Download possessing the pacific land settlers and indigenous people from australia to alaska in pdf or read possessing the pacific land settlers and indigenous people from australia to alaska in pdf online books in PDF, EPUB and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to get possessing the pacific land settlers and indigenous people from australia to alaska in pdf book now. This site is like a library, Use search box in the widget to get ebook that you want.



Pacific Histories

Author: David Armitage
Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education
ISBN: 113700164X
Size: 58.29 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 1935
Download and Read
The first comprehensive account to place the Pacific Islands, the Pacific Rim and the Pacific Ocean into the perspective of world history. A highly distinguished international team of historians provides a chronological and thematic exploration of the Pacific, its inhabitants and the lands within and around it over 50,000 years.

The Routledge History Of Western Empires

Author: Robert Aldrich
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317999878
Size: 30.29 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 7646
Download and Read
The Routledge History of Western Empires is an all new volume focusing on the history of Western Empires in a comparative and thematic perspective. Comprising of thirty-three original chapters arranged in eight thematic sections, the book explores European overseas expansion from the Age of Discovery to the Age of Decolonisation. Studies by both well-known historians and new scholars offer fresh, accessible perspectives on a multitude of themes ranging from colonialism in the Arctic to the scramble for the coral sea, from attitudes to the environment in the East Indies to plans for colonial settlement in Australasia. Chapters examine colonial attitudes towards poisonous animals and the history of colonial medicine, evangelisaton in Africa and Oceania, colonial recreation in the tropics and the tragedy of the slave trade. The Routledge History of Western Empires ranges over five centuries and crosses continents and oceans highlighting transnational and cross-cultural links in the imperial world and underscoring connections between colonial history and world history. Through lively and engaging case studies, contributors not only weigh in on historiographical debates on themes such as human rights, religion and empire, and the ‘taproots’ of imperialism, but also illustrate the various approaches to the writing of colonial history. A vital contribution to the field.

Emptied Lands

Author: Alexandre Kedar
Publisher: Stanford University Press
ISBN: 1503604586
Size: 54.33 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 957
Download and Read
Emptied Landsinvestigates the protracted legal, planning, and territorial conflict between the settler Israeli state and indigenous Bedouin citizens over traditional lands in southern Israel/Palestine. The authors place this dispute in historical, legal, geographical, and international-comparative perspectives, providing the first legal geographic analysis of the "dead Negev doctrine" used by Israel to dispossess and forcefully displace Bedouin inhabitants in order to Judaize the region. The authors reveal that through manipulative use of Ottoman, British and Israeli laws, the state has constructed its own version ofterra nullius. Yet, the indigenous property and settlement system still functions, creating an ongoing resistance to the Jewish state.Emptied Landscritically examines several key land claims, court rulings, planning policies and development strategies, offering alternative local, regional, and international routes for justice.

Settler Sovereignty

Author: Lisa Ford
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674035652
Size: 36.23 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 3927
Download and Read
In a brilliant comparative study of law and imperialism, Lisa Ford argues that modern settler sovereignty emerged when settlers in North America and Australia defined indigenous theft and violence as crime. This occurred, not at the moment of settlement or federation, but in the second quarter of the nineteenth century when notions of statehood, sovereignty, empire, and civilization were in rapid, global flux. Ford traces the emergence of modern settler sovereignty in everyday contests between settlers and indigenous people in early national Georgia and the colony of New South Wales. In both places before 1820, most settlers and indigenous people understood their conflicts as war, resolved disputes with diplomacy, and relied on shared notions like reciprocity and retaliation to address frontier theft and violence. This legal pluralism, however, was under stress as new, global statecraft linked sovereignty to the exercise of perfect territorial jurisdiction. In Georgia, New South Wales, and elsewhere, settler sovereignty emerged when, at the same time in history, settlers rejected legal pluralism and moved to control or remove indigenous peoples.

Discovering Indigenous Lands

Author: Robert J. Miller
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199579814
Size: 65.81 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 3777
Download and Read
North America, New Zealand and Australia were colonised by England under an international legal principle that is known today as the doctrine of discovery. This book analyses how England applied this doctrine to gain control over the lands, property, government, and human rights of the indigenous peoples, and how this control continues to this day.

Decolonisation And The Pacific

Author: Tracey Banivanua Mar
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1316683982
Size: 74.52 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 441
Download and Read
This book charts the previously untold story of decolonisation in the oceanic world of the Pacific, Australia and New Zealand, presenting it both as an indigenous and an international phenomenon. Tracey Banivanua Mar reveals how the inherent limits of decolonisation were laid bare by the historical peculiarities of colonialism in the region, and demonstrates the way imperial powers conceived of decolonisation as a new form of imperialism. She shows how Indigenous peoples responded to these limits by developing rich intellectual, political and cultural networks transcending colonial and national borders, with localised traditions of protest and dialogue connected to the global ferment of the twentieth century. The individual stories told here shed new light on the forces that shaped twentieth-century global history, and reconfigure the history of decolonisation, presenting it not as an historic event, but as a fragile, contingent and ongoing process continuing well into the postcolonial era.

Empire By Treaty

Author: Saliha Belmessous
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199391807
Size: 21.33 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 2600
Download and Read
Most histories of European appropriation of indigenous territories have, until recently, focused on conquest and occupation, while relatively little attention has been paid to the history of treaty-making. Yet treaties were also a means of extending empire. To grasp the extent of European legal engagement with indigenous peoples, Empire by Treaty: Negotiating European Expansion, 1600-1900 looks at the history of treaty-making in European empires (Dutch, Spanish, Portuguese, French and British) from the early 17th to the late 19th century, that is, during both stages of European imperialism. While scholars have often dismissed treaties assuming that they would have been fraudulent or unequal, this book argues that there was more to the practice of treaty-making than mere commercial and political opportunism. Indeed, treaty-making was also promoted by Europeans as a more legitimate means of appropriating indigenous sovereignties and acquiring land than were conquest or occupation, and therefore as a way to reconcile expansion with moral and juridical legitimacy. As for indigenous peoples, they engaged in treaty-making as a way to further their interests even if, on the whole, they gained far less than the Europeans from those agreements and often less than they bargained for. The vexed history of treaty-making presents particular challenges for the great expectations placed in treaties for the resolution of conflicts over indigenous rights in post-colonial societies. These hopes are held by both indigenous peoples and representatives of the post-colonial state and yet, both must come to terms with the complex and troubled history of treaty-making over 300 years of empire. Empire by Treaty looks at treaty-making in Dutch colonial expansion, the Spanish-Portuguese border in the Americas, aboriginal land in Canada, French colonial West Africa, and British India.

Russian Colonization Of Alaska

Author: Andrei Val’terovich Grinëv
Publisher: University of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 1496207629
Size: 79.70 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 7625
Download and Read
In Russian Colonization of Alaska, Andrei Val’terovich Grinëv examines the sociohistorical origins of the former Russian colonies in Alaska, or “Russian America,” between 1741 and 1799. Beginning with the Second Kamchatka Expedition of Vitus Ivanovich Bering and Aleksei Ilyich Chirikov’s discovery of Alaska and the Aleutian Islands and ending with the formation of the Russian-American Company’s monopoly of the Russian colonial endeavor in the Americas, Russian Colonization of Alaskaoffers a definitive, revisionist examination of Tsarist Russia’s foray into the imperial contest in North America. Russian Colonization of Alaska is the first comprehensive study to analyze the origin and evolution of Russian colonization based on research into political economy, history, and ethnography. Grinёv’s study elaborates the social, political, spiritual, ideological, personal, and psychological aspects of Russian America. He also accounts for the idiosyncrasies of the natural environment, competition from other North American empires, Alaska Natives, and individual colonial diplomats. The colonization of Alaska, rather than being simply a continuation of the colonization of Siberia by Russians, was instead part of overarching Russian and global history.

Native American Whalemen And The World

Author: Nancy Shoemaker
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469622580
Size: 66.91 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 2863
Download and Read
In the nineteenth century, nearly all Native American men living along the southern New England coast made their living traveling the world's oceans on whaleships. Many were career whalemen, spending twenty years or more at sea. Their labor invigorated economically depressed reservations with vital income and led to complex and surprising connections with other Indigenous peoples, from the islands of the Pacific to the Arctic Ocean. At home, aboard ship, or around the world, Native American seafarers found themselves in a variety of situations, each with distinct racial expectations about who was "Indian" and how "Indians" behaved. Treated by their white neighbors as degraded dependents incapable of taking care of themselves, Native New Englanders nevertheless rose to positions of command at sea. They thereby complicated myths of exploration and expansion that depicted cultural encounters as the meeting of two peoples, whites and Indians. Highlighting the shifting racial ideologies that shaped the lives of these whalemen, Nancy Shoemaker shows how the category of "Indian" was as fluid as the whalemen were mobile.