Download policing immigrants local law enforcement on the front lines chicago series in law and society in pdf or read policing immigrants local law enforcement on the front lines chicago series in law and society in pdf online books in PDF, EPUB and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to get policing immigrants local law enforcement on the front lines chicago series in law and society in pdf book now. This site is like a library, Use search box in the widget to get ebook that you want.



Policing Immigrants

Author: Doris Marie Provine
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022636321X
Size: 44.35 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 4540
Download and Read
The United States deported nearly two million illegal immigrants during the first five years of the Obama presidency—more than during any previous administration. President Obama stands accused by activists of being “deporter in chief.” Yet despite efforts to rebuild what many see as a broken system, the president has not yet been able to convince Congress to pass new immigration legislation, and his record remains rooted in a political landscape that was created long before his election. Deportation numbers have actually been on the rise since 1996, when two federal statutes sought to delegate a portion of the responsibilities for immigration enforcement to local authorities. Policing Immigrants traces the transition of immigration enforcement from a traditionally federal power exercised primarily near the US borders to a patchwork system of local policing that extends throughout the country’s interior. Since federal authorities set local law enforcement to the task of bringing suspected illegal immigrants to the federal government’s attention, local responses have varied. While some localities have resisted the work, others have aggressively sought out unauthorized immigrants, often seeking to further their own objectives by putting their own stamp on immigration policing. Tellingly, how a community responds can best be predicted not by conditions like crime rates or the state of the local economy but rather by the level of conservatism among local voters. What has resulted, the authors argue, is a system that is neither just nor effective—one that threatens the core crime-fighting mission of policing by promoting racial profiling, creating fear in immigrant communities, and undermining the critical community-based function of local policing.

Working Law

Author: Lauren B. Edelman
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022640093X
Size: 35.10 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 1447
Download and Read
Since the passage of the Civil Rights Act, virtually all companies have antidiscrimination policies in place. Although these policies represent some progress, women and minorities remain underrepresented within the workplace as a whole and even more so when you look at high-level positions. They also tend to be less well paid. How is it that discrimination remains so prevalent in the American workplace despite the widespread adoption of policies designed to prevent it? One reason for the limited success of antidiscrimination policies, argues Lauren B. Edelman, is that the law regulating companies is broad and ambiguous, and managers therefore play a critical role in shaping what it means in daily practice. Often, what results are policies and procedures that are largely symbolic and fail to dispel long-standing patterns of discrimination. Even more troubling, these meanings of the law that evolve within companies tend to eventually make their way back into the legal domain, inconspicuously influencing lawyers for both plaintiffs and defendants and even judges. When courts look to the presence of antidiscrimination policies and personnel manuals to infer fair practices and to the presence of diversity training programs without examining whether these policies are effective in combating discrimination and achieving racial and gender diversity, they wind up condoning practices that deviate considerably from the legal ideals.

The Sit Ins

Author: Christopher W. Schmidt
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022652258X
Size: 56.15 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 6033
Download and Read
On February 1, 1960, four African American college students entered the Woolworth department store in Greensboro, North Carolina, and sat down at the lunch counter. This lunch counter, like most in the American South, refused to serve black customers. The four students remained in their seats until the store closed. In the following days, they returned, joined by growing numbers of fellow students. These “sit-in” demonstrations soon spread to other southern cities, drawing in thousands of students and coalescing into a protest movement that would transform the struggle for racial equality. The Sit-Ins tells the story of the student lunch counter protests and the national debate they sparked over the meaning of the constitutional right of all Americans to equal protection of the law. Christopher W. Schmidt describes how behind the now-iconic scenes of African American college students sitting in quiet defiance at “whites only” lunch counters lies a series of underappreciated legal dilemmas—about the meaning of the Constitution, the capacity of legal institutions to remedy different forms of injustice, and the relationship between legal reform and social change. The students’ actions initiated a national conversation over whether the Constitution’s equal protection clause extended to the activities of private businesses that served the general public. The courts, the traditional focal point for accounts of constitutional disputes, played an important but ultimately secondary role in this story. The great victory of the sit-in movement came not in the Supreme Court, but in Congress, with the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, landmark legislation that recognized the right African American students had claimed for themselves four years earlier. The Sit-Ins invites a broader understanding of how Americans contest and construct the meaning of their Constitution.

Islands Of Sovereignty

Author: Jeffrey S. Kahn
Publisher: Chicago Series in Law and Soci
ISBN: 022658741X
Size: 80.58 MB
Format: PDF
View: 6351
Download and Read
Introduction -- The political and the economic -- Border laboratories -- Contagion and the sovereign body -- Screening's architecture -- The jurisdictional imagination -- Interdiction adrift

Race Criminal Justice And Migration Control

Author: Mary Bosworth
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0192546538
Size: 61.39 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 4828
Download and Read
In an era of mass mobility, those who are permitted to migrate and those who are criminalized, controlled, and prohibited from migrating are heavily patterned by race. By placing race at the centre of its analysis, this volume brings together fourteen chapters that examine, question, and explain the growing intersection between criminal justice and migration control. Through the lens of race, we see how criminal justice and migration enmesh in order to exclude, stop, and excise racialized citizens and non-citizens from societies across the world within, beyond, and along borders. Neatly organized in four parts, the book begins with chapters that present a conceptual analysis of race, borders, and social control, moving to the institutions that make up and shape the criminal justice and migration complex. The remaining chapters are convened around the key sites where criminal justice and migration control intersect: policing, courts, and punishment. Together the volume presents a critical and timely analysis of how race shapes and complicates mobility and how racism is enabled and reanimated when criminal justice and migration control coalesce. Race and the meaning of race in relation to citizenship and belonging is excavated throughout the chapters presented in the book, thereby transforming the way we think about migration.

The New Jim Crow

Author: Michelle Alexander
Publisher: Antje Kunstmann
ISBN: 3956141598
Size: 70.56 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 2768
Download and Read
Die Wahl von Barack Obama im November 2008 markierte einen historischen Wendepunkt in den USA: Der erste schwarze Präsident schien für eine postrassistische Gesellschaft und den Triumph der Bürgerrechtsbewegung zu stehen. Doch die Realität in den USA ist eine andere. Obwohl die Rassentrennung, die in den sogenannten Jim-Crow-Gesetzen festgeschrieben war, im Zuge der Bürgerrechtsbewegung abgeschafft wurde, sitzt heute ein unfassbar hoher Anteil der schwarzen Bevölkerung im Gefängnis oder ist lebenslang als kriminell gebrandmarkt. Ein Status, der die Leute zu Bürgern zweiter Klasse macht, indem er sie ihrer grundsätzlichsten Rechte beraubt – ganz ähnlich den explizit rassistischen Diskriminierungen der Jim-Crow-Ära. In ihrem Buch, das in Amerika eine breite Debatte ausgelöst hat, argumentiert Michelle Alexander, dass die USA ihr rassistisches System nach der Bürgerrechtsbewegung nicht abgeschafft, sondern lediglich umgestaltet haben. Da unter dem perfiden Deckmantel des »War on Drugs« überproportional junge männliche Schwarze und ihre Communities kriminalisiert werden, funktioniert das drakonische Strafjustizsystem der USA heute wie das System rassistischer Kontrolle von gestern: ein neues Jim Crow.

Die Industrielle Gesellschaft Und Ihre Zukunft

Author: Theodore Kaczynski
Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
ISBN: 9781721022458
Size: 62.16 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 7685
Download and Read
Industrial Society and Its Future / The Unabomber Manifesto (2010) in deutscher Sprache. "1. Die industrielle Revolution und ihre Folgen waren ein Desaster für das menschliche Geschlecht. Sie haben die Lebenserwartung derjenigen von uns, die in "fortschrittlichen" Ländern leben, stark erhöht, aber sie haben die Gesellschaft destabilisiert, haben das Leben unerfüllt gemacht, Menschen Demütigungen unterworfen, zu weit verbreiteten psychischem Leiden geführt (in der Dritten Welt ebenso zu physischem Leiden) und haben der Natur einen schweren Schaden zugefügt. Die fortschreitende Entwicklung der Technologie wird die Situation verschlechtern. Sie wird den Menschen sicherlich größeren Demütigungen unterwerfen und der natürlichen Welt größeren Schaden zufügen, sie wird wahrscheinlich zu größeren sozialen Störungen und psychischen Leiden führen und sie dürfte sogar in "fortschrittlichen" Ländern zu erhöhtem körperlichen Leiden führen."