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Muller V Oregon

Author: Nancy Woloch
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 9780312085865
Size: 24.90 MB
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The first brief book on the landmark 1908 Supreme Court decision that limited a woman's workday to ten hours, this text offers a concise analysis of the origins and impact of Muller v. Oregon. Woloch's comprehensive narrative familiarizes readers with Progressive reform, the case itself, and the conflict Muller generated within the women's movement over the issue of classification by gender. A rich collection of primary documents - including court decisions, the Brandeis brief, and essays by leading Progressive-era reformers - enables readers to analyze the decision and the ensuing debate. Editorial features include headnotes, a chronology, a bibliography, and illustrations.

Brown Vs Board Of Education Of Topeka

Author: Waldo E. Martin
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 9780312128111
Size: 50.97 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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A general introduction analyzes the case's legal precedents and situates the case in the historical context of Jim Crow discrimination and the burgeoning development of the NAACP. Photographs, a collection of political cartoons, a chronology, questions for consideration, a bibliography, and an index are also included.

A Judgment For Solomon

Author: Michael Grossberg
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521557450
Size: 31.79 MB
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The story of the d'Hauteville case, a controversial child custody battle fought in 1840. It uses the story of one couple's bitter fight over their son to explore timebound and timeless features of American legal culture.

No Constitutional Right To Be Ladies

Author: Linda K. Kerber
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 0809073846
Size: 29.81 MB
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By turning upside down the traditional paradigm of women's history as one of rights, Kerber shows us that there is no "right" to be excused from the obligations of citizenship. Hers is an invaluable new way of understanding the history of women in America - and American history more generally.

Privilege And Creative Destruction

Author: Stanley I. Kutler
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 9780801839832
Size: 28.67 MB
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In this now-classic work in legal and constitutional theory, Stanley I. Kutler examines one of the Supreme Court's most celebrated decisions. In 1837, the Court ruled that the state of Massachusetts had the right to erect a free bridge over the Charles River even though it had previously chartered a privately owned toll bridge at the same location. The Court's decision fostered the idea of "creative destruction," a process that encourages new forms of property at the expense of older ones. Exploring the origins, context, and impact of this decision, Kutler integrates traditional American constitutional history with the "new legal history" that emphasizes the social and economic bases of legal change. Book jacket.

Settlers Liberty And Empire

Author: Craig Yirush
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139496042
Size: 67.94 MB
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Traces the emergence of a revolutionary conception of political authority on the far shores of the eighteenth-century Atlantic world. Based on the equal natural right of English subjects to leave the realm, claim indigenous territory and establish new governments by consent, this radical set of ideas culminated in revolution and republicanism. But unlike most scholarship on early American political theory, Craig Yirush does not focus solely on the revolutionary era of the late eighteenth century. Instead, he examines how the political ideas of settler elites in British North America emerged in the often-forgotten years between the Glorious Revolution in America and the American Revolution against Britain. By taking seriously an imperial world characterized by constitutional uncertainty, geo-political rivalry and the ongoing presence of powerful Native American peoples, Yirush provides a long-term explanation for the distinctive ideas of the American Revolution.

Equality On Trial

Author: Katherine Turk
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 0812248201
Size: 22.36 MB
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In 1964, Title VII of the Civil Rights Act outlawed workplace sex discrimination, but its practical meaning was uncertain. Equality on Trial examines how a generation of workers and feminists fought to infuse the law with broad notions of sex equality, reshaping workplaces, activist channels, state agencies, and courts along the way.

Women Before The Bar

Author: Cornelia Hughes Dayton
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 0807838241
Size: 77.50 MB
Format: PDF
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Women before the Bar is the first study to investigate changing patterns of women's participation in early American courts across a broad range of legal actions--including proceedings related to debt, divorce, illicit sex, rape, and slander. Weaving the stories of individual women together with systematic analysis of gendered litigation patterns, Cornelia Dayton argues that women's relation to the courtroom scene in early New England shifted from one of integration in the mid-seventeenth century to one of marginality by the eve of the Revolution. Using the court records of New Haven, which originally had the most Puritan-dominated legal regime of all the colonies, Dayton argues that Puritanism's insistence on godly behavior and communal modes of disputing initially created unusual opportunities for women's voices to be heard within the legal system. But women's presence in the courts declined significantly over time as Puritan beliefs lost their status as the organizing principles of society, as legal practice began to adhere more closely to English patriarchal models, as the economy became commercialized, and as middle-class families developed an ethic of privacy. By demonstrating that the early eighteenth century was a crucial locus of change in law, economy, and gender ideology, Dayton's findings argue for a reconceptualization of women's status in colonial New England and for a new periodization of women's history.

Belonging To The World

Author: Sandra F. VanBurkleo
Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
ISBN: 9780195069723
Size: 80.27 MB
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Belonging to the World: Women's Rights and American Constitutional Culture surveys the treatment of women in American law from the nation's earliest beginnings in British North America to the present. Placing the legal history of women in the broader social, political, and economic context of American history, this book examines the evolution of women's constitutional status in the United States, the development of rights consciousness among women, and their attempts to expand zones of freedom for all women. This is the first general account of women and American constitutional history to include the voices of women alongside the more familiar voices of lawmakers. An original work of historical synthesis, it delineates the shifting relationships between American law practice and women, both within the family and elsewhere, as it looks beyond the campaign for woman suffrage to broader areas of contest and controversy. Women's stories are used throughout the book to illustrate the extraordinary range and persistence of female rebellion from the 1630s up through the present era of "post-feminist" retrenchment and backlash. Belonging to the World: Women's Rights and American Constitutional Culture dispels the myth that the story of women and the law is synonymous only with woman suffrage or married women's property acts, showing instead that American women have struggled along many fronts, not only to regain and expand their rights as sovereign citizens, but also to remake American culture.

Supreme Decisions Combined Volume

Author: Melvin I. Urofsky
Publisher: Westview Press
ISBN: 081334736X
Size: 24.73 MB
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Supreme Decisions: Great Constitutional Cases and Their Impact, Volumes 1 and 2, covers twenty-four Supreme Court cases (twelve per volume) that have shaped American constitutional law. Interpretive chapters shed light on the nuances of each case, the individuals involved, and the social, political, and cultural context at that particular moment in history. Discussing cases from nearly every decade in a two-hundred-year span, Melvin I. Urofsky expounds on the political climate of the United States from the country's infancy through the new millennium. Featuring Marbury v. Madison, Dred Scott v. Sandford, Miranda v. Arizona, Brown v. Board of Education, and many more, this text covers foundational rulings and more recent decisions. Written with students in mind, Melvin I. Urofsky's voice offers compelling and fascinating accounts of American legal milestones. Supreme Decisions can be purchased as a single combined volume or conveniently split into two volumes, providing a breadth of information for survey courses in U.S. Constitutional History.