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Narrative Matters

Author: Dr Grant Bage
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135699747
Size: 37.63 MB
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In recent years there has been a massive revival of interest internationally in what story can offer to education. This book covers a range of issues at the heart of teaching history, such as the use of talk, the pitfalls of narrative as a pedagogical tool, translating curriculum content into lessons, story telling and story making. It also questions what it means to teach, the difficulties for teachers of remaining constructively critical of policy, and their own practice, during periods of national legislation and change.

Teaching History For The Common Good

Author: Keith C. Barton
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135645140
Size: 46.54 MB
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In Teaching History for the Common Good, Barton and Levstik present a clear overview of competing ideas among educators, historians, politicians, and the public about the nature and purpose of teaching history, and they evaluate these debates in light of current research on students' historical thinking. In many cases, disagreements about what should be taught to the nation's children and how it should be presented reflect fundamental differences that will not easily be resolved. A central premise of this book, though, is that systematic theory and research can play an important role in such debates by providing evidence of how students think, how their ideas interact with the information they encounter both in school and out, and how these ideas differ across contexts. Such evidence is needed as an alternative to the untested assumptions that plague so many discussions of history education. The authors review research on students' historical thinking and set it in the theoretical context of mediated action--an approach that calls attention to the concrete actions that people undertake, the human agents responsible for such actions, the cultural tools that aid and constrain them, their purposes, and their social contexts. They explain how this theory allows educators to address the breadth of practices, settings, purposes, and tools that influence students' developing understanding of the past, as well as how it provides an alternative to the academic discipline of history as a way of making decisions about teaching and learning the subject in schools. Beyond simply describing the factors that influence students' thinking, Barton and Levstik evaluate their implications for historical understanding and civic engagement. They base these evaluations not on the disciplinary study of history, but on the purpose of social education--preparing students for participation in a pluralist democracy. Their ultimate concern is how history can help citizens engage in collaboration toward the common good. In Teaching History for the Common Good, Barton and Levstik: *discuss the contribution of theory and research, explain the theory of mediated action and how it guides their analysis, and describe research on children's (and adults') knowledge of and interest in history; *lay out a vision of pluralist, participatory democracy and its relationship to the humanistic study of history as a basis for evaluating the perspectives on the past that influence students' learning; *explore four principal "stances" toward history (identification, analysis, moral response, and exhibition), review research on the extent to which children and adolescents understand and accept each of these, and examine how the stances might contribute to--or detract from--participation in a pluralist democracy; *address six of the principal "tools" of history (narrative structure, stories of individual achievement and motivation, national narratives, inquiry, empathy as perspective-taking, and empathy as caring); and *review research and conventional wisdom on teachers' knowledge and practice, and argue that for teachers to embrace investigative, multi-perspectival approaches to history they need more than knowledge of content and pedagogy, they need a guiding purpose that can be fulfilled only by these approaches--and preparation for participatory democracy provides such purpose. Teaching History for the Common Good is essential reading for history and social studies professionals, researchers, teacher educators, and students, as well as for policymakers, parents, and members of the general public who are interested in history education or in students' thinking and learning about the subject.

Teaching History In Primary Schools

Author: Pat Hoodless
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 1844455513
Size: 19.19 MB
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This book introduces trainees and newly qualified teachers to the teaching of history in primary schools, and covers key concepts, skills and knowledge for the history curriculum at Foundation Stage, KS1 and KS2. Contents include planning, teaching and learning strategies, assessment, reflection and evaluation, as well as a range of practical ideas for classroom activities and cross-curricular themes. Each chapter is underpinned by national and international research; also included are links to important themes such as citizenship, out-of-school learning, sustainability, diversity and inclusive practice. Throughout, content is related to new initiatives such as Every Child Matters and Excellence and Enjoyment.

Teaching And Learning History 11 18

Author: Alison Kitson
Publisher: McGraw-Hill Education (UK)
ISBN: 033523822X
Size: 69.46 MB
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Drawing on cutting edge research and practice, this book draws together recent thinking in teaching and learning in history, teaching and learning in secondary education more generally and classroom-based research to provide a radical re-thinking of the practices of teaching and learning about the past at the beginning of the twenty-first century.

Narrative Matters In Medical Contexts Across Disciplines

Author: Franziska Gygax
Publisher:
ISBN: 9789027226600
Size: 77.55 MB
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This collection of original chapters gives center stage to the concept of 'narrative' in medical contexts. The contributors come from the disciplines of literary and cultural studies, linguistics, psychology, and medicine and work with texts as diverse as autobiographies, graphic novels, Renaissance medical treatises and reports, short stories, reflective writing, creative writing, and online narratives. The interdisciplinary dialogue shows the richness and scope of the concept 'narrative' and demonstrates how crucial it is for practices in the medical context as well as in the contributing disciplines. The collection raises awareness of the great variety and multivocality of narratives on the experience of illness besides paying heed to the many different positions and angles from which these narratives can be perceived, read, and analyzed. The wide range of approaches assembled in this collection provides a comprehensive view on illness and health and on the multiple ways in which they are represented in narrative.

Writing History 7 11

Author: Hilary Cooper
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317664515
Size: 48.33 MB
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Writing History 7-11 supports students and primary teachers helping them to explore ways in which activities involving the talk that underpins historical enquiry can be developed into reading and exciting, extended, reflective writing. The step that teachers and pupils take from ‘talk for learning’ to ‘talk for writing’ is a vital one. In this book the authors argue that all aspects of historical enquiry leading to writing involve discussion and dialogue which permeate every aspect of ‘doing history’. From this perspective they set out a theoretical framework for understanding the role of talk and reading in developing pupils’ critical thinking and confident reflective writing, then demonstrate through a series of case studies, in which teachers, university lecturers and pupils work together, how the theory is put into practice in the classroom. Themes include: How to support children in writing in a variety of interesting genres How to make links between the National Curriculum (2013) for History and for English How to plan for breadth and depth studies in the new National Curriculum How activities in History 5 – 11 can be developed into exciting extended writing The second half of the book draws upon case studies from a number of real primary classrooms with children of different ages. Each case study shows how teaching was planned to develop children’s confidence and enjoyment in discussion and to scaffold reasoned, written explanation and argument. Topics presented are all relevant to the new curriculum framework and include talking and reading about: Time, change and significance over 6000 years - writing a television script Celtic Britain and the Roman Army - writing a travel brochure about Celtic Britain The destruction of Roman towns - writing a Saxon poem An archaeological investigation of a body in a Danish peat bog - writing a newspaper report Did any countries benefit from WW11? - writing an argued viewpoint The expansion westwards of European settlers - writing a flap book exploring different perspectives. This indispensable book provides not only sources for pupils to use in their writing, but also models and exemplars of different styles and voices to draw upon.

Teaching As Story Telling

Author: Kieran Egan
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226190327
Size: 11.61 MB
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"I am very impressed by the practicality of [Egan's] introduction of the use of story-forms in curriculum for young children. His model is fascinating, and its various possibilities in a range of fields makes it worth a good look by many kinds of teachers."—Maxine Greene, Teachers College, Columbia

Teaching History

Author: Ian Phillips
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 1446245381
Size: 52.28 MB
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Reflective practice is at the heart of effective teaching, and this book will help you develop into a reflective teacher of history. Everything you need is here: guidance on developing your analysis and self-evaluation skills, the knowledge of what you are trying to achieve and why, and examples of how experienced teachers deliver successful lessons. The book shows you how to plan lessons, how to make the best use of resources and how to assess pupils' progress effectively. Each chapter contains points for reflection, which encourage you to break off from your reading and think about the challenging questions that you face as a history teacher. The book comes with access to a companion website, where you will find: - Videos of real lessons so you can see the skills discussed in the text in action - Transcripts from teachers and students that you can use as tools for reflection - Links to a range of sites that provide useful additional support - Extra planning and resource materials. If you are training to teach history, citizenship or social sciences this book will help you to improve your classroom performance by providing you with practical advice, and also by helping you to think in depth about the key issues. It provides examples of the research evidence that is needed in academic work at Masters level, essential for anyone undertaking an M-level PGCE. Ian Phillips is course leader for PGCE History (and Teaching and Learning Fellow) at Edge Hill University.

Understanding History Teaching

Author: Christopher T. Husbands
Publisher: Open Univ Pr
ISBN: 9780335212729
Size: 71.93 MB
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* Why do we teach and learn about the past? * How is history taught in schools? * What are the influences on the way teachers teach and pupils learn about the past? History is one of the most ideologically disputed of school subjects. Over the past generation, the subject has experienced fundamental changes in content, pedagogy and approach. This book is the first detailed account of the way history is taught in schools to be published for 30 years. Drawing on fieldwork in comprehensive schools, and on research studies worldwide, the authors pose fundamental questions about the way teachers teach and learners learn. They consider its purposes on teaching about the past in a world of accelerating change. The book sets out to explore the realities of classroom history teaching and to offer pointers for the development on the subject in a new century.