Download mea culpa a sociology of apology and reconciliation in pdf or read mea culpa a sociology of apology and reconciliation in pdf online books in PDF, EPUB and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to get mea culpa a sociology of apology and reconciliation in pdf book now. This site is like a library, Use search box in the widget to get ebook that you want.



Mea Culpa

Author:
Publisher: Stanford University Press
ISBN: 0804766738
Size: 54.22 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 178
Download and Read

Mea Culpa

Author: Nicholas Tavuchis
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780804719360
Size: 20.67 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 2346
Download and Read
Drawing upon the insights of several disciplines, this work focuses on the structural and experiential dynamics of interpersonal and collective apologetic discourse as means of tempering antagonisms and resolving conflicts in contemporary Western society.

Colonial Genocide And Reparations Claims In The 21st Century The Socio Legal Context Of Claims Under International Law By The Herero Against Germany For Genocide In Namibia 1904 1908

Author: Jeremy Sarkin
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 0313362572
Size: 77.75 MB
Format: PDF
View: 5307
Download and Read
More and more, the descendants of indigenous victims of genocide, land expropriation, forced labor, and other systematic human rights violations committed by colonial powers are seeking reparations under international law from the modern successor governments and corporations. As the number of colonial reparations cases increases, courts around the world are being asked to apply international law to determine whether reparations are due for atrocities and crimes that might have been committed long ago but whose lasting effects are alleged to injure the modern descendants of the victims. Sarkin analyzes the thorny issues of international law raised in such suits by focusing on groundbreaking cases in which he is involved as legal advisor to the paramount chief of the Herero people of Namibia. In 2001, the Herero became the first ethnic group to seek reparations under the legal definition of genocide by bringing multi-billion-dollar suits against Germany and German companies in a number of U.S. federal courts under the Alien Torts Claim Act of 1789. The Herero genocide, conducted in German South-West Africa (present-day Namibia) between 1904 and 1908, is recognized by the UN as the first organized state genocide in world history. Although the Herero were subjected to Germany's First Genocide, they have, unlike the victims of the Holocaust, received no reparations from Germany. By machine-gun massacres, starvation, poisoning, and forced labor in Germany's first concentration camps, the German Schutztruppe systematically exterminated as many as 105,000 Herero women, and children, composing most of the Herero population. Sarkin considers whether these historical events constitute legally defined genocide, crimes against humanity, and other international crimes. He evaluates the legal status of indigenous polities in Africa at the time and he explores the enduring impact in Namibia of the Germany's colonial campaign of genocide. He extrapolates the Herero case to global issues of reparations, apologies, and historical human rights violations, especially in Africa.

A Cultural Sociology Of Anglican Mission And The Indian Residential Schools In Canada

Author: Eric Taylor Woods
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137486716
Size: 33.87 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 2862
Download and Read
This book focuses on the recurring struggle over the meaning of the Anglican Church’s role in the Indian residential schools--a long-running school system designed to assimilate Indigenous children into Euro-Canadian culture, in which sexual, psychological, and physical abuse were common. From the end of the nineteenth century until the outset of twenty-first century, the meaning of the Indian residential schools underwent a protracted transformation. Once a symbol of the Church’s sacred mission to Christianize and civilize Indigenous children, they are now associated with colonialism and suffering. In bringing this transformation to light, the book addresses why the Church was so quick to become involved in the Indian residential schools and why acknowledgment of their deleterious impact was so protracted. In doing so, the book adds to our understanding of the sociological process by which perpetrators come to recognize themselves as such.

Forgiveness Reconciliation

Author: Raymond G. Helmick
Publisher: Templeton Foundation Press
ISBN: 189015184X
Size: 33.57 MB
Format: PDF
View: 6594
Download and Read
This book brings together a unique combination of experts in the area of conflict resolution and focuses on the role forgiveness can play in the process. It deals with the theology, public policy, psychological and social theory, and social policy implementation of forgiveness. The first section of the book explores how ideas like "forgiveness" and "reconciliation" are moving out from the seminary and academy into the world of public policy, and how these terms have been used and defined in the past. One of the contributors, Miroslav Volf, speaks to the Christian contribution of a more peaceful environment. The second section looks at forgiveness and public policy. One of the chapters, by Donald W. Shriver Jr., addresses forgiveness in a secular political forum.The third section of the book draws us to a more particular analysis of the relationship between forgiveness and reconciliation from voices in the academic and theological community. John Paul Lederach presents five qualities of practice in support of the reconciliation process. John Dawson gives hope for peace-making in a new century. The final section highlights the work of practitioners currently working with religion, public policy, and conflict transformation, particularly in areas such as Ireland and Africa. This book will be an essential for libraries, scholars, conflict negotiators, and all people who hope to understand the role of forgiveness in the peace process.Contributors include: Desmond M. Tutu, Rodney L. Petersen, Miroslav Volf, Stanley S. Harakas, Raymond G. Helmick, SJ, Joseph V. Montville, Douglas M. Johnston, Donna Hicks, Donald W. Shriver, Jr., Everett L. Worthington, Jr., John Paul Lederach, Ervin Staub, Laurie Anne Pearlman, John Dawson, Audrey R. Chapman, Olga Botcharova, Anthony da Silva, SJ, Geraldine Smythe, OP, Andrea Bartoli, Ofelia Ortega, and George F. R. Ellis.

Interracial Justice

Author: Eric K. Yamamoto
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814729452
Size: 71.47 MB
Format: PDF
View: 5066
Download and Read
The United States in the twenty-first century will be a nation of so-called minorities. Shifts in the composition of the American populace necessitate a radical change in the ways we as a nation think about race relations, identity, and racial justice. Once dominated by black-white relations, discussions of race are increasingly informed by an awareness of strife among nonwhite racial groups. While white influence remains important in nonwhite racial conflict, the time has come for acknowledgment of ways communities of color sometimes clash, and their struggles to heal the resulting wounds and forge strong alliances. Melding race history, legal theory, theology, social psychology, and anecdotes, Eric K. Yamamoto offers a fresh look at race and responsibility. He tells tales of explosive conflicts and halting conciliatory efforts between African Americans and Korean and Vietnamese immigrant shop owners in Los Angeles and New Orleans. He also paints a fascinating picture of South Africa's controversial Truth and Reconciliation Commission as well as a pathbreaking Asian American apology to Native Hawaiians for complicity in their oppression. An incisive and original work by a highly respected scholar, Interracial Justice greatly advances our understanding of conflict and healing through justice in multiracial America.

Remembering Generations

Author: Ashraf H. A. Rushdy
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 0807875589
Size: 28.82 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 2119
Download and Read
Slavery is America's family secret, a partially hidden phantom that continues to haunt our national imagination. Remembering Generations explores how three contemporary African American writers artistically represent this notion in novels about the enduring effects of slavery on the descendants of slaves in the post-civil rights era. Focusing on Gayl Jones's Corregidora (1975), David Bradley's The Chaneysville Incident (1981), and Octavia Butler's Kindred (1979), Ashraf Rushdy situates these works in their cultural moment of production, highlighting the ways in which they respond to contemporary debates about race and family. Tracing the evolution of this literary form, he considers such works as Edward Ball's Slaves in the Family (1998), in which descendants of slaveholders expose the family secrets of their ancestors. Remembering Generations examines how cultural works contribute to social debates, how a particular representational form emerges out of a specific historical epoch, and how some contemporary intellectuals meditate on the issue of historical responsibility--of recognizing that the slave past continues to exert an influence on contemporary American society.

Making Friends Across The Boundaries Of Religious Differences

Author: Deusdedit Nkurunziza
Publisher: Xlibris Corporation
ISBN: 1499092342
Size: 16.52 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 431
Download and Read
Making Friends Across the Boundaries of Religious Differences: Religions Building Peace for a New World Order discuses the meaning, reality, and dynamism of religion; explores different faiths, religious traditions currently influencing humanity today; and argues that interreligious dialogue is the way to go for the people of different religions to work together to enhance a culture of justice, human rights, democratic governance, nonviolence, and peace in the world today. While religion has been used to cause conflict, violence, and war, the book explains how in this time of globalization, faith and religion can be enhanced as resources for a new world order of justice and peace. The book further highlights interreligious dialogue as a methodology and way of life which brings about unity in diversity, advocacy for a world without terrorism, theological perspectives, women in interreligious dialogue, and how in Africa interreligious action is the soul of social-economic transformation, African Renaissance and Cosmopolitanism.

Transitional Justice

Author: Ruti G. Teitel
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 019988224X
Size: 14.58 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 3295
Download and Read
At the century's end, societies all over the world are throwing off the yoke of authoritarian rule and beginning to build democracies. At any such time of radical change, the question arises: should a society punish its ancien regime or let bygones be bygones? Transitional Justice takes this question to a new level with an interdisciplinary approach that challenges the very terms of the contemporary debate. Ruti Teitel explores the recurring dilemma of how regimes should respond to evil rule, arguing against the prevailing view favoring punishment, yet contending that the law nevertheless plays a profound role in periods of radical change. Pursuing a comparative and historical approach, she presents a compelling analysis of constitutional, legislative, and administrative responses to injustice following political upheaval. She proposes a new normative conception of justice--one that is highly politicized--offering glimmerings of the rule of law that, in her view, have become symbols of liberal transition. Its challenge to the prevailing assumptions about transitional periods makes this timely and provocative book essential reading for policymakers and scholars of revolution and new democracies.

Talking With The President

Author: John Wilson
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190266856
Size: 71.65 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 1586
Download and Read
This book provides a pragmatic analysis of presidential language. Pragmatics is concerned with "meaning in context," or the relationship between what we say and what we mean. John Wilson explores the various ways in which U.S. Presidents have used language within specific social contexts to achieve specific objectives. This includes obfuscation, misdirection, the use of metaphor or ambiguity, or in some cases simply lying. He focuses on six presidents: John F. Kennedy, Richard M. Nixon, Ronald W. Reagan, William F. Clinton, George W. Bush, and Barack H. Obama. These presidents cover most of the last half of the twentieth century, and the first decade of the twenty first century, and each has been associated with a specific linguistic quality. John F. Kennedy was famed for his quality of oratory, Nixon for his manipulative use of language, Reagan for his gift of telling stories, Clinton for his ability to engage the public and to linguistically turn arguments and descriptions in particular directions. Bush, on the other hand, was famed for his inability to use language appropriately, and Obama returns us to the rhetorical flourishes of early Kennedy. In the case of each president, a range of specific examples are explored in order to highlight the ways in which a pragmatic analysis may provide an insight into presidential language. In many cases, what the president says is not necessarily what the president means.