jiang Zemin's Legacy of Social Stability (W T Liu)The Rule by Law vs the Rule of Law (Y-N Zheng)Social Reform and Challenges:Labor Law for Foreign Investment Enterprises in China (V I Lo)The Political Economy of Public Housing Reform (E X Gu)Conflicts between Societal Desire and Individual Responsibility: Financing Issues in China's Urban Health Insurance Reform (W Yu)China's Growing Concerns over Its Environmental Problems (Y-Q Tong)Domestic Responses to External Relations:The Politics of Human Rights: Stability First, Development Second, and Everything Else Can Wait (L L P Gore)China's Dialogue with the West on Rights: Is There Any Common Ground? (V I Lo)Nationalism and Its Dilemma: Chinese Responses to Embassy Bombing (J Wong & Y-N Zheng)China's Strategic Intentions and Demands: What Is New? (F-L Wang) Readership: General. Keywords:Reviews:“The book is a welcome addition to the study of contemporary Chinese politics, especially in the post-Deng era. Students of contemporary China are likely to find the book useful in apprising them of several key recent developments facing Chinese politics and policy reform. General readers interested in the Chinese reform will also find it informative and accessible.”The Journal of Asian Studies

The Changing Chinese Legal System 1978 Present

Author: Bin Liang
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135903239
Size: 78.71 MB
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This groundbreaking book examines the changing Chinese legal system since 1978. In addition to historical analyses of changes at the economic, political-legal, and social levels, Liang gives special attention to crime and punishment functions of the legal system, and the current judicial system based on field research, i.e., court observations in both Beijing and Chengdu. The court system has been in a process of systemization, both internally and externally, seeking more power and relative independence. However, traditional influences, such as preference of mediation (over litigation) and substantive justice (over procedural justice), and lack of respect (from the masses) and guaranteed power (from the political structure), still have major impacts on the building and operation of the judicial system. Liang also shrewdly places the Chinese legal and political reform within the global system. This book, which reshapes our understanding of the economic, political, and essentially legal changes in China within the global context, will be crucial reading for scholars of Asia, law, criminal justice, and sociology.

Women S Rights

Author: Lynn Walter
Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group
ISBN: 9780313308901
Size: 75.63 MB
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A cross-cultural historical and contemporary exploration of women's rights issues and activisim in fifteen case studies of nations from around the world.

Political Reform In Post Mao China

Author: Barrett L. McCormick
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520067653
Size: 26.12 MB
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Since the death of Mao the leadership of the Chinese Communist Party has embarked on a series of ambitious political reforms. In his new book, Barrett McCormick develops a theory of Leninist states to explore the prospect for these reforms. He finds that, while significant economic and political gains have been made for the Chinese people, the basic contours of the state remain unchanged; and as events in June 1989 clearly showed, reform has not diminished the state's ability to impose its perogatives on society. Drawing on Weber's political sociology, McCormick argues that patronage and corruption are integral aspects of Leninist rulership. Reformers have attempted to promote democracy and law and to fight corruption, but when they attempt to implement their programs through traditional hierarchical Leninist institutions, lower-level cadres have been able to utilize patronage networks to blunt the impact of reform and protect their personal agenda. In his case studies of the legal system, the people's congress, and party rectification, McCormick points up these obstacles to progressive change and assesses the extent to which reformers' goals have been realized. He shows that, despite the often radical nature of the reform movements, the principal dimensions of the Leninist system--one party rule, state domination of the economy, a confining ideology--remain largely intact. These findings will be of interest to China specialists as well as students of comparative communism and Leninist states. Since the death of Mao the leadership of the Chinese Communist Party has embarked on a series of ambitious political reforms. In his new book, Barrett McCormick develops a theory of Leninist states to explore the prospect for these reforms. He finds that, while significant economic and political gains have been made for the Chinese people, the basic contours of the state remain unchanged; and as events in June 1989 clearly showed, reform has not diminished the state's ability to impose its perogatives on society. Drawing on Weber's political sociology, McCormick argues that patronage and corruption are integral aspects of Leninist rulership. Reformers have attempted to promote democracy and law and to fight corruption, but when they attempt to implement their programs through traditional hierarchical Leninist institutions, lower-level cadres have been able to utilize patronage networks to blunt the impact of reform and protect their personal agenda. In his case studies of the legal system, the people's congress, and party rectification, McCormick points up these obstacles to progressive change and assesses the extent to which reformers' goals have been realized. He shows that, despite the often radical nature of the reform movements, the principal dimensions of the Leninist system--one party rule, state domination of the economy, a confining ideology--remain largely intact. These findings will be of interest to China specialists as well as students of comparative communism and Leninist states.