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Pedagogy Of Commitment

Author: Paulo Freire
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317254465
Size: 79.28 MB
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This first English translation of Pedagogy of Commitment takes readers deep into the acts and meaning of living a life of community and social commitment. Paulo Friere discusses how, for teachers specifically, this commitment is not only to students, to the underprivileged, or to the education of those who speak a different language, but to the transformation of the self to become more deeply responsive to the needs of social transformations. More than any other Freire book, this speaks directly and plainly to the lives of individuals and to teachers. It is an inspiring and passionate call from a global giant of progressive education.

Critical Narrative As Pedagogy

Author: Ivor Goodson
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA
ISBN: 1623566894
Size: 14.82 MB
Format: PDF
View: 2015
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Ivor Goodson and Scherto Gill analyse and discuss a series of trans-disciplinary case studies from diverse cultures and argue that narrative is not only a rich and profound way for humans to make sense of their lives, but also in itself a process of pedagogical encounter, learning and transformation. As pedagogic sites, life narratives allow the individual to critically examine their 'scripts' for learning which are encapsulated in their thought processes, discourses, beliefs and values. Goodson and Gill show how narratives can help educators and students shift from a disenfranchised tradition to one of empowerment. This unique book brings together case studies of life narratives as an approach to learning and meaning-making in different disciplines and cultural settings, including teacher education, adult learning, (auto)biographical writing, psychotherapy, intercultural learning and community development. Educators, researchers and practitioners from diverse disciplines will find the case studies collected in this book helpful in expanding their understanding of the potential of narrative as a phenomenon, as methodology, and as pedagogy.

Critical Peace Education And Global Citizenship

Author: Rita Verma
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 1317233042
Size: 55.20 MB
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Critical Peace Education and Global Citizenship offers narrative accounts representing multiple ways teacher and learner activists have come to realize possibilities for peace and reconciliation through unofficial curricula. With these narratives, the book demonstrates the connections between critical peace education and such crucial issues as human trafficking, gang violence, contested narratives of nationhood and belonging, gender identities, and the significance of mentoring. Through rich examples of pedagogic work, this volume enhances and illustrates critically oriented understandings and interpretations of peace in real classrooms with diverse populations of students. Written primarily for scholars and graduate students working in the fields of educational theory, critical pedagogy, and educational policy, the chapters in this book tell a compelling story about teachers, learners and scholar activists who continue to struggle for the creation of transformative and meaningful sites for peace praxis.

International Teacher Education

Author: Lily Orland-Barak
Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing
ISBN: 178441669X
Size: 40.13 MB
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The book fills a gaping hole in the teacher education literature. Nowhere is there a volume that globally surveys teacher education pedagogies and invites international scholars to describe the most productive ones in their home countries.

Che Guevara Paulo Freire And The Pedagogy Of Revolution

Author: Peter McLaren
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 9780847695331
Size: 33.31 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Written by one of the world's most renowned critical educators, this book evaluates the message of Che Guevara and Paulo Freire for contemporary politics in general and education in particular.

Critical Pedagogy For Social Justice

Author: John Smyth
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA
ISBN: 1441127798
Size: 43.61 MB
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We live in a time when those who wield unrestrained power believe they have the inalienable right to determine the destiny, nature and shape of social institutions like schools. Critical Pedagogy for Social Justice challenges this arrogance by showing how teachers, students, parents, communities, and researchers can develop narratives that amount to working with and for those who are increasingly being silenced, marginalized and excluded. John Smyth sets out to revisit critical pedagogy from a number of key leverage points. The overarching aim of this book is to unmask the deforming and distorting way power operates, while at the same time revealing how a commitment to a more socially just world can exist in the everyday lives and narratives of people who have a passion for transformative possibilities. His clear, concise, and persuasive book is ideal for those who are dissatisfied with the current turn in education and who are seeking an alternative set of views that emerge from the grounded experiences and practices ion schools struggling with the most disadvantaged circumstances.

Critical Intercultural Communication Pedagogy

Author: Ahmet Atay
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 1498531210
Size: 24.35 MB
Format: PDF
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Critical Intercultural Communication Pedagogy constructs a theoretical frame through which critical intercultural communication pedagogy can be dreamed, envisioned, and realized as praxis. Its chapters provide answers to questions surrounding the relationship of intercultural communication pedagogy to critical race theory, queer theory, critical ethnography, and narrative methodology, among others. Utilizing a diverse array of theoretical and methodological approaches within critical intercultural communication research, this collection is creatively engaging, theoretically innovating, and pedagogically encouraging.

Critical Pedagogy

Author: Peter McLaren
Publisher: Peter Lang
ISBN: 9780820481470
Size: 61.63 MB
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Presents a collection of essays that focus on the topic of critical pedagoy and its response to the moral, economic, and social issues in the world.

Critical Pedagogy And Teacher Education In The Neoliberal Era

Author: Susan L. Groenke
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9781402095887
Size: 28.49 MB
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Susan L. Groenke and J. Amos Hatch It does not feel safe to be critical in university-based teacher education programs right now, especially if you are junior faculty. In the neoliberal era, critical teacher education research gets less and less funding, and professors can be denied tenure or lose their jobs for speaking out against the status quo. Also, we know that the pedagogies critical teacher educators espouse can get beginning K–12 teachers fired or shuffled around, especially if their students’ test scores are low. This, paired with the resistance many of the future teachers who come through our programs—predominantly White, middle-class, and happy with the current state of affairs—show toward critical pedagogy, makes it seem a whole lot easier, less risky, even smart not to “do” critical pedagogy at all. Why bother? We believe this book shows we have lots of reasons to “bother” with critical pe- gogy in teacher education, as current educational policies and the neoliberal discourses that vie for the identities of our own local contexts increasingly do not have education for the public good in mind. This book shows teacher educators taking risks, seeking out what political theorist James Scott has called the “small openings” for resistance in the contexts that mark teacher education in the early twenty-first century.

Hugging The Middle

Author: Larry Cuban
Publisher: Teachers College Pr
ISBN: 9780807749364
Size: 15.99 MB
Format: PDF
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Larry Cuban's How Teachers Taught has been widely acclaimed as a pathbreaking text on the history and evolution of classroom teaching. Now Cuban brings his great experience as a classroom teacher, superintendent, and researcher to this highly anticipated follow-up to his groundbreaking work. Focusing on three diverse school districts (Arlington, Virginia; Denver, Colorado; Oakland, California), Hugging the Middle offers an incisive portrayal of how teachers teach now. It is a revealing look at a range of current, workable pedagogical options educators are using to engage students while satisfying parents and policymakers-options that succeed by creating hybrid practices that combine both teacher-centered approaches (e.g., mostly direct instruction, textbooks, lectures) with student-centered ones (e.g., team projects on real-world problems, independent learning, small-groupwork). This book serves as a state-of-the-profession assessment in an era of top-down educational policy