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New Mexico And The Pimer A Alta

Author: John G. Douglass
Publisher: University Press of Colorado
ISBN: 1607325748
Size: 47.58 MB
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Focusing on the two major areas of the Southwest that witnessed the most intensive and sustained colonial encounters, New Mexico and the Pimería Alta compares how different forms of colonialism and indigenous political economies resulted in diverse outcomes for colonists and Native peoples. Taking a holistic approach and studying both colonist and indigenous perspectives through archaeological, ethnohistorical, historical, and landscape data, contributors examine how the processes of colonialism played out in the American Southwest. Although these broad areas—New Mexico and southern Arizona/northern Sonora—share a similar early colonial history, the particular combination of players, sociohistorical trajectories, and social relations within each area led to, and were transformed by, markedly diverse colonial encounters. Understanding these different mixes of players, history, and social relations provides the foundation for conceptualizing the enormous changes wrought by colonialism throughout the region. The presentations of different cultural trajectories also offer important avenues for future thought and discussion on the strategies for missionization and colonialism. The case studies tackle how cultures evolved in the light of radical transformations in cultural traits or traditions and how different groups reconciled to this change. A much needed up-to-date examination of the colonial era in the Southwest, New Mexico and the Pimería Alta demonstrates the intertwined relationships between cultural continuity and transformation during a time of immense change and highlights contemporary thought on the colonial experience. Contributors: Joseph Aguilar, Jimmy Arterberry, Heather Atherton, Dale Brenneman, J. Andrew Darling, John G. Douglass, B. Sunday Eiselt, Severin Fowles, William M. Graves, Lauren Jelinek, Kelly L. Jenks, Stewart B. Koyiyumptewa, Phillip O. Leckman, Matthew Liebmann, Kent G. Lightfoot, Lindsay Montgomery, Barnet Pavao-Zuckerman, Robert Preucel, Matthew Schmader, Thomas E. Sheridan, Colleen Strawhacker, J. Homer Thiel, David Hurst Thomas, Laurie D. Webster

The Oxford Handbook Of Southwest Archaeology

Author: Barbara Mills
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190697466
Size: 50.66 MB
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The American Southwest is one of the most important archaeological regions in the world, with many of the best-studied examples of hunter-gatherer and village-based societies. Research has been carried out in the region for well over a century, and during this time the Southwest has repeatedly stood at the forefront of the development of new archaeological methods and theories. Moreover, research in the Southwest has long been a key site of collaboration between archaeologists, ethnographers, historians, linguists, biological anthropologists, and indigenous intellectuals. This volume marks the most ambitious effort to take stock of the empirical evidence, theoretical orientations, and historical reconstructions of the American Southwest. Over seventy top scholars have joined forces to produce an unparalleled survey of state of archaeological knowledge in the region. Themed chapters on particular methods and theories are accompanied by comprehensive overviews of the culture histories of particular archaeological sequences, from the initial Paleoindian occupation, to the rise of a major ritual center in Chaco Canyon, to the onset of the Spanish and American imperial projects. The result is an essential volume for any researcher working in the region as well as any archaeologist looking to take the pulse of contemporary trends in this key research tradition.

From Savages To Subjects

Author: Robert H. Jackson
Publisher: M.E. Sharpe
ISBN: 9780765605979
Size: 58.86 MB
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Incorporating recent findings by leading Southwest scholars as well as original research, this book takes a fresh new look at the history of Spanish missions in northern Mexico/the American Southwest during the 17th and 18th centuries. Far from a record of heroic missionaries, steadfast soldiers, and colonial administrators, it examines the experiences of the natives brought to live on the missions, and the ways in which the mission program attempted to change just about every aspect of indigenous life. Emphasizing the effect of the missions on native populations, demographic patterns, economics, and socio-cultural change, this path-breaking work fills a major gap in the history of the Southwest.

Spain In The Southwest

Author: John L. Kessell
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
ISBN: 0806189444
Size: 18.25 MB
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John L. Kessell’s Spain in the Southwest presents a fast-paced, abundantly illustrated history of the Spanish colonies that became the states of New Mexico, Arizona, Texas, and California. With an eye for human interest, Kessell tells the story of New Spain’s vast frontier--today’s American Southwest and Mexican North--which for two centuries served as a dynamic yet disjoined periphery of the Spanish empire. Chronicling the period of Hispanic activity from the time of Columbus to Mexico’s independence from Spain in 1821, Kessell traces the three great swells of Hispanic exploration, encounter, and influence that rolled north from Mexico across the coasts and high deserts of the western borderlands. Throughout this sprawling historical landscape, Kessell treats grand themes through the lives of individuals. He explains the frequent cultural clashes and accommodations in remarkably balanced terms. Stereotypes, the author writes, are of no help. Indians could be arrogant and brutal, Spaniards caring, and vice versa. If we select the facts to fit preconceived notions, we can make the story come out the way we want, but if the peoples of the colonial Southwest are seen as they really were--more alike than diverse, sharing similar inconstant natures--then we need have no favorites.

Frontiers Of Colonialism

Author: Christine D. Beaule
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780813054346
Size: 71.61 MB
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For decades archaeologists have limited studies of frontiers and colonialism to a single polity, empire, or epoch. This has been especially true of historical archaeologists; but in this intriguing collection, Beaule assembles archaeologists from around the world to determine the commonalities and differences of colonialism across the self-imposed divide of contact v. pre-contact. The work considers the expanding frontiers of the Romans, Iroquois, Egyptians, Filipinos, and the more familiar Mayan and Incan empires. The goal of this volume is to expand the theoretical interpretations and perspectives to all archaeologists working in frontier/colonial contexts, not just those of the European empires.

Indian Revolts In Northern New Spain

Author: Roberto Mario Salmón
Publisher: University Press of America
ISBN: 9780819179838
Size: 37.64 MB
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This book surveys and evaluates Indian revolts in northern New Spain during the years 1680-1786 in terms of specific Indian revolts, Spanish Indian policy over time, and relations between Spaniards, mestizo frontiersmen, and Indians. In this study, northern New Spain refers to what is now the Mexican North and the southwestern United States. This northern frontier came to encompass the provinces of Nueva Vizcaya, New Mexico, Sonora, Coahuila, Texas, Sinaloa, and the two Californias. This territory eventually became a separate, distinct administrative unit of colonial Spanish America. Contents: Settlement of Northern New Spain; Times of Trouble: Rise of the Tepehuan and Tarahumara Barrier; The Pueblo and Tarahumara Revolts; Missionaries and Bureaucrats: A Chaotic Arrangement; Frontier Warfare: A Legacy of Revolt 1724-1754; The Reorganization of Presidio Defenses; Creation of the Commandancy General and the Yuma Bid for Freedom, 1776-1782; Seri, Tarahumara, and Gileno Resist Military Defense on the Northern Frontier.

Livestock Management In The American Southwest

Author: Roy Jemison
Publisher: Elsevier
ISBN:
Size: 61.13 MB
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Grazing, land use history, and grazing systems of the southwest; Range ecosystems; Economic, social, and cultural aspects of livestock production and management; Research and information needs and conclusions.

Gardens Of New Spain

Author: William W. Dunmire
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 23.77 MB
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"Gardens of New Spain is certainly approachable by gardeners, cooks, and amateurs of Southwestern studies as well as professional historians...it is an important addition to the sparse literature in English on the Old Southwest in the colonial era." —Sixteenth Century Journal "This scholarly document will be as enduring as the plants upon which it focuses and will reach a wide public audience because of its writing style." —New Mexico Historical Review "With a light hand, William Dunmire traces the fascinating journeys of plants—from the gardens of the Alhambra, to the floating gardens of Xochimilco, to the sunken gardens of California's Mission San Luis Rey, and to all points in between. Deeply learned, with splendid maps, illustrations, and tables, this is an invaluable reference, but it is also a delight to read." —David Weber, Robert and Nancy Dedman Professor of History and Director of the William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies, Southern Methodist University When the Spanish began colonizing the Americas in the late fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, they brought with them the plants and foods of their homeland—wheat, melons, grapes, vegetables, and every kind of Mediterranean fruit. Missionaries and colonists introduced these plants to the native peoples of Mexico and the American Southwest, where they became staple crops alongside the corn, beans, and squash that had traditionally sustained the original Americans. This intermingling of Old and New World plants and foods was one of the most significant fusions in the history of international cuisine and gave rise to many of the foods that we so enjoy today. Gardens of New Spain tells the fascinating story of the diffusion of plants, gardens, agriculture, and cuisine from late medieval Spain to the colonial frontier of Hispanic America. Beginning in the Old World, William Dunmire describes how Spain came to adopt plants and their foods from the Fertile Crescent, Asia, and Africa. Crossing the Atlantic, he first examines the agricultural scene of Pre-Columbian Mexico and the Southwest. Then he traces the spread of plants and foods introduced from the Mediterranean to Spain's settlements in Mexico, New Mexico, Arizona, Texas, and California. In lively prose, Dunmire tells stories of the settlers, missionaries, and natives who blended their growing and eating practices into regional plantways and cuisines that live on today in every corner of America.