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Narrative Life

Author: Neil Hooley
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9781402097355
Size: 22.28 MB
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Indigenous education is one of the great challenges facing humanity in the historic quest for a democratic and peaceful future. The 370 million Indigenous peoples of the world demand that the racist and colonial wrongs of the past be recti ed and that they stand as equals in confronting the social, political and cultural problems that surround us all. Education offers a way forward, whether concerned with the public good, schooling for all citizens including universal primary education and expanding secondary education, the education of women regardless of background, the inclusion of local cultures, literacy and numeracy for all as a democratic right and the provisionof comprehensiveeducationthat enables both personal aspiration, cultural satisfaction and economic pathways. What this means is that all children no matter where they live, no matter what theirbackgroundorthecolouroftheirskinshouldexpecttohaveaccesstoeducation of the highest quality. This does not impose a particular style of education for local communitiesbut respects that educationaldirections must be decidedindependently by countries themselves. Within this general context, there is also something most profound about Indigenous knowing, of appreciating Indigenous perspectives and applying these across all knowledge, across all subjects of a curriculum. Rather than accepting the one often highly conservative and dominant view of knowledge, teaching and learning for all schools, Indigenous perspectives offer other insights and means of analysis, re ection and critique. These can open up elds of creative and critical learning for all children, including the dispossessed, marginalised and disenfranchised.

Educational Effectiveness And Ineffectiveness

Author: Jaap Scheerens
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 9401774595
Size: 62.77 MB
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This book is a critical assessment of the knowledge base on educational effectiveness, covering a period of five decades of research. It formulates a “lean” theory of good schooling, and identifies and explains instances of “ineffectiveness”, such as low effect sizes of malleable conditions, for which expectations are highly strung. The book presents a systemic outlook on educational effectiveness and improvement, as it starts out from an integrated multi-level model that comprises system level, school level and instructional conditions. It offers a classification of school improvement strategies and scenarios for system level educational improvement. Above all, the analysis is very systematic, comprehensive and strongly grounded in theory. The book includes a case study analysis of various strands of improvement-oriented educational policy in the Netherlands as an illustration of some of the arguments used.

Narrative Research In Practice

Author: Rachael Dwyer
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 9811015791
Size: 39.96 MB
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This book directly addresses the multiplicity and complexity of narrative research by illustrating a variety of avenues to pursuing and publishing research that falls under the umbrella of narrative work. The chapters are drawn from a wide range of disciplines including education, literary studies, cultural studies, music and clinical studies. Each chapter considers a particular methodological issue or approach, illustrating how it was addressed in the course of the research. Each of the chapters concludes with a set of discussion exercises and a further reading list. The book offers a valuable resource for established researchers seeking to expand their methodological and theoretical repertoire, and for graduate students and researchers new to narrative methods.

Handbook Of Research On Student Engagement

Author: Sandra L. Christenson
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 1461420180
Size: 10.81 MB
Format: PDF
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For more than two decades, the concept of student engagement has grown from simple attention in class to a construct comprised of cognitive, emotional, and behavioral components that embody and further develop motivation for learning. Similarly, the goals of student engagement have evolved from dropout prevention to improved outcomes for lifelong learning. This robust expansion has led to numerous lines of research across disciplines and are brought together clearly and comprehensively in the Handbook of Research on Student Engagement. The Handbook guides readers through the field’s rich history, sorts out its component constructs, and identifies knowledge gaps to be filled by future research. Grounding data in real-world learning situations, contributors analyze indicators and facilitators of student engagement, link engagement to motivation, and gauge the impact of family, peers, and teachers on engagement in elementary and secondary grades. Findings on the effectiveness of classroom interventions are discussed in detail. And because assessing engagement is still a relatively new endeavor, chapters on measurement methods and issues round out this important resource. Topical areas addressed in the Handbook include: Engagement across developmental stages. Self-efficacy in the engaged learner. Parental and social influences on engagement and achievement motivation. The engaging nature of teaching for competency development. The relationship between engagement and high-risk behavior in adolescents. Comparing methods for measuring student engagement. An essential guide to the expanding knowledge base, the Handbook of Research on Student Engagement serves as a valuable resource for researchers, scientist-practitioners, and graduate students in such varied fields as clinical child and school psychology, educational psychology, public health, teaching and teacher education, social work, and educational policy.

Cultural Responsiveness And School Education With Particular Focus On Australia S First Peoples

Author: Thelma Faye Perso
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780987153593
Size: 54.22 MB
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"The purpose of this paper is to review the literature on CRS [Culturally responsive services in schooling (Culturally Responsive Schooling)]. While special focus is given to this issue, for the schooling of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and young people in Australia the review also draws on literature from around the world, particularly from the large body of evidence in the United States of America on American Indian and Alaskan Native children.'--Executive summary.

Decolonizing Education

Author: Marie Battiste
Publisher: UBC Press
ISBN: 1895830893
Size: 61.42 MB
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Drawing on treaties, international law, the work of other Indigenous scholars, and especially personal experiences, Marie Battiste documents the nature of Eurocentric models of education, and their devastating impacts on Indigenous knowledge. Chronicling the negative consequences of forced assimilation, racism inherent to colonial systems of education, and the failure of current educational policies for Aboriginal populations, Battiste proposes a new model of education, arguing the preservation of Aboriginal knowledge is an Aboriginal right. Central to this process is the repositioning of Indigenous humanities, sciences, and languages as vital fields of knowledge, revitalizing a knowledge system which incorporates both Indigenous and Eurocentric thinking.

Local Science Vs Global Science

Author: Paul Sillitoe
Publisher: Berghahn Books
ISBN: 0857455516
Size: 33.39 MB
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While science has achieved a remarkable understanding of nature, affording humans an astonishing technological capability, it has led, through Euro-American global domination, to the muting of other cultural views and values, even threatening their continued existence. There is a growing realization that the diversity of knowledge systems demand respect, some refer to them in a conservation idiom as alternative information banks. The scientific perspective is only one. We now have many examples of the soundness of local science and practices, some previously considered “primitive” and in need of change, but this book goes beyond demonstrating the soundness of local science and arguing for the incorporation of others’ knowledge in development, to argue that we need to look quizzically at the foundations of science itself and further challenge its hegemony, not only over local communities in Africa, Asia, the Pacific or wherever, but also the global community. The issues are large and the challenges are exciting, as addressed in this book, in a range of ethnographic and institutional contexts.

Self Narrative And Pedagogy

Author: Mike Hayler
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 9463510230
Size: 66.17 MB
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In this book, teachers from a variety of backgrounds reflect upon their journeys into and within teaching to discuss the impact of their diverse experiences on the ways in which they teach. The authors adopt a variety of autoethnographic approaches in telling stories of transition and profound transformation as they each discuss how certain events in their lives have shaped their professional identities and methods of teaching. In telling their stories they also tell stories of the culture and process of education. This offers the opportunity to consider the narratives as examples of how individuals and groups respond in different ways to institutional and national policies on education. In these chapters, the authors offer illumination from a number of perspectives, of how practitioners of education make meaning of their lives and work in our changing times. By capturing these personal stories, this book will inform and support readers who are studying to become teachers and those already working in education by developing their understanding and empathy with the role. Autoethnography can develop self-knowledge and understanding in the reader and writer of such texts, offering unique insights and individual ways of being that will benefit students and staff in a range of educational settings. This book values the telling and sharing of stories as a strategy for enabling teachers to learn from one another and help them to feel more supported. The book will be useful for teachers and teacher educators, students of education, and all researchers interested in autoethnography and self-narrative.

Education And Development In Zimbabwe

Author: Edward Shizha
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9460916066
Size: 19.38 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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The book represents a contribution to policy formulation and design in an increasingly knowledge economy in Zimbabwe. It challenges scholars to think about the role of education, its funding and the egalitarian approach to widening access to education. The nexus between education, democracy and policy change is a complex one. The book provides an illuminating account of the constantly evolving notions of national identity, language and citizenship from the Zimbabwean experience. The book discusses educational successes and challenges by examining the ideological effects of social, political and economic considerations on Zimbabwe’s colonial and postcolonial education. Currently, literature on current educational challenges in Zimbabwe is lacking and there is very little published material on these ideological effects on educational development in Zimbabwe. This book is likely to be one of the first on the impact of social, political and economic meltdown on education. The book is targeted at local and international academics and scholars of history of education and comparative education, scholars of international education and development, undergraduate and graduate students, and professors who are interested in educational development in Africa, particularly Zimbabwe. Notwithstanding, the book is a valuable resource to policy makers, educational administrators and researchers and the wider community. Shizha and Kariwo’s book is an important and illuminating addition on the effects of social, political and economic trajectories on education and development in Zimbabwe. It critically analyses the crucial specifics of the Zimbabwean situation by providing an in depth discourse on education at this historical juncture. The book offers new insights that may be useful for an understanding of not only the Zimbabwean case, but also education in other African countries. Rosemary Gordon, Senior Lecturer in Educational Foundations, University of Zimbabwe Ranging in temporal scope from the colonial era and its elitist legacy through the golden era of populist, universal elementary education to the disarray of contemporary socioeconomic crisis; covering elementary through higher education and touching thematically on everything from the pernicious effects of social adjustment programmes through the local deprofessionalization of teaching, this text provides a comprehensive, wide ranging and yet carefully detailed account of education in Zimbabwe. This engagingly written portrayal will prove illuminating not only to readers interested in Zimbabwe’s education specifically but more widely to all who are interested in how the sociopolitical shapes education- how ideology, policy, international pressures, economic factors and shifts in values collectively forge the historical and contemporary character of a country’s education. Handel Kashope Wright, Professor of Education, University of British Columbia