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Model Immigrants And Undesirable Aliens

Author: Christina Gerken
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780816686292
Size: 31.37 MB
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"During 1995 and 1996, President Bill Clinton signed into law three bills that altered the rights and responsibilities of immigrants: the Antiterrorism and Effective Death Penalty Act, the Personal Responsibility Act, and the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act. Model Immigrants and Undesirable Aliens examines the changing debates around immigration that preceded and followed the passage of landmark legislation by the U.S. Congress in the mid-1990s, arguing that it represented a new, neoliberal way of thinking and talking about immigration. Christina Gerken explores the content and the social implications of the deliberations that surrounded the development and passage of immigration reform, analyzing a wide array of writings from congressional debates and committee reports to articles and human-interest stories in mainstream newspapers. The process, she shows, disguised its underlying racism by creating discursive strategies that shaped and upheld an image of "desirable" immigrants--those who could demonstrate "personal responsibility" and an ability to contribute to the U.S. economy. Gerken finds that politicians linked immigration to complex issues: poverty, welfare reform, so-called family values, measures designed to combat terrorism, and the spiraling costs of social welfare programs. Although immigrants were often at the center of congressional debates, politicians constructed an elaborate, abstract terminology that appeared to be unrelated to race or gender. Instead, politicians promoted neoliberal policies as the avenue to a postracist, postsexist world of opportunity for every rational consumer with an entrepreneurial spirit. Still, Gerken concludes that the passage of pathbreaking legislation was characterized by a useful tension between neoliberal assumptions and hidden anxieties about race, class, gender, and sexuality."--

The Cultural Politics Of U S Immigration

Author: Leah Perry
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 1479828777
Size: 43.16 MB
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In the 1980s, amid increasing immigration from Latin America, the Caribbean, and Asia, the circle of who was considered American seemed to broaden, reflecting the democratic gains made by racial minorities and women. Although this expanded circle was increasingly visible in the daily lives of Americans through TV shows, films, and popular news media, these gains were circumscribed by the discourse that certain immigrants, for instance single and working mothers, were feared, censured, or welcomed exclusively as laborers. In The Cultural Politics of U.S. Immigration, Leah Perry argues that 1980s immigration discourse in law and popular media was a crucial ingredient in the cohesion of the neoliberal idea of democracy. Blending critical legal analysis with a feminist media studies methodology over a range of sources, including legal documents, congressional debates, and popular media, such as Golden Girls, Who’s the Boss?, Scarface, and Mi Vida Loca, Perry shows how even while “multicultural” immigrants were embraced, they were at the same time disciplined through gendered discourses of respectability. Examining the relationship between law and culture, this book weaves questions of legal status and gender into existing discussions about race and ethnicity to revise our understanding of both neoliberalism and immigration.

American Shame

Author: Myra Mendible
Publisher: Indiana University Press
ISBN: 0253019869
Size: 35.18 MB
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On any given day in America’s news cycle, stories and images of disgraced politicians and celebrities solicit our moral indignation, their misdeeds fueling a lucrative economy of shame and scandal. Shame is one of the most coercive, painful, and intriguing of human emotions. Only in recent years has interest in shame extended beyond a focus on the subjective experience of this emotion and its psychological effects. The essays collected here consider the role of shame as cultural practice and examine ways that public shaming practices enforce conformity and group coherence. Addressing abortion, mental illness, suicide, immigration, and body image among other issues, this volume calls attention to the ways shaming practices create and police social boundaries; how shaming speech is endorsed, judged, or challenged by various groups; and the distinct ways that shame is encoded and embodied in a nation that prides itself on individualism, diversity, and exceptionalism. Examining shame through a prism of race, sexuality, ethnicity, and gender, these provocative essays offer a broader understanding of how America’s discourse of shame helps to define its people as citizens, spectators, consumers, and moral actors.

Just Immigration

Author: Amstutz, Mark R.
Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing
ISBN: 0802874843
Size: 75.91 MB
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Few issues are as complex and controversial as immigration in the United States. The only thing anyone seems to agree on is that the system is broken. Mark Amstutz offers a succinct overview and assessment of current immigration policy and argues for an approach to the complex immigration debate that is solidly grounded in Christian political thought. After analyzing key laws and institutions in the US immigration system, Amstutz examines how Catholics, evangelicals, and main-line Protestants have used Scripture to address social and political issues, including immigration. He critiques the ways in which many Christians have approached immigration reform and offers concrete suggestions on how Christian groups can offer a more credible political engagement with this urgent policy issue.

Global Migration

Author: Elizabeth Mavroudi
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317225880
Size: 19.42 MB
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Global Migration provides a clear, concise, and well-organized discussion of historical patterns and contemporary trends of migration, while guiding the readers through an often difficult and politicised topic. Aimed primarily at undergraduate and Master’s students, the text encourages the readers to reflect on economic processes, politics, immigrant lives and raises debates about inclusion, exclusion, and citizenship. The text critically highlights the global character of contemporary migration and the importance of historical context to current processes and emphasises the role of gender, race and national ideologies in shaping migration experiences. Using over a decade of their own insight into teaching undergraduate migration courses in the US and the UK, and the knowledge and understanding of the subject they have acquired as migration researchers, the authors offer an accessible and student-friendly manner for readers to understand and explore the complex issue of migration. The book features numerous international case studies, a chapter dedicated to the perspective of the immigrants themselves, as well as key terms and further readings at the end of each chapter. Both theoretically and empirically informed Global Migration examines the subject in a holistic and expansive way. It will equip students with an understanding of the complex issues of migration and serve as a guide for instructors in structuring their courses and in identifying important bodies of scholarly research on migration issues.

Author: Homère
Publisher:
ISBN: 9789602565735
Size: 55.93 MB
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