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Why You Can T Teach United States History Without American Indians

Author: Susan Sleeper-Smith
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469621215
Size: 38.58 MB
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A resource for all who teach and study history, this book illuminates the unmistakable centrality of American Indian history to the full sweep of American history. The nineteen essays gathered in this collaboratively produced volume, written by leading scholars in the field of Native American history, reflect the newest directions of the field and are organized to follow the chronological arc of the standard American history survey. Contributors reassess major events, themes, groups of historical actors, and approaches--social, cultural, military, and political--consistently demonstrating how Native American people, and questions of Native American sovereignty, have animated all the ways we consider the nation's past. The uniqueness of Indigenous history, as interwoven more fully in the American story, will challenge students to think in new ways about larger themes in U.S. history, such as settlement and colonization, economic and political power, citizenship and movements for equality, and the fundamental question of what it means to be an American. Contributors are Chris Andersen, Juliana Barr, David R. M. Beck, Jacob Betz, Paul T. Conrad, Mikal Brotnov Eckstrom, Margaret D. Jacobs, Adam Jortner, Rosalyn R. LaPier, John J. Laukaitis, K. Tsianina Lomawaima, Robert J. Miller, Mindy J. Morgan, Andrew Needham, Jean M. O'Brien, Jeffrey Ostler, Sarah M. S. Pearsall, James D. Rice, Phillip H. Round, Susan Sleeper-Smith, and Scott Manning Stevens.

Places In Motion

Author: Jacob N. Kinnard
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199359687
Size: 53.12 MB
Format: PDF
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Jacob Kinnard offers an in-depth examination of the complex dynamics of religiously charged places. Focusing on several important shared and contested pilgrimage places-Ground Zero and Devils Tower in the United States, Ayodhya and Bodhgaya in India, Karbala in Iraq-he poses a number of crucial questions. What and who has made these sites important, and why? How are they shared, and how and why are they contested? What is at stake in their contestation? How are the particular identities of place and space established? How are individual and collective identity intertwined with space and place? Challenging long-accepted, clean divisions of the religious world, Kinnard explores specific instances of the vibrant messiness of religious practice, the multivocality of religious objects, the fluid and hybrid dynamics of religious places, and the shifting and tangled identities of religious actors. He contends that sacred space is a constructed idea: places are not sacred in and of themselves, but are sacred because we make them sacred. As such, they are in perpetual motion, transforming themselves from moment to moment and generation to generation. Places in Motion moves comfortably across and between a variety of historical and cultural settings as well as academic disciplines, providing a deft and sensitive approach to the topic of sacred places, with awareness of political, economic, and social realities as these exist in relation to questions of identity. It is a lively and much needed critical advance in analytical reflections on sacred space and pilgrimage.

Native American Justice

Author: Laurence French
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 9780830415755
Size: 33.56 MB
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Tracing the history of U.S. Indian policy from the eighteenth century to the present, this book explores how the Euro-American ethos of Manifest Destiny fueled a devastating campaign of ethnic cleansing against Native Americans. After decimating the Indian population through organized massacres, the U.S. government forcibly removed the survivors from their homelands to live on reservations. Physical genocide gave way to attempts at cultural eradication through policies designed to Christianize and civilize the Indians. These policies included the traumatic separation of children from their families for indoctrination and abuse in remote boarding schools. Treaties and policies are linked to the concept of federal paternalism and its relationship to pervasive health and social problems endemic in Indian country, including substance abuse and addiction. The book is divided into three main parts. Part I covers the US government's treatment of Indians from the colonial era to the present. Part II describes how the Cherokees' aboriginal concept of blood vengeance gave way to justice models based on the Protestant ethic. Part II also discusses governmental restrictions of religious expression by Indians. Part III delves into the judicial system within Indian country, looking at tribal courts, the Navajo court system, law enforcement, and corrections. An epilogue covers the incompleteness of social justice in Indian country, as reflected in problems such as the misuse of Indian money by the federal government. A Burnham Publishers book

When Sorry Isn T Enough

Author: Roy L. Brooks
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 9780814713310
Size: 25.12 MB
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"This anthology is a collection of essays, written by both internationally renowned and emerging scholars, and of public documents that concern claims from around the world which seek redress for human injustice"--Preface.