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Living The World War

Author: Donald N. Zillman
Publisher: Vandeplas Pub.
ISBN: 9781600422782
Size: 48.22 MB
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A century ago Americans entered and fought 'a war to end all wars.' In Living the World War: A Weekly Exploration of the American Experience in World War I we use the Congressional Record and the New York Times to see how an American citizen of that era would have experienced the World War without knowing what would come next. In addition to the War, Americans living during the weeks of October 1, 1916 to December 31, 1917 also debated women's suffrage, race relations, Prohibition, the rights of organized labor, reconciliation of North and South, and coal and fuel shortages. That experience of war, and the emerging national issues, profoundly shape America in the 21st century. Donald N. Zillman is the Edward Godfrey Professor of Law at the University of Maine School of Law. He majored in history at the University of Wisconsin and graduated from the Wisconsin (JD) and the Virginia Law Schools (LLM). In his career he served as an Army Judge Advocate officer and a professor of law at Arizona State University and the University of Utah before coming to Maine as the Dean of the University of Maine Law School. He also served as the President of the University of Maine at Presque Isle and as a visiting professor at the United States Military Academy at West Point and the University of Southampton (UK). His writings have focused on military law, energy law, and tort law. Elizabeth Elsbach received her JD from the University of Maine Law School in 2016. She majored in history, political science, and English at Saint Mary's College in South Bend, Indiana. During her time at Saint Mary's she lived abroad in Innsbruck, Austria where she immersed herself in the cultures, the languages, and the history of Europe. While in Law School, Elizabeth collaborated on an article on energy and natural resources for the Oxford University Press in addition to co-authoring Living the World War. She is pursuing a career in intellectual property law. The authors are law trained by profession and amateur historians by avocation. We bring the differing perspectives of men and women, military veteran and non-veteran, baby boom generation and millennial generation to our work. Join us in the experience of "Living the World War."

Living The World War

Author: Donald N. Zillman
Publisher: Vandeplas Pub.
ISBN: 9781600422959
Size: 36.52 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 1702
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A century ago Americans entered and fought 'a war to end all wars.' In Living the World War: A Weekly Exploration of the American Experience in World War I we use the Congressional Record and the New York Times to see how an American citizen of that era would have experienced the World War without knowing what would come next. In addition to the War, Americans living during the weeks of October 1, 1916 to December 31, 1917 also debated women's suffrage, race relations, Prohibition, the rights of organized labor, reconciliation of North and South, and coal and fuel shortages. That experience of war, and the emerging national issues, profoundly shape America in the 21st century.

Freedom Struggles

Author: Adriane Danette Lentz-Smith
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674054180
Size: 18.12 MB
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For many of the 200,000 black soldiers sent to Europe with the American Expeditionary Forces in World War I, encounters with French civilians and colonial African troops led them to imagine a world beyond Jim Crow. They returned home to join activists working to make that world real. In narrating the efforts of African American soldiers and activists to gain full citizenship rights as recompense for military service, Adriane Lentz-Smith illuminates how World War I mobilized a generation.

Uprooted

Author: Albert Marrin
Publisher: Knopf Books for Young Readers
ISBN: 0553509365
Size: 65.10 MB
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Discusses the internment of Japanese American citizens during the Second World War.

The First World War

Author: William Kelleher Storey
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 144222682X
Size: 43.70 MB
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In a compact but comprehensive and clear narrative, this book explores the First World War from a genuinely global perspective. Putting a human face on the war, William Kelleher Storey takes into account individual decisions and experiences as well as environmental and technological factors, such as food, geography, manpower, and weapons. With reorganized chapters designed to enhance classroom use, this edition brings the text up to date with current scholarship and new maps for the Great War's centennial. The author argues that the Great War profoundly changed the ways in which people imagined the landscape around them and thought about technology and the environment. Before the war, Europe and its colonies generally regarded industrial technology as an instrument of modernity; the landscape existed to be conquered, divided, and ruled. During and after the war, the costs of conquest became much higher, raising significant doubts about the value of progress. Soldiers experienced profound personal degradation, physical injuries, and mental collapse in the midst of nightmarish, technologically induced environmental conditions, which they vividly remembered when they formed new identities in the postwar world. Although people did not abandon thoughts of technological advance, after the war they had a keener sense of modernity’s costs. Without neglecting traditional themes, Storey’s deft interweaving of the role of environment and technology enriches our understanding of the social, political, and military history of the war, not only in Europe, but worldwide.

Japanese American Internment During World War Ii A History And Reference Guide

Author: Wendy Ng
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 0313096554
Size: 62.49 MB
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The internment of thousands of Japanese Americans during World War II is one of the most shameful episodes in American history. This history and reference guide will help students and other interested readers to understand the history of this action and its reinterpretation in recent years, but it will also help readers to understand the Japanese American wartime experience through the words of those who were interned. Why did the U.S. government take this extraordinary action? How was the evacuation and resettlement handled? How did Japanese Americans feel on being asked to leave their homes and live in what amounted to concentration camps? How did they respond, and did they resist? What developments have taken place in the last twenty years that have reevaluated this wartime action? A variety of materials is provided to assist readers in understanding the internment experience. Six interpretive essays examine key aspects of the event and provide new interpretations based on the most recent scholarship. Essays include: - A short narrative history of the Japanese in America before World War II - The evacuation - Life within barbed wire-the assembly and relocation centers - The question of loyalty-Japanese Americans in the military and draft resisters - Legal challenges to the evacuation and internment - After the war-resettlement and redress A chronology of events, 26 biographical profiles of important figures, the text of 10 key primary documents--from Executive Order 9066, which authorized the internment camps, to first-person accounts of the internment experience--a glossary of terms, and an annotative bibliography of recommended print sources and web sites provide ready reference value. Every library should update its resources on World War II with this history and reference guide.

World War I And American Art

Author: Robert Cozzolino
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 0691172692
Size: 68.20 MB
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"World War I and American Art provides an unprecedented look at the ways in which American artists reacted to the war. Artists took a leading role in chronicling the war, crafting images that influenced public opinion, supported mobilization efforts, and helped to shape how the war's appalling human toll was memorialized. The book brings together paintings, drawings, prints, photographs, posters, and ephemera, spanning the diverse visual culture of the period to tell the story of a crucial turning point in the history of American art"--

World War Ii And The Postwar Years In America

Author: William H. Young
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 9780313356520
Size: 20.28 MB
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More than 150 articles provide a revealing look at one of the most tempestuous decades in recent American history, describing the everyday activities of Americans as they dealt first with war, and then a difficult transition to peace and prosperity. * Approximately 175 A–Z entries on everyday life and popular culture in the United States, 1940–1950 * An extensive timeline of events during the covered decade * Numerous photographs that highlight article content * Charts listing pertinent statistics and/or related information * Selected readings accompanying each article * An extensive bibliography of print, aural, and electronic resources and a guide to related topics

History Of Asian Americans Exploring Diverse Roots

Author: Jonathan H. X. Lee
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 0313384592
Size: 14.24 MB
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A comprehensive, compelling, and clearly written title that provides a rich examination of the history of Asians in the United States, covering well-established Asian American groups as well as emerging ones such as the Burmese, Bhutanese, and Tibetan American communities. • Examines Asian migration to the United States and the resulting formation of diverse Asian American communities that include Cambodian, Chinese, Filipino, Hmong, Japanese, Korean, Laotian, South Asian, and Vietnamese and new emerging Asian American communities such as the Burmese, Bhutanese, and Tibetan American • Compares 19th-century Asian American history in Hawaii with that on the American mainland • Employs racialization and push-pull theories as well as a transnational approach to document the rich and diverse experiences of Asians in the United States