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Making A New Deal

Author: Lizabeth Cohen
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1316124088
Size: 41.95 MB
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This book examines how it was possible and what it meant for ordinary factory workers to become effective unionists and national political participants by the mid-1930s. We follow Chicago workers as they make choices about whether to attend ethnic benefit society meetings or to go to the movies, whether to shop in local neighborhood stores or patronize the new A & P. As they made daily decisions like these, they declared their loyalty in ways that would ultimately have political significance. When the depression worsened in the 1930s, workers adopted new ideological perspectives and overcame longstanding divisions among themselves to mount new kinds of collective action. Chicago workers' experiences all converged to make them into New Deal Democrats and CIO unionists. First printed in 1990, Making a New Deal has become an established classic in American history. The second edition includes a new preface by Lizabeth Cohen.

Making A New Deal

Author: Lizabeth Cohen
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521887489
Size: 40.64 MB
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Looks at the everyday choices made by Chicago workers during the 1920s and 1930s and examines how their diverse social experiences led them to become effective union members and national political participants.

Making A New Deal

Author: Lizabeth Cohen
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107651816
Size: 23.95 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 527
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This book examines how it was possible and what it meant for ordinary factory workers to become effective unionists and national political participants by the mid-1930s. We follow Chicago workers as they make choices about whether to attend ethnic benefit society meetings or to go to the movies, whether to shop in local neighborhood stores or patronize the new A&P. As they made daily decisions like these, they declared their loyalty in ways that would ultimately have political significance. When the depression worsened in the 1930s, workers adopted new ideological perspectives and overcame longstanding divisions among themselves to mount new kinds of collective action. Chicago workers' experiences all converged to make them into New Deal Democrats and CIO unionists. First printed in 1990, Making a New Deal has become an established classic in American history. The second edition includes a new preface by Lizabeth Cohen.

A Consumers Republic

Author: Lizabeth Cohen
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307555364
Size: 47.50 MB
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In this signal work of history, Bancroft Prize winner and Pulitzer Prize finalist Lizabeth Cohen shows how the pursuit of prosperity after World War II fueled our pervasive consumer mentality and transformed American life. Trumpeted as a means to promote the general welfare, mass consumption quickly outgrew its economic objectives and became synonymous with patriotism, social equality, and the American Dream. Material goods came to embody the promise of America, and the power of consumers to purchase everything from vacuum cleaners to convertibles gave rise to the power of citizens to purchase political influence and effect social change. Yet despite undeniable successes and unprecedented affluence, mass consumption also fostered economic inequality and the fracturing of society along gender, class, and racial lines. In charting the complex legacy of our “Consumers’ Republic” Lizabeth Cohen has written a bold, encompassing, and profoundly influential book. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Dark Sweat White Gold

Author: Devra Weber
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520207106
Size: 45.17 MB
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"Belongs on the same shelf as Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath and McWilliams' Factories in the Field."—David Montejano, University of Texas

Freedom Is Not Enough

Author: Nancy MacLean
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674027497
Size: 29.14 MB
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MacLean shows how African American and Mexican American civil rights activists and feminists concluded that freedom alone would not suffice: access to jobs at all levels is a requisite of full citizenship. This text chronicles the cultural and political advances that have irrevocably changed America.

This Land This Nation

Author: Sarah T. Phillips
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139462229
Size: 41.11 MB
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This 2007 book combines political with environmental history to present conservation policy as a critical arm of New Deal reform, one that embodied the promises and limits of midcentury American liberalism. It interprets the natural resource programs of the 1930s and 1940s as a set of federal strategies aimed at rehabilitating the economies of agricultural areas. The New Dealers believed that the country as a whole would remain mired in depression as long as its farmers remained poorer than its urban residents, and these politicians and policymakers set out to rebuild rural life and raise rural incomes with measures tied directly to conservation objectives - land retirement, soil restoration, flood control, and affordable electricity for homes and industries. In building new constituencies for the environmental initiatives, resource administrators and their liberal allies established the political justification for an enlarged federal government and created the institutions that shaped the contemporary rural landscape.

Battling The Plantation Mentality

Author: Laurie Beth Green
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 9780807888872
Size: 24.76 MB
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African American freedom is often defined in terms of emancipation and civil rights legislation, but it did not arrive with the stroke of a pen or the rap of a gavel. No single event makes this more plain, Laurie Green argues, than the 1968 Memphis sanitation workers' strike, which culminated in the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. Exploring the notion of "freedom" in postwar Memphis, Green demonstrates that the civil rights movement was battling an ongoing "plantation mentality" based on race, gender, and power that permeated southern culture long before--and even after--the groundbreaking legislation of the mid-1960s. With its slogan "I AM a Man!" the Memphis strike provides a clarion example of how the movement fought for a black freedom that consisted of not only constitutional rights but also social and human rights. As the sharecropping system crumbled and migrants streamed to the cities during and after World War II, the struggle for black freedom touched all aspects of daily life. Green traces the movement to new locations, from protests against police brutality and racist movie censorship policies to innovations in mass culture, such as black-oriented radio stations. Incorporating scores of oral histories, Green demonstrates that the interplay of politics, culture, and consciousness is critical to truly understanding freedom and the black struggle for it.

Museums In A Global Context

Author: Jennifer Dickey
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 1442276800
Size: 67.77 MB
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Museums reflect a nation's character, as well as define it. Museums around the world have been shaped by globalization, and in turn have shaped a global public's understanding of local, regional, or national identity. Essayists consider the politics of museum interpretation in the global context, issues of cultural patrimony and heritage tourism, the risks of crossing boundaries and borders to present controversial subjects, and strategies for engaging audiences and communities. International case studies from Germany, Morocco, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, South Africa, Niger, and Vietnam underscore the common motives and sensibilities, as well as the challenges, of the world's museums in their efforts to educate and inspire.