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Not Quite White

Author: Matt Wray
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822388596
Size: 70.71 MB
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White trash. The phrase conjures up images of dirty rural folk who are poor, ignorant, violent, and incestuous. But where did this stigmatizing phrase come from? And why do these stereotypes persist? Matt Wray answers these and other questions by delving into the long history behind this term of abuse and others like it. Ranging from the early 1700s to the early 1900s, Not Quite White documents the origins and transformations of the multiple meanings projected onto poor rural whites in the United States. Wray draws on a wide variety of primary sources—literary texts, folklore, diaries and journals, medical and scientific articles, social scientific analyses—to construct a dense archive of changing collective representations of poor whites. Of crucial importance are the ideas about poor whites that circulated through early-twentieth-century public health campaigns, such as hookworm eradication and eugenic reforms. In these crusades, impoverished whites, particularly but not exclusively in the American South, were targeted for interventions by sanitarians who viewed them as “filthy, lazy crackers” in need of racial uplift and by eugenicists who viewed them as a “feebleminded menace” to the white race, threats that needed to be confined and involuntarily sterilized. Part historical inquiry and part sociological investigation, Not Quite White demonstrates the power of social categories and boundaries to shape social relationships and institutions, to invent groups where none exist, and to influence policies and legislation that end up harming the very people they aim to help. It illuminates not only the cultural significance and consequences of poor white stereotypes but also how dominant whites exploited and expanded these stereotypes to bolster and defend their own fragile claims to whiteness.

Not Quite White

Author: Matt Wray
Publisher: Duke University Press Books
ISBN:
Size: 67.56 MB
Format: PDF
View: 5939
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White trash. The phrase conjures up images of dirty rural folk who are poor, ignorant, violent, and incestuous. But where did this stigmatizing phrase come from? And why do these stereotypes persist? Matt Wray answers these and other questions by delving into the long history behind this term of abuse and others like it. Ranging from the early 1700s to the early 1900s, Not Quite White documents the origins and transformations of the multiple meanings projected onto poor rural whites in the United States. Wray draws on a wide variety of primary sources—literary texts, folklore, diaries and journals, medical and scientific articles, social scientific analyses—to construct a dense archive of changing collective representations of poor whites. Of crucial importance are the ideas about poor whites that circulated through early-twentieth-century public health campaigns, such as hookworm eradication and eugenic reforms. In these crusades, impoverished whites, particularly but not exclusively in the American South, were targeted for interventions by sanitarians who viewed them as “filthy, lazy crackers” in need of racial uplift and by eugenicists who viewed them as a “feebleminded menace” to the white race, threats that needed to be confined and involuntarily sterilized. Part historical inquiry and part sociological investigation, Not Quite White demonstrates the power of social categories and boundaries to shape social relationships and institutions, to invent groups where none exist, and to influence policies and legislation that end up harming the very people they aim to help. It illuminates not only the cultural significance and consequences of poor white stereotypes but also how dominant whites exploited and expanded these stereotypes to bolster and defend their own fragile claims to whiteness.

White Trash

Author: Annalee Newitz
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135204489
Size: 30.36 MB
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First published in 1997. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Not Quite Not White

Author: Sharmila Sen
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1524705128
Size: 43.17 MB
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A first-generation immigrant's exploration of race and assimilation in the United States, an American's journey into the heart of not-whiteness. At the age of 12, Sharmila Sen emigrated from India to the U.S. The year was 1982, and everywhere she turned, she was asked to self-report her race - on INS forms, at the doctor's office, in middle school. Never identifying with a race in the India of her childhood, she rejects her new "not quite" designation - not quite white, not quite black, not quite Asian -- and spends much of her life attempting to blend into American whiteness. But after her teen years trying to assimilate--watching shows like General Hospital and The Jeffersons, dancing to Duran Duran and Prince, and perfecting the art of Jell-O no-bake desserts--she is forced to reckon with the hard questions: What does it mean to be white, why does whiteness retain the magic cloak of invisibility while other colors are made hypervisible, and how much does whiteness figure into Americanness? Part memoir, part manifesto, Not Quite Not White is a searing appraisal of race and a path forward for the next not quite not white generation --a witty and sharply honest story of discovering that not-whiteness can be the very thing that makes us American.

Odd Tribes

Author: John Hartigan
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822387204
Size: 79.46 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Odd Tribes challenges theories of whiteness and critical race studies by examining the tangles of privilege, debasement, power, and stigma that constitute white identity. Considering the relation of phantasmatic cultural forms such as the racial stereotype “white trash” to the actual social conditions of poor whites, John Hartigan Jr. generates new insights into the ways that race, class, and gender are fundamentally interconnected. By tracing the historical interplay of stereotypes, popular cultural representations, and the social sciences’ objectifications of poverty, Hartigan demonstrates how constructions of whiteness continually depend on the vigilant maintenance of class and gender decorums. Odd Tribes engages debates in history, anthropology, sociology, and cultural studies over how race matters. Hartigan tracks the spread of “white trash” from an epithet used only in the South prior to the Civil War to one invoked throughout the country by the early twentieth century. He also recounts how the cultural figure of “white trash” influenced academic and popular writings on the urban poor from the 1880s through the 1990s. Hartigan’s critical reading of the historical uses of degrading images of poor whites to ratify lines of color in this country culminates in an analysis of how contemporary performers such as Eminem and Roseanne Barr challenge stereotypical representations of “white trash” by claiming the identity as their own. Odd Tribes presents a compelling vision of what cultural studies can be when diverse research methodologies and conceptual frameworks are brought to bear on pressing social issues.

How Racism Takes Place

Author: George Lipsitz
Publisher: Temple University Press
ISBN: 1439902577
Size: 54.34 MB
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How racism shapes urban spaces and how African Americans create vibrant communities that offer models for more equitable social arrangements.

Faulkner And Whiteness

Author: Jay Watson
Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi
ISBN: 9781617030215
Size: 20.40 MB
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William Faulkner wrote during a tumultuous period in southern racial consciousness, between the years of the enactment of Jim Crow and the beginnings of the civil rights movement in the South. Throughout the writer's career racial paradigms were in flux, and these shifting notions are reflected in Faulkner's prose. Faulkner's fiction contains frequent questions about the ways in which white Americans view themselves with regard to race along with challenges to the racial codes and standards of the region, and complex portrayals of the interactions between blacks and whites. Throughout his work Faulkner contests white identity-its performance by whites and those passing for white, its role in shaping the South, and its assumption of normative identity in opposition to nonwhite "Others." This is true even in novels without a strong visible African American presence, such as As I Lay Dying, The Hamlet, The Town, and The Mansion. Faulkner and Whiteness explores the ways in which Faulkner’s fiction addresses and de-stabilizes the concept of whiteness in American culture. Collectively, the essays argue that whiteness, as part of the Nobel Laureate's consistent querying of racial dynamics, is a central element. This anthology places Faulkner’s oeuvre-and scholarly views of it-in the contexts of its contemporary literature and academic trends exploring race and texts.

Reconstructing Dixie

Author: Tara McPherson
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 9780822330400
Size: 43.90 MB
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DIVA cultural studies reading of white southern femininity as seen in a range of popular sites including novels, television, and tourist attractions./div

Re Orienting Whiteness

Author: K. Ellinghaus
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 0230101283
Size: 25.31 MB
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This book brings together historians from the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and Europe to historicize constructions of whiteness as a colonial formation. Confronting the privilege inherent in the invisibility of contemporary whiteness requires that the historical roots of racial power be interrogated, and the history of European colonialism is of much more than passing significance to this task. This collection functions to read the colonial back into whiteness by demonstrating how this racial category traveled around the routes of empire. It shows how a transnational focus can bring historical and spatial specificity to the study of whiteness and thus re-orients the frames of whiteness for American and non-American scholars alike.

Between Arab And White

Author: Sarah Gualtieri
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520255348
Size: 62.64 MB
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"Direct and accessible. A tour de force of research that demonstrates seemingly unlikely origins, evolutions, and contradictions of social identities."—George Lipsitz, author of Footsteps in the Dark and American Studies in a Moment of Danger