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Making A New Deal

Author: Lizabeth Cohen
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1316124088
Size: 26.34 MB
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This book examines how it was possible and what it meant for ordinary factory workers to become effective unionists and national political participants by the mid-1930s. We follow Chicago workers as they make choices about whether to attend ethnic benefit society meetings or to go to the movies, whether to shop in local neighborhood stores or patronize the new A & P. As they made daily decisions like these, they declared their loyalty in ways that would ultimately have political significance. When the depression worsened in the 1930s, workers adopted new ideological perspectives and overcame longstanding divisions among themselves to mount new kinds of collective action. Chicago workers' experiences all converged to make them into New Deal Democrats and CIO unionists. First printed in 1990, Making a New Deal has become an established classic in American history. The second edition includes a new preface by Lizabeth Cohen.

Making A New Deal

Author: Lizabeth Cohen
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521887489
Size: 61.18 MB
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View: 1975
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Looks at the everyday choices made by Chicago workers during the 1920s and 1930s and examines how their diverse social experiences led them to become effective union members and national political participants.

Making A New Deal

Author: Lizabeth Cohen
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107651816
Size: 69.34 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 996
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This book examines how it was possible and what it meant for ordinary factory workers to become effective unionists and national political participants by the mid-1930s. We follow Chicago workers as they make choices about whether to attend ethnic benefit society meetings or to go to the movies, whether to shop in local neighborhood stores or patronize the new A&P. As they made daily decisions like these, they declared their loyalty in ways that would ultimately have political significance. When the depression worsened in the 1930s, workers adopted new ideological perspectives and overcame longstanding divisions among themselves to mount new kinds of collective action. Chicago workers' experiences all converged to make them into New Deal Democrats and CIO unionists. First printed in 1990, Making a New Deal has become an established classic in American history. The second edition includes a new preface by Lizabeth Cohen.

A Consumers Republic

Author: Lizabeth Cohen
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307555364
Size: 24.67 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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In this signal work of history, Bancroft Prize winner and Pulitzer Prize finalist Lizabeth Cohen shows how the pursuit of prosperity after World War II fueled our pervasive consumer mentality and transformed American life. Trumpeted as a means to promote the general welfare, mass consumption quickly outgrew its economic objectives and became synonymous with patriotism, social equality, and the American Dream. Material goods came to embody the promise of America, and the power of consumers to purchase everything from vacuum cleaners to convertibles gave rise to the power of citizens to purchase political influence and effect social change. Yet despite undeniable successes and unprecedented affluence, mass consumption also fostered economic inequality and the fracturing of society along gender, class, and racial lines. In charting the complex legacy of our “Consumers’ Republic” Lizabeth Cohen has written a bold, encompassing, and profoundly influential book. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Building New Deal Liberalism

Author: Jason Scott Smith
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521828055
Size: 19.17 MB
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This book provides the first historical study of New Deal public works programs and their role in transforming the American economy, landscape, and political system during the twentieth century. Through its public works, the New Deal produced a revolution in state-sponsored economic development. The scale and scope of this dramatic federal investment in infrastructure laid crucial foundations for postwar growth, anticipating the building of national highways and the military-industrial complex. This book provides a path-breaking reinterpretation of the relationship between the New Deal's welfare state and American liberalism.

Steelworker Alley

Author: Robert Bruno
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 9780801486005
Size: 45.50 MB
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For retired steelworkers in Youngstown, Ohio, the label "working class" fits comfortably. Questioning the widely held view that laborers in postwar America have adopted middle-class values, Robert Bruno shows that in this community a blue-collar identity has provided a positive focus for many residents.The son of a Youngstown steelworker, Bruno returned to his hometown seeking to understand the formation of his own working-class consciousness and the place of labor in the larger capitalist society. Drawing on interviews with dozens of former steelworkers and on research in local archives, Bruno explores the culture of the community, including such subjects as relations among co-workers, class antagonism, and attitudes toward authority. He describes how, because workers are often neighbors, the workplace takes on a feeling of neighborhood. He also demonstrates that to understand class consciousness one must look beyond the workplace, in this instance from Youngstown's front porches to its bowling alleys and voting booths. Written with a deeply personal approach, Steelworker Alley is a richly detailed look at workers which reveals the continuing strength of class relationships in America.

Racial Fault Lines

Author: Tomas Almaguer
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520942905
Size: 49.38 MB
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This book unravels the ethnic history of California since the late nineteenth-century Anglo-American conquest and the institutionalization of "white supremacy" in the state. Drawing from an array of primary and secondary sources, Tomás Almaguer weaves a detailed, disturbing portrait of ethnic, racial, and class relationships during this tumultuous time. A new preface looks at the invaluable contribution the book has made to our understanding of ethnicity and class in America and of the social construction of "race" in the Far West.

Silk Stockings And Socialism

Author: Sharon McConnell-Sidorick
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469632969
Size: 16.97 MB
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The 1920s Jazz Age is remembered for flappers and speakeasies, not for the success of a declining labor movement. A more complex story was unfolding among the young women and men in the hosiery mills of Kensington, the working-class heart of Philadelphia. Their product was silk stockings, the iconic fashion item of the flapper culture then sweeping America and the world. Although the young people who flooded into this booming industry were avid participants in Jazz Age culture, they also embraced a surprising, rights-based labor movement, headed by the socialist-led American Federation of Full-Fashioned Hosiery Workers (AFFFHW). In this first history of this remarkable union, Sharon McConnell-Sidorick reveals how activists ingeniously fused youth culture and radical politics to build a subculture that included dances and parties as well as picket lines and sit-down strikes, while forging a vision for social change. In documenting AFFFHW members and the Kensington community, McConnell-Sidorick shows how labor federations like the Congress of Industrial Organizations and government programs like the New Deal did not spring from the heads of union leaders or policy experts but were instead nurtured by grassroots social movements across America.

The Unwieldy American State

Author: Joanna Grisinger
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107004322
Size: 77.23 MB
Format: PDF
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The Unwieldy American State examines controversies over federal administrative law in the 1940s and 1950s. The seemingly arcane procedures used by federal administrative agencies to make rules, draft policies, and issue orders were a major political issue in the years following World War II, as politicians and lawyers tried to shape rules according to their own political preferences. Reforms changed both administrative operations and the public discussion surrounding them and made the administrative state more difficult to attack.