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Nixon In The World

Author: Fredrik Logevall
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199717972
Size: 32.69 MB
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In the 1970s, the United States faced challenges on a number of fronts. By nearly every measure, American power was no longer unrivalled. The task of managing America's relative decline fell to President Richard Nixon, Henry Kissinger, and Gerald Ford. From 1969 to 1977, Nixon, Kissinger, and Ford reoriented U.S. foreign policy from its traditional poles of liberal interventionism and conservative isolationism into a policy of active but conservative engagement. In Nixon in the World, seventeen leading historians of the Cold War and U.S. foreign policy show how they did it, where they succeeded, and where they took their new strategy too far. Drawing on newly declassified materials, they provide authoritative and compelling analyses of issues such as Vietnam, d?tente, arms control, and the U.S.-China rapprochement, creating the first comprehensive volume on American foreign policy in this pivotal era.

Nixon In The World

Author: Fredrik Logevall
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 019988627X
Size: 41.29 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 4014
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In the 1970s, the United States faced challenges on a number of fronts. By nearly every measure, American power was no longer unrivalled. The task of managing America's relative decline fell to President Richard Nixon, Henry Kissinger, and Gerald Ford. From 1969 to 1977, Nixon, Kissinger, and Ford reoriented U.S. foreign policy from its traditional poles of liberal interventionism and conservative isolationism into a policy of active but conservative engagement. In Nixon in the World, seventeen leading historians of the Cold War and U.S. foreign policy show how they did it, where they succeeded, and where they took their new strategy too far. Drawing on newly declassified materials, they provide authoritative and compelling analyses of issues such as Vietnam, d?tente, arms control, and the U.S.-China rapprochement, creating the first comprehensive volume on American foreign policy in this pivotal era.

Nixon In The World American Foreign Relations 1969 1977

Author: Fredrik Logevall
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 019988627X
Size: 35.70 MB
Format: PDF
View: 1857
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In the 1970s, the United States faced challenges on a number of fronts. By nearly every measure, American power was no longer unrivalled. The task of managing America's relative decline fell to President Richard Nixon, Henry Kissinger, and Gerald Ford. From 1969 to 1977, Nixon, Kissinger, and Ford reoriented U.S. foreign policy from its traditional poles of liberal interventionism and conservative isolationism into a policy of active but conservative engagement. In Nixon in the World, seventeen leading historians of the Cold War and U.S. foreign policy show how they did it, where they succeeded, and where they took their new strategy too far. Drawing on newly declassified materials, they provide authoritative and compelling analyses of issues such as Vietnam, detente, arms control, and the U.S.-China rapprochement, creating the first comprehensive volume on American foreign policy in this pivotal era.

Debating Franklin D Roosevelt S Foreign Policies 1933 1945

Author: Justus D. Doenecke
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 9780847694167
Size: 60.58 MB
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Franklin D. Roosevelt led the United States through some of the most dramatic and trying foreign and domestic episodes in its history. In Debating Franklin D. Roosevelt's Foreign Policies, noted historians Justus D. Doenecke and Mark A. Stoler offer strongly differing perspectives on the Roosevelt years, finding disparate meanings from common data. Through their contrary viewpoints, supplemented by carefully-chosen documents, readers are empowered to examine the issues and draw their own conclusions about FDR's controversial foreign policy.

No End Save Victory

Author: David Kaiser
Publisher: Basic Books
ISBN: 0465062997
Size: 44.51 MB
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An acclaimed historian reveals how Roosevelt and his cabinet engineered America's entry into—and ultimate victory in—World War II.

From Roosevelt To Truman

Author: Wilson D. Miscamble
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521862442
Size: 17.82 MB
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From Roosevelt to Truman initially investigates Truman's foreign policy background and then examines the legacy that FDR bequeathed to him.

Woodrow Wilson And The Great War

Author: Robert W. Tucker
Publisher: University of Virginia Press
ISBN: 9780813926292
Size: 47.93 MB
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In recent years, and in light of U.S. attempts to project power in the world, the presidency of Woodrow Wilson has been more commonly invoked than ever before. Yet "Wilsonianism" has often been distorted by a concentration on American involvement in the First World War. In Woodrow Wilson and the Great War: Reconsidering America’s Neutrality, 1914-1917, prominent scholar Robert Tucker turns the focus to the years of neutrality. Arguing that our neglect of this prewar period has reduced the complexity of the historical Wilson to a caricature or stereotype, Tucker reveals the importance that the law of neutrality played in Wilson’s foreign policy during the fateful years from 1914 to 1917, and in doing so he provides a more complete portrait of our nation’s twenty-eighth president. By focusing on the years leading up to America’s involvement in the Great War, Tucker reveals that Wilson’s internationalism was always highly qualified, dependent from the start upon the advent of an international order that would forever remove the specter of another major war. World War I was the last conflict in which the law of neutrality played an important role in the calculations of belligerents and neutrals, and it is scarcely an exaggeration to say that this law—or rather Woodrow Wilson’s version of it—constituted almost the whole of his foreign policy with regard to the war. Wilson’s refusal to find any significance, moral or otherwise, in the conflict beyond the law and its violation led him to see the war as meaningless, save for the immense suffering and sense of utter futility it fostered. Treating issues of enduring interest, such as the advisability and effectiveness of U.S. interventions in, or initiation of, conflicts beyond its borders, Woodrow Wilson and the Great War will appeal to anyone interested in the president’s power to determine foreign policy, and in constitutional history in general.

Nixon Kissinger Years

Author: Richard C. Thornton
Publisher: Paragon House
ISBN:
Size: 13.17 MB
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From 1968 to 1976, the dominant issue of American foreign policy was attempting to formulate a response to steadily increasing Soviet military power. Yet, as a result of the mire of Watergate, clout in the area of US-Soviet relations during this period slipped from the hands of Richard Nixon to those of Secretary of State Henry Kissinger. Richard Thornton argues that Watergate was a "set up" by John Mitchell and members of the Eastern wing of the Republican Party to oust Nixon. At the heart of Thornton's examination lies the assessment of how Kissinger was able to move the United States away from Nixon's traditional containment policy to "tri-lateralism" and a greater dependence on collective security organizations. This revised and expanded edition is a major contribution to the study of foreign affairs and it also serves as an critical balance to Kissinger's own volumes of memoirs.

The Oil Kings

Author: Andrew Scott Cooper
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1439157138
Size: 33.42 MB
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struggling with a recession . . . European nations at risk of defaulting on their loans . . . A possible global financial crisis. It happened before, in the 1970s. Oil Kings is the story of how oil came to dominate U.S. domestic and international affairs. As Richard Nixon fought off Watergate inquiries in 1973, the U.S. economy reacted to an oil shortage initiated by Arab nations in retaliation for American support of Israel in the Arab- Israeli war. The price of oil skyrocketed, causing serious inflation. One man the U.S. could rely on in the Middle East was the Shah of Iran, a loyal ally whose grand ambitions had made him a leading customer for American weapons. Iran sold the U.S. oil; the U.S. sold Iran missiles and fighter jets. But the Shah’s economy depended almost entirely on oil, and the U.S. economy could not tolerate annual double-digit increases in the price of this essential commodity. European economies were hit even harder by the soaring oil prices, and several NATO allies were at risk of default on their debt. In 1976, with the U.S. economy in peril, President Gerald Ford, locked in a tight election race, decided he had to find a country that would sell oil to the U.S. more cheaply and break the OPEC monopoly, which the Shah refused to do. On the advice of Treasury Secretary William Simon and against the advice of Secretary of State Henry Kissinger, Ford made a deal to sell advanced weaponry to the Saudis in exchange for a modest price hike on oil. Ford lost the election, but the deal had lasting consequences. The Shah’s economy was destabilized, and disaffected elements in Iran mobilized to overthrow him. The U.S. had embarked on a long relationship with the autocratic Saudi kingdom that continues to this day. Andrew Scott Cooper draws on newly declassified documents and interviews with some key figures of the time to show how Nixon, Ford, Kissinger, the CIA, and the State and Treasury departments—as well as the Shah and the Saudi royal family— maneuvered to control events in the Middle East. He details the secret U.S.-Saudi plan to circumvent OPEC that destabilized the Shah. He reveals how close the U.S. came to sending troops into the Persian Gulf to break the Arab oil embargo. The Oil Kings provides solid evidence that U.S. officials ignored warning signs of a potential hostage crisis in Iran. It discloses that U.S. officials offered to sell nuclear power and nuclear fuel to the Shah. And it shows how the Ford Administration barely averted a European debt crisis that could have triggered a financial catastrophe in the U.S. Brilliantly reported and filled with astonishing details about some of the key figures of the time, The Oil Kings is the history of an era that we thought we knew, an era whose momentous reverberations still influence events at home and abroad today.

The Trial Of Henry Kissinger

Author: Christopher Hitchens
Publisher: Verso
ISBN: 9781859843987
Size: 60.91 MB
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Calling upon personal testimony and documents released under the Freedom of Information Act, chronicles the life of Henry Kissinger, linking him to events including the war in Indochina and genocide in East Timor.