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National Responsibility And Global Justice

Author: David Miller
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199235058
Size: 29.75 MB
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Steering a middle course between cosmopolitanism and a narrow nationalism, the book develops an original theory of global justice that also addresses controversial topics such as immigration and reparations for historic wrongdoing.

National Responsibility And Global Justice

Author: David Miller
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 9780199650712
Size: 66.34 MB
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Steering a middle course between cosmopolitanism and a narrow nationalism, the book develops an original theory of global justice that also addresses controversial topics such as immigration and reparations for historic wrongdoing.

National Responsibility And Global Justice

Author: David Miller
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN:
Size: 45.63 MB
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Steering a middle course between cosmopolitanism and a narrow nationalism, the book develops an original theory of global justice that also addresses controversial topics such as immigration and reparations for historic wrongdoing.

Just Responsibility

Author: Brooke A. Ackerly
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 019066293X
Size: 22.90 MB
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It has been well-established that many of the injustices that people around the world experience every day, from food insecurity to unsafe labor conditions and natural disasters, are the result of wide-scale structural problems of politics and economics. These are not merely random personal problems or consequences of bad luck or bad planning. Confronted by this fact, it is natural to ask what should or can we do to mitigate everyday injustices? In one sense, we answer this question when we buy the local homeless street newspaper, decide where to buy our clothes, remember our reusable bags when we shop, donate to disaster relief, or send letters to corporations about labor rights. But given the global scale of injustices related to poverty, environmental change, gender, and labor, can these individual acts really impact the seemingly intractable global social, political, and economic structures that perpetuate and exacerbate them? Moreover, can we respond to injustices in the world in ways that do more than just address their consequences? In this book, Brooke A. Ackerly both answers the question of what should we do, and shows that it's the wrong question to ask. To ask the right question, we need to ground our normative theory of global justice in the lived experience of injustice. Using a feminist critical methodology, she argues that what to do about injustice is not just an ethical or moral question, but a political question about assuming responsibility for injustice, regardless of our causal responsibility and extent of our knowledge of the injustice. Furthermore, it is a matter that needs to be guided by principles of human rights. As she argues, while many understand human rights as political goals or entitlements, they can also guide political strategy. Her aims are twofold: to present a theory of what it means to take responsibility for injustice and for ensuring human rights, as well as to develop a guide for how to take responsibility in ways that support local and global movements for transformative politics. In order to illustrate her theory and guide for action, Ackerly draws on fieldwork on the Rana Plaza collapse in 2013, the food crisis of 2008, and strategies from 125 activist organizations working on women's and labor rights across 26 countries. Just Responsibility integrates these ways of taking political responsibility into a rich theory of political community, accountability, and leadership in which taking responsibility for injustice itself transforms the fabric of political life.

World Poverty And Human Rights

Author: Thomas W. Pogge
Publisher: Polity
ISBN: 0745641431
Size: 68.85 MB
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Thomas Pogge tries to explain how most of the population of this planet can excuse world poverty. A mere one or two % of the wealth of the richer nations could help in eradicating much of the poverty but there's a slim chance of that happening.

Responsibility For Justice

Author: Iris Marion Young
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 019988935X
Size: 33.90 MB
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When the noted political philosopher Iris Marion Young died in 2006, her death was mourned as the passing of "one of the most important political philosophers of the past quarter-century" (Cass Sunstein) and as an important and innovative thinker working at the conjunction of a number of important topics: global justice; democracy and difference; continental political theory; ethics and international affairs; and gender, race and public policy. In her long-awaited Responsibility for Justice, Young discusses our responsibilities to address "structural" injustices in which we among many are implicated (but for which we not to blame), often by virtue of participating in a market, such as buying goods produced in sweatshops, or participating in booming housing markets that leave many homeless. Young argues that addressing these structural injustices requires a new model of responsibility, which she calls the "social connection" model. She develops this idea by clarifying the nature of structural injustice; developing the notion of political responsibility for injustice and how it differs from older ideas of blame and guilt; and finally how we can then use this model to describe our responsibilities to others no matter who we are and where we live. With a foreward by Martha C. Nussbaum, this last statement by a revered and highly influential thinker will be of great interest to political theorists and philosophers, ethicists, and feminist and political philosophers.

Making Sense In The Social Sciences

Author: Margot Northey
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780199026784
Size: 55.69 MB
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Part of the bestselling Making Sense series, this seventh edition of Making Sense in the Social Sciences is an indispensable guide for students in any area of the discipline. Maintaining the signature straightforward style of the series, this book offers up-to-date, detailed information onproper documentation guidelines, essay and report writing, different methods of qualitative and quantitative research, ethical research, and more.

Global Justice

Author: Gillian Brock
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191552313
Size: 54.72 MB
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Gillian Brock develops a viable cosmopolitan model of global justice that takes seriously the equal moral worth of persons, yet leaves scope for defensible forms of nationalism and for other legitimate identifications and affiliations people have. Brock addresses two prominent kinds of skeptic about global justice: those who doubt its feasibility and those who believe that cosmopolitanism interferes illegitimately with the defensible scope of nationalism by undermining goods of national importance, such as authentic democracy or national self-determination. The model addresses concerns about implementation in the world, showing how we can move from theory to public policy that makes progress toward global justice. It also makes clear how legitimate forms of nationalism are compatible with commitments to global justice. Global Justice is divided into three central parts. In the first, Brock defends a cosmopolitan model of global justice. In the second, which is largely concerned with public policy issues, she argues that there is much we can and should do toward achieving global justice. She addresses several pressing problems, discussing both theoretical and public policy issues involved with each. These include tackling global poverty, taxation reform, protection of basic liberties, humanitarian intervention, immigration, and problems associated with global economic arrangements. In the third part, she shows how the discussion of public policy issues can usefully inform our theorizing; in particular, it assists our thinking about the place of nationalism and equality in an account of global justice.

Multicultural Citizenship

Author: Will Kymlicka
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0198290918
Size: 20.23 MB
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The increasingly multicultural fabric of modern societies has given rise to many new conflicts, as ethnic minorities and national minorities demand recognition and support for their cultural identity. Writing in a clear and non-technical way, Will Kymlicka, the leading political philosopher of his generation, provides the most comprehensive analysis to date of this crucial political issue.

Justice Beyond Borders

Author: Simon Caney
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199297967
Size: 60.62 MB
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Which political principles should govern global politics? Simon Caney engages with the work of philosophers, political theorists, and international relations scholars to examine some of the most pressing global issues of our time. Are there universal civil, political, and economic human rights? Can humanitarian intervention be justified?