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Leading On Inclusion

Author: John Cornwall
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 0415676215
Size: 10.88 MB
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This title critically examines the current theory and legislative context of special educational needs and disability, and explores the enduring issues and opportunities that will affect future practice in all schools.

Special Educational Needs Inclusion And Diversity

Author: Norah Frederickson
Publisher: McGraw-Hill Education (UK)
ISBN: 033523951X
Size: 64.68 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Special Educational Needs, Inclusion and Diversity is the definitive handbook for student teachers, newly qualified teachers, trainee educational psychologists, SENCO's and SEN Specialist Teachers.

Testing And Inclusive Schooling

Author: Bjorn Hamre
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 135178983X
Size: 25.20 MB
Format: PDF
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Testing and Inclusive Schooling provides a comparative perspective on seemingly incompatible global agendas and efforts to include all children in the general school system, thus reducing exclusion. With an examination of the international testing culture and the politics of inclusion currently permeating national school reforms, this book raises a critical and constructive discussion of these movements, which appear to support one another, yet simultaneously offer profound contradictions. With contributions from around the world, the book analyses the dilemma arising between reforms that urge schools to move towards a constantly higher academic level, and those who practice a politics of inclusion leading to a greater degree of student diversity. The book considers the types of problems that arise when reforms implemented at the international level are transformed into policies and practices, firmly placing global educational efforts into perspective by highlighting a range of different cases at both national and local levels. Testing and Inclusive Schooling sheds light on new possibilities for educational improvements in global and local contexts and is essential reading for academics, researchers and postgraduate students interested in international and comparative education, assessment technologies and practices, inclusion, educational psychology and educational policy.

Dilemmas Of Difference Inclusion And Disability

Author: Brahm Norwich
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134150881
Size: 38.75 MB
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**Shortlisted for the nasen Special Educational Needs Academic Book award 2008** Inclusion has become very influential internationally in the field of schooling. This has involved the introduction of policies that pursue more provision for, and acceptance of, students with special educational needs or disabilities in ordinary school settings. However, these policies represent different and often conflicting values and approaches to education. The basic dilemma of difference is whether to recognise or not to recognise differences, as either way there are negative implications or risks associated with stigma, devaluation, rejection or denial of relevant opportunities. This is the first book to examine ideas about these dilemmas from a range of disciplines and fields about the nature and origins of such dilemmas as they apply to special and inclusive education. In particular these dilemmas are about: identification – whether to identify students as having special educational needs / disabilities or not? curriculum – how much of a common curriculum is relevant to these students? placement – can appropriate learning can take place in ordinary schools and classes or not? This ground-breaking book examines professional educators and administrators at national and local authority level across three countries – England, USA and the Netherlands – and questions how they recognise tensions or dilemmas in responding to student differences. Of interest to researchers, students, academics and professionals, this study will provide a much needed, balanced and powerful contribution to the inclusion debate.

New Perspectives On Environmental Justice

Author: Rachel Stein
Publisher: Rutgers University Press
ISBN: 0813534275
Size: 48.15 MB
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Women make up the vast majority of activists and organizers of grassroots movements fighting against environmental ills that threaten poor and people of color communities. New Perspectives on Environmental Justice is the first collection of essays that pays tribute to the enormous contributions women have made in these endeavors. The writers offer varied examples of environmental justice issues such as children's environmental health campaigns, cancer research, AIDS/HIV activism, the Environmental Genome Project, and popular culture, among many others. Each one focuses on gender and sexuality as crucial factors in women's or gay men's activism and applies environmental justice principles to related struggles for sexual justice. The contributors represent a wide variety of activist and scholarly perspectives including law, environmental studies, sociology, political science, history, medical anthropology, American studies, English, African and African American studies, women's studies, and gay and lesbian studies, offering multiple vantage points on gender, sexuality, and activism. Feminist/womanist impulses shape and sustain environmental justice movements around the world, making an understanding of gender roles and differences crucial for the success of these efforts.

The Selfish Gene

Author: Richard Dawkins
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780192860927
Size: 17.80 MB
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An ethologist shows man to be a gene machine whose world is one of savage competition and deceit

Managing Diversity And Inclusion

Author: Jawad Syed
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 1473927625
Size: 14.94 MB
Format: PDF
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*Shortlisted in the Management and Leadership Textbook Category at CMI Management Book of the Year Awards 2016* Instructors - Electronic inspection copies are available or contact your local sales representative for an inspection copy of the print version. Managing Diversity and Inclusion: an International Perspective is a hotly anticipated new text that has been written by an international team of experts and offers an in-depth and contextual account of enduring, contemporary and cutting edge theories and approaches to diversity and inclusion management. The book uniquely situates UK and European policies and practices of various dimensions of diversity firmly within the global context through an international and cross-cultural range of case studies and considers how national contexts have shaped the field. Key features: International and cross-cultural case studies, examples and comparisons from a range of countries including the emerging economies Case study approach illuminates complex theories by showing how they are applied in practice Criticality is central to the book with each chapter including critical analysis, critical questions and boxed critical insights and reflections Companion website with free full text journal articles. Visit study.sagepub.com/syed

The Diversity Bargain

Author: Natasha K. Warikoo
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022640028X
Size: 48.67 MB
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We’ve heard plenty from politicians and experts on affirmative action and higher education, about how universities should intervene—if at all—to ensure a diverse but deserving student population. But what about those for whom these issues matter the most? In this book, Natasha K. Warikoo deeply explores how students themselves think about merit and race at a uniquely pivotal moment: after they have just won the most competitive game of their lives and gained admittance to one of the world’s top universities. What Warikoo uncovers—talking with both white students and students of color at Harvard, Brown, and Oxford—is absolutely illuminating; and some of it is positively shocking. As she shows, many elite white students understand the value of diversity abstractly, but they ignore the real problems that racial inequality causes and that diversity programs are meant to solve. They stand in fear of being labeled a racist, but they are quick to call foul should a diversity program appear at all to hamper their own chances for advancement. The most troubling result of this ambivalence is what she calls the “diversity bargain,” in which white students reluctantly agree with affirmative action as long as it benefits them by providing a diverse learning environment—racial diversity, in this way, is a commodity, a selling point on a brochure. And as Warikoo shows, universities play a big part in creating these situations. The way they talk about race on campus and the kinds of diversity programs they offer have a huge impact on student attitudes, shaping them either toward ambivalence or, in better cases, toward more productive and considerate understandings of racial difference. Ultimately, this book demonstrates just how slippery the notions of race, merit, and privilege can be. In doing so, it asks important questions not just about college admissions but what the elite students who have succeeded at it—who will be the world’s future leaders—will do with the social inequalities of the wider world.

The Citizen And The Alien

Author: Linda Bosniak
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9781400827510
Size: 59.49 MB
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Citizenship presents two faces. Within a political community it stands for inclusion and universalism, but to outsiders, citizenship means exclusion. Because these aspects of citizenship appear spatially and jurisdictionally separate, they are usually regarded as complementary. In fact, the inclusionary and exclusionary dimensions of citizenship dramatically collide within the territory of the nation-state, creating multiple contradictions when it comes to the class of people the law calls aliens--transnational migrants with a status short of full citizenship. Examining alienage and alienage law in all of its complexities, The Citizen and the Alien explores the dilemmas of inclusion and exclusion inherent in the practices and institutions of citizenship in liberal democratic societies, especially the United States. In doing so, it offers an important new perspective on the changing meaning of citizenship in a world of highly porous borders and increasing transmigration. As a particular form of noncitizenship, alienage represents a powerful lens through which to examine the meaning of citizenship itself, argues Linda Bosniak. She uses alienage to examine the promises and limits of the "equal citizenship" ideal that animates many constitutional democracies. In the process, she shows how core features of globalization serve to shape the structure of legal and social relationships at the very heart of national societies.