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Mcculloch V Maryland

Author: Mark Robert Killenbeck
Publisher: Univ Pr of Kansas
ISBN:
Size: 47.92 MB
Format: PDF
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Federalism--including its meanings and limits--remains one of the most contested principles in constitutional law. To fully understand its importance, we must turn to a landmark decision nearly two centuries old. M'Culloch v. Maryland (1819) is widely regarded as the Supreme Court's most important and influential decision--one that essentially defined the nature and scope of federal authority and its relationship to the states. Mark Killenbeck's sharply insightful study helps us understand why. Killenbeck recounts how the cashier of the Baltimore branch of the Second Bank of the United States refused to pay Maryland's tax on the bank and how that act precipitated a showdown in the Supreme Court, which addressed two questions: whether the U.S. Congress had the authority to establish a national bank and whether Maryland's tax on the bank was barred by the Constitution. In one of Chief Justice John Marshall's most famous opinions, the Court unanimously answered yes to both, authorizing the federal government to exercise powers not expressly articulated in the Constitution--and setting an alarming precedent for states-rights advocates. The issues at the heart of M'Culloch are as important today as they were then: the nature and scope of federal constitutional authority, the division of authority between federal and state governments, and the role of the Supreme Court in interpreting and applying the Constitution. Situating the case within the protracted debate about the bank and about federal-state relations, the Panic of 1819, the fate of the Second Bank following the Court's momentous decision, and the ever-expanding and increasingly contentious debate over slavery, Killenbeck's bookprovides a virtual constitutional history of the first fifty years of the nations. As such, it shows that the development of the Constitution as a viable governing document took place over time and that M'Culloch, with its very broad reading of federal power, marked a turning point for the Constitution, the Court, and the nation. As the Court continues to reshape the boundaries of federal power. M'Culloch looms large as a precedent in a debate that has never been fully settled. And as states today grapple with such questions as abortion, gay rights, medical marijuana, or assisted suicide, this book puts that precedent in perspective and offers a firm grasp of its implications for the future.

Keeping The Republic Power And Citizenship In American Politics 6th Edition The Essentials

Author: Christine Barbour
Publisher: CQ Press
ISBN: 1452240035
Size: 51.38 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Effectively using the themes of power and citizenship, Christine Barbour and Gerald C. Wright explain how and why institutions and rules determine who wins and who loses in American politics. Whether you get your news from a popular blog or a traditional media outlet, this book models critical thinking and provides the tools you need to be a savvy consumer of political information. And with your purchase of this Media Edition, you get FREE access to an enhanced eBook, which includes links to audio, video, data, articles, historical background, profiles, and CQ Researcher policy reports that bring depth and interactivity to the book Keeping the Republic is filled with phenomenal resources that help students fully engage in the text. It is well written and extremely substantive. Students rave about the graphics, pictures, and other visuals that help guide them as they understand the material. The transitions from topic to topic are smooth and clear, and the real-world applications are also extremely well done. A terrific textbook for intro students, and a great foundation for budding political scientists."---Alison Dagnes, Shippensburg university "Keeping the Republic presents the information in a balanced and visually appealing style that gets, and keeps, students reading and engaged with the content. The graphics and `Don't Be Fooled By...' features are well above the competition. The online instructor resources are excellent." ---Gary A. Johnson, Weber State University "The political science faculty at our Virginia state university have utilized Keeping the Republic for many years. Barbour and Wright offer current and helpful pedagogical features that encourage class discussion and reinforce the students' understanding of critical information. The text's organization offers a useful means of breaking down the semester-length course, and my students genuinely like the layout of the text."---Peter M. Carlson, Christopher Newport University "Keeping the Republic simplifies complicated concepts without losing the key points. Students find the book easy to read and well organized for study. The book is especially well suited for the non-political science major and works well for large-sized sections or for online courses. The `Thinking Outside the Box' questions, along with the helpful test bank, encourage discussion in class or in online forums."---Donald S. Inbody, Texas State University "Keeping the Republic holds the attention of my students better than books I have used in the past. I like to include as much pop culture as I can in the teaching of my class, and this book is the best one I have found that makes an effort to do the same."---Norman Rodriguez, John Wood Community College "What's at stake? This book repeats that question over and over. It defines a perspective that makes Keeping the Republic meaningful to all students of American government. Citizenship is a skill, and this text approaches government from the point of view of the citizen. It asks the reader to be critical, not in the sense that government is necessarily the problem, but rather in asking how government structure and operations can be improved to enhance the lives of the citizens of the United States, of which the reader is one. And, importantly, the book requires the reader to confront the question of what role and responsibility do I, the citizen, have. By default, the approach pulls the student in and makes the student a partner in the book and its conclusions."---John P. McIver, University of Texas, Austin "I continue to assign Keeping the Republic because the authors do a great job of keeping students engaged. There are many features that make this text more interesting to students---like the `Profiles in Citizenship' in each chapter that explain how individual Americans take an active part in politics. These profiles provide interesting personal narratives about why citizenship and participation matter while also reinforcing chapter material." ---Jason D. Mycoff, University of Delaware

Why Politics Matters An Introduction To Political Science

Author: Kevin Dooley
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 0618907157
Size: 41.45 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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WHY POLITICS MATTERS: AN INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL SCIENCE is a full-color, accessible introduction to Political Science. Organized evenly around the major divisions within Political Science: Theory, American Government, Comparative Politics, and International Relations, WHY POLITICS MATTERS follows a foundational approach to learning and gives students a big picture of the field. The authors approach the subject through a theme of theory and practice and emphasize why politics matters to the reader through current, global examples, encouraging critical thinking, discussion, and participation throughout the text. WHY POLITICS MATTERS is the first and only Introduction to Political Science book offering a fully integrated and customizable online reader, COURSEREADER, with a full slate of recommended primary source readings compiled by the authors. Each COURSEREADER selection is called-out in the text alongside the relevant discussion and is accompanied by critical thinking questions to help students apply the reading to their chapter lesson. You can further customize COURSEREADER for your class by choosing from the thousands of documents and videos within our Introduction to Political Science set and even adding your own notes and highlights before publishing your unique online reader for students to access. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Dissent And The Supreme Court

Author: Melvin I. Urofsky
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 030774132X
Size: 61.57 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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In his major work, acclaimed historian and judicial authority Melvin Urofsky examines the great dissents throughout the Court's long history. Constitutional dialogue is one of the ways in which we as a people reinvent and reinvigorate our democratic society. The Supreme Court has interpreted the meaning of the Constitution, acknowledged that the Court's majority opinions have not always been right, and initiated a critical discourse about what a particular decision should mean and fashioning subsequent decisions--largely through the power of dissent. Urofsky shows how the practice grew slowly but steadily, beginning with the infamous & now overturned case of Dred Scott v. Sanford (1857) during which Chief Justice Roger Taney's opinion upheld slaver and ending with the present age of incivility, in which reasoned dialogue seems less and less possible. Dissent on the court and off, Urofsky argues in this major work, has been a crucial ingredient in keeping the Constitution alive and must continue to be so.

Do Great Cases Make Bad Law

Author: Lackland H. Bloom, Jr.
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 019084289X
Size: 64.12 MB
Format: PDF
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"Great cases like hard cases make bad law" declared Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. in his dissenting opinion in the Northern Securities antitrust case of 1904. His maxim argues that those cases which ascend to the Supreme Court of the United States by virtue of their national importance, interest, or other extreme circumstance, make for poor bases upon which to construct a general law. Frequently, such cases catch the public's attention because they raise important legal issues, and they become landmark decisions from a doctrinal standpoint. Yet from a practical perspective, great cases could create laws poorly suited for far less publicly tantalizing but far more common situations. In Do Great Cases Make Bad Law?, Lackland H. Bloom, Jr. tests Justice Holmes' dictum by analyzing in detail the history of the Supreme Court's great cases, from Marbury v. Madison in 1803, to National Federation of Independent Business v. Sebelius, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act case, in 2012. He treats each case with its own chapter, and explains why the Court found a case compelling, how the background and historical context affected the decision and its place in constitutional law and history, how academic scholarship has treated the case, and how the case integrates with and reflects off of Justice Holmes' famous statement. In doing so, Professor Bloom draws on the whole of the Supreme Court's decisional history to form an intricate scholarly understanding of the holistic significance of the Court's reasoning in American constitutional law.