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Marked

Author: Devah Pager
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226644855
Size: 46.55 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Nearly every job application asks it: have you ever been convicted of a crime? For the hundreds of thousands of young men leaving American prisons each year, their answer to that question may determine whether they can find work and begin rebuilding their lives. The product of an innovative field experiment, Marked gives us our first real glimpse into the tremendous difficulties facing ex-offenders in the job market. Devah Pager matched up pairs of young men, randomly assigned them criminal records, then sent them on hundreds of real job searches throughout the city of Milwaukee. Her applicants were attractive, articulate, and capable—yet ex-offenders received less than half the callbacks of the equally qualified applicants without criminal backgrounds. Young black men, meanwhile, paid a particularly high price: those with clean records fared no better in their job searches than white men just out of prison. Such shocking barriers to legitimate work, Pager contends, are an important reason that many ex-prisoners soon find themselves back in the realm of poverty, underground employment, and crime that led them to prison in the first place. “Using scholarly research, field research in Milwaukee, and graphics, [Pager] shows that ex-offenders, white or black, stand a very poor chance of getting a legitimate job. . . . Both informative and convincing.”—Library Journal “Marked is that rare book: a penetrating text that rings with moral concern couched in vivid prose—and one of the most useful sociological studies in years.”—Michael Eric Dyson

Marked

Author: Devah Pager
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226644844
Size: 35.72 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 2397
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Nearly every job application asks it: have you ever been convicted of a crime? For the hundreds of thousands of young men leaving American prisons each year, their answer to that question may determine whether they can find work and begin rebuilding their lives. The product of an innovative field experiment, Marked gives us our first real glimpse into the tremendous difficulties facing ex-offenders in the job market. Devah Pager matched up pairs of young men, randomly assigned them criminal records, then sent them on hundreds of real job searches throughout the city of Milwaukee. Her applicants were attractive, articulate, and capable—yet ex-offenders received less than half the callbacks of the equally qualified applicants without criminal backgrounds. Young black men, meanwhile, paid a particularly high price: those with clean records fared no better in their job searches than white men just out of prison. Such shocking barriers to legitimate work, Pager contends, are an important reason that many ex-prisoners soon find themselves back in the realm of poverty, underground employment, and crime that led them to prison in the first place. “Using scholarly research, field research in Milwaukee, and graphics, [Pager] shows that ex-offenders, white or black, stand a very poor chance of getting a legitimate job. . . . Both informative and convincing.”—Library Journal “Marked is that rare book: a penetrating text that rings with moral concern couched in vivid prose—and one of the most useful sociological studies in years.”—Michael Eric Dyson

Marked

Author: Devah Pager
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 13.84 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 6512
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Nearly every job application asks it: have you ever been convicted of a crime? For the hundreds of thousands of young men leaving American prisons each year, their answer to that question may determine whether they can find work and begin rebuilding their lives. The product of an innovative field experiment, Marked gives us our first real glimpse into the tremendous difficulties facing ex-offenders in the job market. Devah Pager matched up pairs of young men, randomly assigned them criminal records, then sent them on hundreds of real job searches throughout the city of Milwaukee. Her applicants were attractive, articulate, and capable—yet ex-offenders received less than half the callbacks of the equally qualified applicants without criminal backgrounds. Young black men, meanwhile, paid a particularly high price: those with clean records fared no better in their job searches than white men just out of prison. Such shocking barriers to legitimate work, Pager contends, are an important reason that many ex-prisoners soon find themselves back in the realm of poverty, underground employment, and crime that led them to prison in the first place. “Using scholarly research, field research in Milwaukee, and graphics, [Pager] shows that ex-offenders, white or black, stand a very poor chance of getting a legitimate job. . . . Both informative and convincing.”—Library Journal “Marked is that rare book: a penetrating text that rings with moral concern couched in vivid prose—and one of the most useful sociological studies in years.”—Michael Eric Dyson

Texas Tough

Author: Robert Perkinson
Publisher: Metropolitan Books
ISBN: 9781429952774
Size: 44.88 MB
Format: PDF
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A vivid history of America's biggest, baddest prison system and how it came to lead the nation's punitive revolution In the prison business, all roads lead to Texas. The most locked-down state in the nation has led the way in criminal justice severity, from assembly-line executions to isolation supermaxes, from prison privatization to sentencing juveniles as adults. Texas Tough, a sweeping history of American imprisonment from the days of slavery to the present, shows how a plantation-based penal system once dismissed as barbaric became the national template. Drawing on convict accounts, official records, and interviews with prisoners, guards, and lawmakers, historian Robert Perkinson reveals the Southern roots of our present-day prison colossus. While conventional histories emphasize the North's rehabilitative approach, he shows how the retributive and profit-driven regime of the South ultimately triumphed. Most provocatively, he argues that just as convict leasing and segregation emerged in response to Reconstruction, so today's mass incarceration, with its vast racial disparities, must be seen as a backlash against civil rights. Illuminating for the first time the origins of America's prison juggernaut, Texas Tough points toward a more just and humane future.

Punishment And Inequality In America

Author: Bruce Western
Publisher: Russell Sage Foundation
ISBN: 1610445554
Size: 11.64 MB
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Over the last thirty years, the prison population in the United States has increased more than seven-fold to over two million people, including vastly disproportionate numbers of minorities and people with little education. For some racial and educational groups, incarceration has become a depressingly regular experience, and prison culture and influence pervade their communities. Almost 60 percent of black male high school drop-outs in their early thirties have spent time in prison. In Punishment and Inequality in America, sociologist Bruce Western explores the recent era of mass incarceration and the serious social and economic consequences it has wrought. Punishment and Inequality in America dispels many of the myths about the relationships among crime, imprisonment, and inequality. While many people support the increase in incarceration because of recent reductions in crime, Western shows that the decrease in crime rates in the 1990s was mostly fueled by growth in city police forces and the pacification of the drug trade. Getting "tough on crime" with longer sentences only explains about 10 percent of the fall in crime, but has come at a significant cost. Punishment and Inequality in America reveals a strong relationship between incarceration and severely dampened economic prospects for former inmates. Western finds that because of their involvement in the penal system, young black men hardly benefited from the economic boom of the 1990s. Those who spent time in prison had much lower wages and employment rates than did similar men without criminal records. The losses from mass incarceration spread to the social sphere as well, leaving one out of ten young black children with a father behind bars by the end of the 1990s, thereby helping perpetuate the damaging cycle of broken families, poverty, and crime. The recent explosion of imprisonment is exacting heavy costs on American society and exacerbating inequality. Whereas college or the military were once the formative institutions in young men's lives, prison has increasingly usurped that role in many communities. Punishment and Inequality in America profiles how the growth in incarceration came about and the toll it is taking on the social and economic fabric of many American communities.

Race Crime

Author: Michael Rowe
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 1446292118
Size: 56.16 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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In this original and cutting-edge new textbook, Mike Rowe explores the key topics in race and crime. Examining the main issues from a historical and comparative approach, the book fully situates arguments and ideas in a global context with contemporary examples. Encouraging readers to think critically about well-worn debates, Race & Crime covers a diverse range of issues, including: Representation and Disproportionality Victimisation Human Rights Terrorism Popular Culture Governance As with all books in the Key Approaches to Criminology series, Race & Crime features extensive learning features to help students to fully engage with topics covered. These include: chapter overviews, study questions, further reading and key terms. Stylishly written yet accessible, Race & Crime will prove invigorating, vital reading for students in criminology, sociology, race and ethnic studies, and cultural studies. The Key Approaches to Criminology series celebrates the removal of traditional barriers between disciplines and, specifically, reflects criminology’s interdisciplinary nature and focus. It brings together some of the leading scholars working at the intersections of criminology and related subjects. Each book in the series helps readers to make intellectual connections between criminology and other discourses, and to understand the importance of studying crime and criminal justice within the context of broader debates. The series is intended to have appeal across the entire range of undergraduate and postgraduate studies and beyond, comprising books which offer introductions to the fields as well as advancing ideas and knowledge in their subject areas.

Black In Blue

Author: Kenneth Bolton
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135943753
Size: 39.26 MB
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From New York to Los Angeles, police departments across the country are consistently accused of racism. Although historically white police precincts have been slowly integrating over the past few decades, African-American officers still encounter racism on the job. Bolton and Feagin have interviewed fifty veteran African-American police officers to provide real-life and vivid examples of the difficulties and discrimination these officers face everyday inside and outside the police station from barriers in hiring and getting promoted to lack of trust from citizens and members of black community.

Building The Prison State

Author: Heather Schoenfeld
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022652101X
Size: 38.56 MB
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The United States incarcerates more people per capita than any other industrialized nation in the world—about 1 in 100 adults, or more than 2 million people—while national spending on prisons has catapulted 400 percent. Given the vast racial disparities in incarceration, the prison system also reinforces race and class divisions. How and why did we become the world’s leading jailer? And what can we, as a society, do about it? Reframing the story of mass incarceration, Heather Schoenfeld illustrates how the unfinished task of full equality for African Americans led to a series of policy choices that expanded the government’s power to punish, even as they were designed to protect individuals from arbitrary state violence. Examining civil rights protests, prison condition lawsuits, sentencing reforms, the War on Drugs, and the rise of conservative Tea Party politics, Schoenfeld explains why politicians veered from skepticism of prisons to an embrace of incarceration as the appropriate response to crime. To reduce the number of people behind bars, Schoenfeld argues that we must transform the political incentives for imprisonment and develop a new ideological basis for punishment.

Offender Reentry

Author: Associate Professor and Chair of Justice Studies University of West Florida Matthew S Crow
Publisher: Jones & Bartlett Publishers
ISBN: 1449686036
Size: 11.22 MB
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An Innovative New Text That Addresses a Critical Issue Nearly 2,000 people are released from prison every day in the United States, many of whom face significant barriers to re-entry into the civilian population. Within three years, two-thirds of them will be rearrested, and nearly half will return to prison for a new crime or parole violation. Offender Reentry: Rethinking Criminology and Criminal Justice is the first text of its kind to address this major issue in criminology and criminal justice. Bringing together cutting-edge and never-before-published research, and authored by the most critically recognized experts in the field, this text offers students extraordinary insight into the experiences of both offenders in reentry and the practitioners who work within the legal system. Real-world stories from criminal justice professionals and offenders themselves are integrated with up-to-the minute research and thought-provoking analysis. Student-oriented pedagogical features, including critical-thinking and discussion questions for every chapter, push students to engage deeply with the text and synthesize their own innovative solutions to contemporary problems. The text addresses all of the societal factors that affect offender reentry, as well as the political and economic effects on the community and issues of public safety. Ideally suited for upper-level undergraduate and graduate courses in criminal justice and criminology, Offender Reentry is an invaluable new addition to the field.

Race And Crime

Author: Shaun L. Gabbidon
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 1452202605
Size: 59.64 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Written by two award winning criminologists, the third edition of Race and Crime continues to examine the history of how racial and ethnic groups intersect with the U.S. criminal justice system, and investigates key contemporary issues relevant to understanding the current state of race/ethnicity and crime in the United States. This thought-provoking text provides students the latest research and data on White, Black, Hispanic, Asian-American and Native American intersections with the criminal justice system. The unique historical perspective is integrated throughout the text and provides students with a panoramic perspective on race and crime.