Download meanings of manhood in early modern england oxford studies in social history in pdf or read meanings of manhood in early modern england oxford studies in social history in pdf online books in PDF, EPUB and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to get meanings of manhood in early modern england oxford studies in social history in pdf book now. This site is like a library, Use search box in the widget to get ebook that you want.



Meanings Of Manhood In Early Modern England

Author: Alexandra Shepard
Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
ISBN: 9780199299348
Size: 37.33 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 2536
Download and Read
This path-breaking study explores the diverse and varied meanings of manhood in early modern England and their complex, and often contested, relationship with patriarchal principles. Using social, political and medical commentary, alongside evidence of social practice derived from court records, Dr Shepard argues that patriarchal ideology contained numerous contradictions, and that, while males were its primary beneficiaries, it was undermined and opposed by men as well as women. Patriarchal concepts of manhood existed in tension both with anti-patriarchal forms of resistance and with alternative codes of manhood which were sometimes primarily defined independently of patriarchal imperatives. As a result the differences within each sex, as well as between them, were intrinsic to the practice of patriarchy and the social distribution of its dividends in early modern England.

Meanings Of Manhood In Early Modern England

Author: Alexandra Shepard
Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
ISBN: 9780198208181
Size: 33.37 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 4322
Download and Read
This path-breaking study explores the diverse and varied meanings of manhood in early modern England and their complex, and often contested, relationship with patriarchal principles. Using social, political and medical commentary, alongside evidence of social practice derived from court records, Dr Shepard argues that patriarchal ideology contained numerous contradictions, and that, while males were its primary beneficiaries, it was undermined and opposed by men as well as women. Patriarchal concepts of manhood existed in tension both with anti-patriarchal forms of resistance and with alternative codes of manhood which were sometimes primarily defined independently of patriarchal imperatives. As a result the differences within each sex, as well as between them, were intrinsic to the practice of patriarchy and the social distribution of its dividends in early modern England.

Meanings Of Manhood In Early Modern England

Author: Alexandra Shepard
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780191716614
Size: 33.14 MB
Format: PDF
View: 2660
Download and Read
This study explores the diverse and varied meanings of manhood in early modern England and their complex, and often contested, relationship with patriarchal principles.

Accounting For Oneself

Author: Alexandra Shepard
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0192552422
Size: 80.27 MB
Format: PDF
View: 5626
Download and Read
Accounting for Oneself is a major new study of the social order in early modern England, as viewed and articulated from the bottom up. Engaging with how people from across the social spectrum placed themselves within the social order, it pieces together the language of self-description deployed by over 13,500 witnesses in English courts when answering questions designed to assess their creditworthiness. Spanning the period between 1550 and 1728, and with a broad geographical coverage, this study explores how men and women accounted for their 'worth' and described what they did for a living at differing points in the life-cycle. A corrective to top-down, male-centric accounts of the social order penned by elite observers, the perspective from below testifies to an intricate hierarchy based on sophisticated forms of social reckoning that were articulated throughout the social scale. A culture of appraisal was central to the competitive processes whereby people judged their own and others' social positions. For the majority it was not land that was the yardstick of status but moveable property-the goods and chattels in people's possession ranging from livestock to linens, tools to trading goods, tables to tubs, clothes to cushions. Such items were repositories of wealth and the security for the credit on which the bulk of early modern exchange depended. Accounting for Oneself also sheds new light on women's relationship to property, on gendered divisions of labour, and on early modern understandings of work which were linked as much to having as to getting a living. The view from below was not unchanging, but bears witness to the profound impact of widening social inequality that opened up a chasm between the middle ranks and the labouring poor between the mid-sixteenth and mid-seventeenth centuries. As a result, not only was the social hierarchy distorted beyond recognition, from the later-seventeenth century there was also a gradual yet fundamental reworking of the criteria informing the calculus of esteem.

Better A Shrew Than A Sheep

Author: Pamela Allen Brown
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 9780801488368
Size: 21.57 MB
Format: PDF
View: 7104
Download and Read
In a study that explodes the assumption that early modern comic culture was created by men for men, Pamela Allen Brown shows that jest books, plays, and ballads represented women as laugh-getters and sought out the laughter of ordinary women. Disputing the claim that non-elite women had little access to popular culture because of their low literacy and social marginality, Brown demonstrates that women often bested all comers in the arenas of jesting, gaining a few heady moments of agency. Juxtaposing the literature of jest against court records, sermons, and conduct books, Brown employs a witty, entertaining style to propose that non-elite women used jests to test the limits of their subjection. She also shows how women's mocking laughter could function as a means of social control in closely watched neighborhoods. While official culture beatified the sheep-like wife and disciplined the scold, jesting culture often applauded the satiric shrew, whether her target was priest, cuckold, or rapist. Brown argues that listening for women's laughter can shed light on both the dramas of the street and those of the stage: plays from The Massacre of the Innocents to The Merry Wives of Windsor to The Woman's Prize taught audiences the importance of gossips' alliances as protection against slanderers, lechers, tyrants, and wife-beaters. Other jests, ballads, jigs, and plays show women reveling in tales of female roguery or scoffing at the perverse patience of Griselda. As Brown points out, some women found Griselda types annoying and even foolish: better be a shrew than a sheep.

Hospitality In Early Modern England

Author: Felicity Heal
Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
ISBN:
Size: 23.70 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 100
Download and Read
This is the first full-length study of the ideal and practice of hospitality in England between the fifteenth and seventeenth centuries. In early modern England, hospitality was regarded as a vital social virtue, comparable in significance to the maintenance of honesty or the proper pursuit of honor. Heal's careful study examines the ways in which this notion changed between 1400 and 1700, and demonstrates the significance of the forms and rituals attached to it. Her comprehensive analysis takes into account different social levels and various settings, providing a major contribution to our understanding of society and culture in early modern England.

Medical Conflicts In Early Modern London

Author: Margaret Pelling
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199257805
Size: 77.35 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 3192
Download and Read
This is the first comprehensive analysis of the best single record we have which details the many medical practitioners in early modern London. It reveals the attitudes and realities in the conflict between the College of Physicians and the practitioners, whom the College regarded as illicit or irregular. In so doing, the book challenges the assumptions we make about the dominant professional values of modern western society.

The Crimes Of Women In Early Modern Germany

Author: Ulinka Rublack
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780198206378
Size: 22.26 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 5512
Download and Read
This fascinating study is the first to investigate the crimes of women living in Germany during the time of the Reformation and the Thirty Years War. Ulinka Rublack draws on court records to examine the lives of shrewd cutpurses, quarreling artisan wives, and soldiers' concubines, and explores women's experiences of communities and courtship, marriage, the family, and the law.

Oral And Literate Culture In England 1500 1700

Author: Adam Fox
Publisher: Clarendon Press
ISBN: 0191542296
Size: 54.51 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 2553
Download and Read
This book explores the varied vernacular forms and rich oral traditions which were such a part of popular culture in early modern England. It focuses, in particular, upon dialect speech and proverbial wisdom, "old wives' tales" and children's lore, historical legends and local customs, scurrilous versifying and scandalous rumour-mongering. Adam Fox argues that while the spoken word provides the most vivid insight into the mental world of the majority in this semi-literate society, it was by no means untouched by written influences. Even at the beginning of the period, centuries of reciprocal infusion between complementary media had created a cultural repertoire which had long ceased to be purely oral. Thereafter, the expansion of literacy together with the proliferation of texts both in manuscript and print saw the rapid acceleration and elaboration of this process. By 1700 popular traditions and modes of expression were the product of a fundamentally literate environment to a much greater extent than has yet been appreciated.