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Our Crime Was Being Jewish

Author: Anthony S. Pitch
Publisher: Skyhorse Publishing, Inc.
ISBN: 1632208547
Size: 16.59 MB
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In the shouted words of a woman bound for Auschwitz to a man about to escape from a cattle car, “If you get out, maybe you can tell the story! Who else will tell it?” Our Crime Was Being Jewish contains 576 vivid memories of 358 Holocaust survivors. These are the true, insider stories of victims, told in their own words. They include the experiences of teenagers who saw their parents and siblings sent to the gas chambers; of starving children beaten for trying to steal a morsel of food; of people who saw their friends commit suicide to save themselves from the daily agony they endured. The recollections are from the start of the war—the home invasions, the Gestapo busts, and the ghettos—as well as the daily hell of the concentration camps and what actually happened inside. Six million Jews were killed in the Holocaust, and this hefty collection of stories told by its survivors is one of the most important books of our time. It was compiled by award-winning author Anthony S. Pitch, who worked with sources such as the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum to get survivors’ stories compiled together and to supplement them with images from the war. These memories must be told and held onto so what happened is documented; so the lives of those who perished are not forgotten—so history does not repeat itself. Skyhorse Publishing, along with our Arcade, Good Books, Sports Publishing, and Yucca imprints, is proud to publish a broad range of biographies, autobiographies, and memoirs. Our list includes biographies on well-known historical figures like Benjamin Franklin, Nelson Mandela, and Alexander Graham Bell, as well as villains from history, such as Heinrich Himmler, John Wayne Gacy, and O. J. Simpson. We have also published survivor stories of World War II, memoirs about overcoming adversity, first-hand tales of adventure, and much more. While not every title we publish becomes a New York Times bestseller or a national bestseller, we are committed to books on subjects that are sometimes overlooked and to authors whose work might not otherwise find a home.

Left To Tell

Author: Immaculee Ilibagiza
Publisher: Hay House, Inc
ISBN: 1401944906
Size: 15.10 MB
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The remarkable New York Times bestseller has been updated with a new Afterword by Immaculée, in which she looks back at the 20 years that have passed since the Rwandan holocaust. You won’t want to miss her views on how life has changed for her and her country since this terrible event took place.

In The Name Of Humanity

Author: Max Wallace
Publisher: Skyhorse Publishing Inc.
ISBN: 1510734996
Size: 74.52 MB
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Shortlisted for the 2018 RBC Taylor prize for literary nonfiction “A riveting tale of the previously unknown and fascinating story of the unsung angels who strove to foil the Final Solution.”—Kirkus starred review On November 25, 1944, prisoners at Auschwitz heard a deafening explosion. Emerging from their barracks, they witnessed the crematoria and gas chambers--part of the largest killing machine in human history--come crashing down. Most assumed they had fallen victim to inmate sabotage and thousands silently cheered. However, the Final Solution's most efficient murder apparatus had not been felled by Jews, but rather by the ruthless architect of mass genocide, Reichsführer-SS Heinrich Himmler. It was an edict that has puzzled historians for more than six decades. Holocaust historian and New York Times bestselling author Max Wallace--a veteran interviewer for Steven Spielberg's Shoah Foundation--draws on an explosive cache of recently declassified documents and an account from the only living eyewitness to unravel the mystery. He uncovers an astounding story involving the secret negotiations of an unlikely trio--a former fascist President of Switzerland, a courageous Orthodox Jewish woman, and Himmler's Finnish osteopath--to end the Holocaust, aided by clandestine Swedish and American intelligence efforts. He documents their efforts to deceive Himmler, who, as Germany's defeat loomed, sought to enter an alliance with the West against the Soviet Union. By exploiting that fantasy and persuading Himmler to betray Hitler's orders, the group helped to prevent the liquidation of tens of thousands of Jews during the last months of the Second World War, and thwarted Hitler's plan to take "every last Jew" down with the Reich. Deeply researched and dramatically recounted, In the Name of Humanity is a remarkable tale of bravery and audacious tactics that will help rewrite the history of the Holocaust.

Survival In The Shadows

Author: Barbara Lovenheim
Publisher: Peter Owen Publishers
ISBN:
Size: 57.94 MB
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This work tells the story of seven hidden jews in Hitler's Berlin. Rather than risking so-called resettlement they found themselves living in a shadowy underworld where they had to survive without identity cards and ration books.

Mending Walls

Author: Richard A. Diem
Publisher: IAP
ISBN: 1681238330
Size: 13.10 MB
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This volume of the International Social Studies Forum offers papers presented at the 2016 Social Studies Education Forum International Conference that was held in Berlin, Germany in June, 2016. The authors are a cross section of international educators. The issues and research structures noted in the volume focus on how education can mend the walls dividing societies, both internally and externally, across the globe. Papers on understanding how to use democratic and civic education to off set differences in cultural perspectives to understanding how educational policy influences choice and activism are represented throughout.

My Brother S Voice

Author: Stephen Nasser
Publisher: Stephens Press, LLC
ISBN: 9781932173109
Size: 42.38 MB
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Stephen Nasser was 13 years old when the Nazi's sent he and his family to Auschwitz. Stephen tells his story in the direct and optimistic language of a young boy.

Invisible Jews

Author: Eddie Bielawski
Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
ISBN: 9781976075933
Size: 36.66 MB
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I was born in the town of Wegrow in north-eastern Poland in mid-1938. Not a propitious time and place for a Jewish child to be born. One memory that has been etched indelibly in my mind is the sight of the Nazi army marching toward Russia. Our house was located on the main road leading to the Russian frontier. Day and night they marched - soldiers, trucks, tanks, and more soldiers, in a never ending line - an invincible force. I remember my father, holding me in his arms, saying to my mother, "Who is going to stop them? Certainly not the Russians." One night, my father had a dream. In this dream he saw what he had to do: where to build the bunker, how to build it, and even its dimensions. He would build a bunker under a wooden storage shed behind the house. It would be covered with boards, on top of which would be placed soil and bits of straw which would render it invisible. In order to camouflage the entrance, he would construct a shallow box and fill it with earth and cover it with straw so that it would be indistinguishable from the rest of the earthen floor. Air would be supplied through a drain pipe buried in the earth. This was to be our Noah's Ark that would save us from the initial deluge. It took my father about three weeks to finish the job. When he was done, he took my mother and sister into the shed and asked them if they could find the trap door. When they could not, he was satisfied. My mother prepared dry biscuits, jars of jam made out of beets, some tinned goods such as sardines, some sugar and salt. We placed two buckets in the bunker. One bucket was filled with water, the other bucket was empty and would serve as the latrine. We also took down some blankets, a couple of pillows and some warm clothing. We were ready. For three long years, starting in 1941 when the Nazis started the deportations and mass killings, we hid in secret bunkers, dug in fields, under sheds and houses, or constructed in barns. It seems that the only way that a Jew could survive in wartime Poland was to become invisible. So we became invisible Jews.

God Faith Identity From The Ashes

Author: Menachem Z. Rosensaft
Publisher: Jewish Lights Publishing
ISBN: 158023805X
Size: 17.77 MB
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A Powerful, Life-Affirming New Perspective on the Holocaust Almost ninety children and grandchildren of Holocaust survivors—theologians, scholars, spiritual leaders, authors, artists, political and community leaders and media personalities—from sixteen countries on six continents reflect on how the memories transmitted to them have affected their lives. Profoundly personal stories explore faith, identity and legacy in the aftermath of the Holocaust as well as our role in ensuring that future genocides and similar atrocities never happen again. There have been many books and studies about children of Holocaust survivors—the so-called second and third generations—with a psycho-social focus. This book is different. It is intended to reflect what they believe, who they are and how that informs what they have done and are doing with their lives. From major religious or intellectual explorations to shorter commentaries on experiences, quandaries and cultural, political and personal affirmations, almost ninety contributors from sixteen countries respond to this question: how have your parents’ and grandparents’ experiences and examples helped shape your identity and your attitudes toward God, faith, Judaism, the Jewish people and the world as a whole? For people of all faiths and backgrounds, these powerful and deeply moving statements will have a profound effect on the way our and future generations understand and shape their understanding of the Holocaust. Praise from Pope Francis for Menachem Rosensaft’s essay reconciling God’s presence with the horrors of the Holocaust: “When you, with humility, are telling us where God was in that moment, I felt within me that you had transcended all possible explanations and that, after a long pilgrimage—sometimes sad, tedious or dull—you came to discover a certain logic and it is from there that you were speaking to us; the logic of First Kings 19:12, the logic of that ‘gentle breeze’ (I know that it is a very poor translation of the rich Hebrew expression) that constitutes the only possible hermeneutic interpretation. “Thank you from my heart. And, please, do not forget to pray for me. May the Lord bless you.” —His Holiness Pope Francis Contributors include: Justice Rosalie Silberman Abella of the Supreme Court of Canada Historian Ilya Altman, cofounder and cochairman, Russian Research and Educational Holocaust Center, Moscow New York Times reporter and author Joseph Berger, New York Historian Eleonora Bergman, former director, Jewish Historical Institute, Warsaw Vivian Glaser Bernstein, former cochief, Group Programmes Unit, United Nations Department of Public Information, New York Michael Brenner, professor of Jewish history and culture, Ludwig-Maximilians University of Munich; chair in Israel studies, American University, Washington, DC Novelist and poet Lily Brett, winner of the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize Award, New York New York Times deputy national news editor and former Jerusalem bureau chief Ethan Bronner, New York Stephanie Butnick, associate editor, Tablet Magazine, New York Rabbi Chaim Zev Citron, Ahavas Yisroel Synagogue and Yeshiva Ohr Elchonon Chabad, Los Angeles Dr. Stephen L. Comite, assistant clinical professor of dermatology, Mount Sinai Hospital, New York Elaine Culbertson, director of a program taking American high school teachers to study Holocaust sites, New York Former Israeli Minister of Internal Security and Shin Bet director Avi Dichter, Israel Lawrence S. Elbaum, attorney, New York Alexis Fishman, Australian actor and singer Shimon Koffler Fogel, CEO, Centre for Israel and Jewish Affairs, Ottawa Dr. Eva Fogelman, psychologist and author, New York Associate Judge Karen “Chaya” Friedman of the Circuit Court of Maryland Natalie Friedman, dean of studies and senior class dean, Barnard College, New York Michael W. Grunberger, director of collections, U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum, Washington, DC David Harris, executive director, American Jewish Committee, New York Author Eva Hoffman, recipient of the Jean Stein Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, London Rabbi Abie Ingber, executive director, Center for Interfaith Community Engagement, Xavier University, Cincinnati, OH Josef Joffe, editor-publisher, Die Zeit, Germany Rabbi Lody B. van de Kamp, author; former member of the Chief Rabbinate of Holland and the Conference of European Rabbis, Holland Rabbi Lilly Kaufman, Torah Fund director, The Jewish Theological Seminary of America, New York Filmmaker Aviva Kempner, Washington, DC Cardiologist Dr. David N. Kenigsberg, Plantation, FL Author and Shalom Hartman Institute fellow Yossi Klein Halevi, Israel Attorney Faina Kukliansky, chairperson, Jewish Community of Lithuania, Vilnius Rabbi Benny Lau, Ramban Synagogue, Jerusalem Amichai Lau-Lavie, founding director, Storahtelling, Israel/New York Philanthropist Jeanette Lerman- Neubauer, Philadelphia Hariete Levy, insurance actuary, Paris Annette Lévy-Willard, journalist and author, Paris Rabbi Mordechai Liebling, Reconstructionist Rabbinical College, Philadelphia Knesset member Rabbi Dov Lipman, Israel Rabbi Michael Marmur, provost, Hebrew Union College–Jewish Institute of Religion, Jerusalem International banker Julius Meinl, president, Euro-Asian Jewish Congress, Prague Knesset member and former journalist Merav Michaeli, Israel The Right Honourable David Miliband, former foreign secretary, United Kingdom; president, International Rescue Committee, New York Tali Nates, director, Johannesburg Holocaust and Genocide Centre, South Africa Eric Nelson, professor of government, Harvard University Eddy Neumann, esq., Sydney, Australia Mathew S. Nosanchuk, Director for Outreach, National Security Council, the White House, Washington, DC Artist and author Aliza Olmert, Jerusalem Couples therapist Esther Perel, New York Sylvia Posner, administrative executive to the Board of Governors, Hebrew Union College–Jewish Institute of Religion, New York Rabbi Joseph Potasnik, executive vice president, New York Board of Rabbis Dr. Richard Prasquier, past president, Conseil Représentatif des Institutions Juives de France (Representative Council of French Jewish Institutions), Paris Richard Primus, professor of law, University of Michigan Law School Professor Shulamit Reinharz, director, the Women’s Studies Research Center and the Hadassah-Brandeis Institute, Brandeis University, MA Chaim Reiss, CFO, World Jewish Congress Jochi (Jochevet) Ritz-Olewski, former vice dean of academic studies, The Open University of Israel Moshe Ronen, vice president, World Jewish Congress; former president, Canadian Jewish Congress, Toronto Novelist and Fordham University law professor Thane Rosenbaum, New York Rabbi Dr. Bernhard H. Rosenberg, Congregation Beth-El, Edison, NJ Art historian and museum director Jean Bloch Rosensaft, New York Menachem Z. Rosensaft, general counsel, World Jewish Congress and professor of law, New York Hannah Rosenthal, former U.S. State Department special envoy to monitor and combat anti-Semitism, Wisconsin Rabbi Judith Schindler, Temple Beth El, Charlotte, NC Clarence Schwab, equity investor, New York Cantor Azi Schwartz, Park Avenue Synagogue, New York Ghita Schwarz, senior attorney, Center for Constitutional Rights, New York Psychologist Dr. David Senesh, Tel Aviv Florence Shapiro, former mayor, Plano, Texas, and former state senator, Texas Rabbi Kinneret Shiryon, Kehillat YOZMA, Modi’in, Israel David Silberklang, senior historian, Yad Vashem, Israel Documentary film maker and author André Singer, London Peter Singer, professor of bioethics, Princeton University Robert Singer, CEO and executive vice president, World Jewish Congress Psychologist Dr. Yaffa Singer, Tel Aviv Sam Sokol, reporter, The Jerusalem Post, Israel Philanthropist Alexander Soros, New York Rabbi Elie Kaplan Spitz, Congregation B’nai Israel, Tustin, CA Michael Ashley Stein, executive director, Harvard Law School Project on Disability Rabbi Kenneth A. Stern, Congregation Gesher Shalom, Fort Lee, NJ Maram Stern, associate CEO for diplomacy, World Jewish Congress, Brussels Carol Kahn Strauss, international director, Leo Baeck Institute, New York Aviva Tal, lecturer in Yiddish literature, Bar Ilan University, Israel Professor Katrin Tenenbaum, scholar on modern Jewish culture and philosophical thought, University of Rome Dr. Mark L. Tykocinski, dean, Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia Rabbi Moshe Waldoks, Temple Beth Zion, Brookline, MA Psychologist Diana Wang, president, Generaciones de la Shoá en Argentina, Buenos Aires Author Ilana Weiser-Senesh, Tel Aviv Jeffrey S. Wiesenfeld, former senior aide to New York Governor George Pataki and U.S. Senator Alfonse D’Amato U.S. Senator Ron Wyden, Oregon Sociologist Tali Zelkowicz, Hebrew Union College–Jewish Institute of Religion, Los Angeles

The Last Lynching

Author: Anthony S. Pitch
Publisher: Skyhorse Publishing, Inc.
ISBN: 1510701761
Size: 24.83 MB
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Nothing casts a more sinister shadow over our nation’s history than the gruesome lynchings that happened between 1882 and 1937, claiming 4,680 victims. Often, in a show of racist violence, the lynchers tortured their victims before murdering them. Most killers were never brought to justice; some were instead celebrated as heroes, their victims’ bodies displayed, or even cut up and distributed, as trophies. Then, in 1946, the dead bodies of two men and two women were found near Moore’s Ford Bridge in rural Monroe, Georgia. Their killers were never identified. And although the crime reverberated through the troubled community, the corrupt courts, and eventually the whole world, many details remained unexplored – until now. In The Last Lynching, Anthony S. Pitch reveals the true story behind the last mass lynching in America in unprecedented detail. Drawing on some 10,000 previously classified documents from the FBI and National Archives, Lynched paints an unflinching picture of the lives of the victims, suspects, and eyewitnesses, and describes the political, judicial, and socioeconomic conditions that stood in the way of justice. Along the way, The Last Lynching sheds light into a dark corner of American history which no one can afford to ignore. Skyhorse Publishing, as well as our Arcade imprint, are proud to publish a broad range of books for readers interested in history--books about World War II, the Third Reich, Hitler and his henchmen, the JFK assassination, conspiracies, the American Civil War, the American Revolution, gladiators, Vikings, ancient Rome, medieval times, the old West, and much more. While not every title we publish becomes a New York Times bestseller or a national bestseller, we are committed to books on subjects that are sometimes overlooked and to authors whose work might not otherwise find a home.

Forgotten Victims

Author: Mitchel G Bard
Publisher: Westview Press
ISBN: 9780813330648
Size: 36.12 MB
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One common explanation for the world's failure to prevent the Holocaust is that the information about the Nazi extermination program seemed too incredible to believe. Fifty years later, Americans may now also find it difficult to believe that their fellow citizens were among the twelve million people murdered by the Nazis, abandoned to this fate by their own government.The outbreak of war in Europe put tens of thousands of American civilians, especially Jews, in deadly peril, but the State Department failed to help them. As a consequence of this callous policy many suffered—and some died. Later, when the United States joined the war against Hitler, many brave young Americans were captured and imprisoned. Jewish soldiers were at a special risk—they were sent into battle with a telltale “H” (for “Hebrew'') on their dog tags, which helped the Nazis single them out for mistreatment. One group of Jewish GIs was sent to the brutal Berga labor camp, which had the highest fatality rate of any POW facility. Other POWs were sent to concentration camps, where they became victims of the machinery of the “Final Solution.”Why is it that none of the hundreds of books about the Holocaust has examined the fate of Americans who fell into Nazi hands? Perhaps it is because the number of American victims was relatively small compared to the total that perished. Perhaps it is due to the perception of the Holocaust as a purely European phenomenon; most people assumed that Americans could not have become victims. But, according to Mitchell Bard, the main reason this story has gone untold for a half century is that much of the evidence has been concealed by our own government.The U.S. government had good reasons to cover up this story. The revelation that Americans were mistreated and that their government knew and failed to do anything about it would certainly raise uncomfortable questions about this country's failure to offer safe haven to the Nazis' main target: European Jews. Forgotten Victims provides documentary evidence proving that American officials knew that U.S. civilians and soldiers were in danger, that they were being mistreated (including being placed in concentration camps), and that they were even being murdered by the Nazis. The story of how European Jewry was forsaken by the Western Allies is by now familiar, but this book exposes for the first time the abandonment of American Jews.