Download lessons from mount kilimanjaro schooling community and gender in east africa in pdf or read lessons from mount kilimanjaro schooling community and gender in east africa in pdf online books in PDF, EPUB and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to get lessons from mount kilimanjaro schooling community and gender in east africa in pdf book now. This site is like a library, Use search box in the widget to get ebook that you want.



Lessons From Mount Kilimanjaro

Author: Amy Stambach
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135959234
Size: 60.27 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 698
Download and Read
First Published in 2000. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Faith In Schools

Author: Amy Stambach
Publisher: Stanford University Press
ISBN: 0804773459
Size: 39.90 MB
Format: PDF
View: 2050
Download and Read
American Evangelicals have long considered Africa a welcoming place for joining faith with social action, but their work overseas is often ambivalently received. Even among East African Christians who share missionaries' religious beliefs, understandings vary over the promises and pitfalls of American Evangelical involvement in public life and schools. In this first-hand account, Amy Stambach examines missionary involvement in East Africa from the perspectives of both Americans and East Africans. While Evangelicals frame their work in terms of spreading Christianity, critics see it as destroying traditional culture. Challenging assumptions on both sides, this work reveals a complex and ever-evolving exchange between Christian college campuses in the U.S., where missionaries train, and schools in Kenya, Uganda, and Tanzania. Providing real insight into the lives of school children in East Africa, this book charts a new course for understanding the goals on both sides and the global connections forged in the name of faith.

Education And Gender

Author: Debotri Dhar
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 1472505956
Size: 31.85 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 5582
Download and Read
Education and Gender draws on international research from the USA, the UK, India, Mexico, Sub-Saharan Africa and the Caribbean, to provide a comprehensive global overview of the relationship between gender and education. Rooting constructions of gender and sexuality in specific geographical contexts, the contributors consider a range of issues. Themes discussed include the gender gap in educational attainment; pedagogical strategies; stereotyping in curricula; and education policy. Drawing on best practices worldwide, the contributors identify the current gaps and propose solutions to promote gender-just, equitable and pluralistic societies. Each chapter includes key questions to encourage active engagement with the subject and a list of further reading to support taking the exploration further.

The Oxford Handbook Of Modern African History

Author: John Parker
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191667552
Size: 80.26 MB
Format: PDF
View: 1151
Download and Read
The Oxford Handbook of Modern African History represents an invaluable tool for historians and others in the field of African studies. This collection of essays, produced by some of the finest scholars currently working in the field, provides the latest insights into, and interpretations of, the history of Africa - a continent with a rich and complex past. An understanding of this past is essential to gain perspective on Africa's current challenges, and this accessible and comprehensive volume will allow readers to explore various aspects - political, economic, social, and cultural - of the continent's history over the last two hundred years. Since African history first emerged as a serious academic endeavour in the 1950s and 1960s, it has undergone numerous shifts in terms of emphasis and approach, changes brought about by political and economic exigencies and by ideological debates. This multi-faceted Handbook is essential reading for anyone with an interest in those debates, and in Africa and its peoples. While the focus is determinedly historical, anthropology, geography, literary criticism, political science and sociology are all employed in this ground-breaking study of Africa's past.

Uhuru Peak Kilimanjaro

Author: Institut zur Erforschung und Fr̲derung Österreichischer und Internationaler Literaturprozesse Wien
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 31.72 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 3983
Download and Read

Desire And Decline

Author: Frances Katherine Vavrus
Publisher: Peter Lang Pub Incorporated
ISBN: 9780820463117
Size: 64.34 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 5477
Download and Read
<I>Desire and Decline explores the privileged place of education in local, national, and global development discourses about population, HIV/AIDS, and environmental conservation. -Desire- signals the global consensus on the view that education is central to solving problems of development. -Decline-, on the other hand, draws attention to the growing gap between those who have access to basic social services - such as education - and those who do not. Based on multiple periods of fieldwork on Mount Kilimanjaro, Frances Vavrus links local and global narratives about the potential of education to enhance development but also reveals its limitations in postcolonial countries experiencing the pressures of globalization. Vavrus concludes with portraits of local development initiatives that leave readers with a clear sense of the complexity of education's role in development, and the importance of political economic analysis for global population, health, and environmental policy."

School Reform In A Global Society

Author: William Edwin Segall
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Pub Inc
ISBN: 9780742524606
Size: 45.46 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 476
Download and Read
This far reaching text, explores the relations between global wealth and poverty, American and European elites and Third World indigenous societies, and the role schools play in the destruction of cultures. It exams how the dark underside of capitalism, called neoliberalism, is using schools to destroy an American generation and why the No Child Left Behind Act is replacing the democracy of Roosevelt and Dewey with Victorian classism.

Generations Past

Author: Andrew Burton
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 63.31 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 1895
Download and Read
Contemporary Africa is demographically characterized above all else by its youthfulness. In East Africa the median age of the population is now a striking 17.5 years, and more than 65 percent of the population is age 24 or under. This situation has attracted growing scholarly attention, resulting in an important and rapidly expanding literature on the position of youth in African societies. While the scholarship examining the contemporary role of youth in African societies is rich and growing, the historical dimension has been largely neglected in the literature thus far. Generations Past seeks to address this gap through a wide-ranging selection of essays that covers an array of youth-related themes in historical perspective. Thirteen chapters explore the historical dimensions of youth in nineteenth-, twentieth-, and twenty-first–century Ugandan, Tanzanian, and Kenyan societies. Key themes running through the book include the analytical utility of youth as a social category; intergenerational relations and the passage of time; youth as a social and political problem; sex and gender roles among East African youth; and youth as historical agents of change. The strong list of contributors includes prominent scholars of the region, and the collection encompasses a good geographical spread of all three East African countries.

Africa After Gender

Author: Catherine M. Cole
Publisher: Indiana University Press
ISBN:
Size: 14.96 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 1757
Download and Read
Gender is one of the most productive, dynamic, and vibrant areas of Africanist research today. But what is the meaning of gender in an African context? Why does gender usually connote women? Why has gender taken hold in Africa when feminism hasn’t? Is gender yet another Western construct that has been applied to Africa however ill-suited and riddled with assumptions? Africa After Gender? looks at Africa now that gender has come into play to consider how the continent, its people, and the term itself have changed. Leading Africanist historians, anthropologists, literary critics, and political scientists move past simple dichotomies, entrenched debates, and polarizing identity politics to present an evolving discourse of gender. They show gender as an applied rather than theoretical tool and discuss themes such as the performance of sexuality, lesbianism, women’s political mobilization, the work of gendered NGOs, and the role of masculinity in a gendered world. For activists, students, and scholars, this book reveals a rich and cross-disciplinary view of the status of gender in Africa today. Contributors are Hussaina J. Abdullah, Nwando Achebe, Susan Andrade, Eileen Boris, Catherine M. Cole, Paulla A. Ebron, Eileen Julien, Lisa A. Lindsay, Adrienne MacIain, Takyiwaa Manuh, Stephan F. Miescher, Helen Mugambi, Gay Seidman, Sylvia Tamale, Bridget Teboh, Lynn M. Thomas, and Nana Wilson-Tagoe.