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Make It Rain

Author: Kristine Harper
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022643723X
Size: 18.96 MB
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Weather control. Juxtaposing those two words is enough to raise eyebrows in a world where even the best weather models still fail to nail every forecast, and when the effects of climate change on sea level height, seasonal averages of weather phenomena, and biological behavior are being watched with interest by all, regardless of political or scientific persuasion. But between the late nineteenth century—when the United States first funded an attempt to “shock” rain out of clouds—and the late 1940s, rainmaking (as it had been known) became weather control. And then things got out of control. In Make It Rain, Kristine C. Harper tells the long and somewhat ludicrous history of state-funded attempts to manage, manipulate, and deploy the weather in America. Harper shows that governments from the federal to the local became helplessly captivated by the idea that weather control could promote agriculture, health, industrial output, and economic growth at home, or even be used as a military weapon and diplomatic tool abroad. Clear fog for landing aircraft? There’s a project for that. Gentle rain for strawberries? Let’s do it! Enhanced snowpacks for hydroelectric utilities? Check. The heyday of these weather control programs came during the Cold War, as the atmosphere came to be seen as something to be defended, weaponized, and manipulated. Yet Harper demonstrates that today there are clear implications for our attempts to solve the problems of climate change.

Slopovers

Author: Stephen J. Pyne
Publisher: University of Arizona Press
ISBN: 0816538794
Size: 50.64 MB
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America is not simply a federation of states but a confederation of regions. Some have always held national attention, some just for a time. Slopovers examines three regions that once dominated the national narrative and may now be returning to prominence. The Mid-American oak woodlands were the scene of vigorous settlement in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries and thus the scene of changing fire practices. The debate over the origin of the prairies—by climate or fire—foreshadowed the more recent debate about fire in oak and hickory hardwoods. In both cases, today’s thinking points to the critical role of fire. The Pacific Northwest was the great pivot between laissez-faire logging and state-sponsored conservation and the fires that would accompany each. Then fire faded as an environmental issue. But it has returned over the past decade like an avenging angel, forcing the region to again consider the defining dialectic between axe and flame. And Alaska—Alaska is different, as everyone says. It came late to wildland fire protection, then managed an extraordinary transfiguration into the most successful American region to restore something like the historic fire regime. But Alaska is also a petrostate, and climate change may be making it the vanguard of what the Anthropocene will mean for American fire overall. Slopovers collates surveys of these three regions into the national narrative. With a unique mixture of journalism, history, and literary imagination, renowned fire expert Stephen J. Pyne shows how culture and nature, fire from nature and fire from people, interact to shape our world with three case studies in public policy and the challenging questions they pose about the future we will share with fire.

Howell S Storm

Author: Jim Leeke
Publisher: Chicago Review Press
ISBN: 0912777974
Size: 63.25 MB
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More than half a century ago, New York City felt the increasing effects of drought, which lasted throughout 1949 and into 1950. By February, the desperate city had to try something different. Mayor William O'Dwyer hired a municipal rainmaker. Dr. Wallace E. Howell was an inspired choice. The handsome, 35-year-old Harvard-educated meteorologist was the ideal scientist—soft-spoken, modest and articulate. No fast-talking prairie huckster, he took credit for nothing he couldn't prove with sound empirical data. Howell's meticulous nature often baffled jaded New Yorkers. Over the next year, his leadership of a small ground and air armada, and his unprecedented scientific campaign to replenish the city's Catskills reservoirs, captured the imagination of the world. New York's cloud-seeding and rainmaking efforts would remain the stuff of legends—and controversy—for decades.This is the first in-depth look at New York City's only official rainmaker—an unintentional celebrity, dedicated scientist and climate entrepreneur, whose activities stirred up controversy among government officials, meteorologists, theologians, farmers and resort owners alike.

Environmental Histories Of The Cold War

Author: J. R. McNeill
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521762448
Size: 74.32 MB
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Explores the links between the Cold War and the global environment, ranging from the environmental impacts of nuclear weapons to the political repercussions of environmentalism.

It S All For Sale

Author: James Ridgeway
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 9780822333746
Size: 63.45 MB
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An analysis of who owns and controls the world's natural resources, geared for the general reader but useful for scholars of development, international relations and the environment.

21st Century Geography

Author: Joseph P. Stoltman
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 141297464X
Size: 48.52 MB
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This is a theoretical and practical guide on how to undertake and navigate advanced research in the arts, humanities and social sciences.

Sophisticated Interdependence In Climate Policy

Author: Vivian E. Thomson
Publisher: Anthem Press
ISBN: 1783081082
Size: 54.71 MB
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With the US as the world’s most prominent climate change outlaw, international pressure will not impel domestic action. The key to a successful global warming solution lies closer to home: in state–federal relations. Thomson proposes an innovative climate policy framework called “sophisticated interdependence.” This model is based on her lucid analysis of economic and political forces affecting climate change policy in selected US states, as well as on comparative descriptions of programs in Germany and Brazil, two powerful federal democracies whose policies are critical in the global climate change arena.