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Postmortem

Author: Stefan Timmermans
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226803996
Size: 69.99 MB
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As elected coroners were replaced by medical examiners with scientific training, the American public became fascinated with their work. From the grisly investigations showcased on highly rated television shows like CSI to the bestselling mysteries that revolve around forensic science, medical examiners have never been so visible—or compelling. They, and they alone, solve the riddle of suspicious death and the existential questions that come with it. Why did someone die? Could it have been prevented? Should someone be held accountable? What are the implications of ruling a death a suicide, a homicide, or an accident? Can medical examiners unmask the perfect crime? Postmortem goes deep inside the world of medical examiners to uncover the intricate web of social, legal, and moral issues in which they operate. Stefan Timmermans spent years in a medical examiner's office following cases, interviewing examiners, and watching autopsies. While he relates fascinating cases here, he is also more broadly interested in the cultural authority and responsibilities that come with being a medical examiner. How medical examiners speak to the living on behalf of the dead is Timmermans's subject, revealed here in the day-to-day lives of the examiners themselves. “Postmortem is a wake-up call to forensic pathology. . . .This book should be viewed as provocative, rather than threatening, and should be a stimulus for important discussions and action by the forensic pathology community.”—Journal of the American Medical Association

Sudden Death And The Myth Of Cpr

Author: Stefan Timmermans
Publisher: Temple University Press
ISBN: 9781439905135
Size: 57.70 MB
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Sudden Death and the Myth of CPR is for anyone who has taken a CPR course or who believes the images from television dramas. It is also for families of victims and survivors of CPR. It will engage emergency personnel, others in the medical field, and anyone concerned with ethical issues of death and dying. Anyone who has ever taken a CPR course has wondered, "What would happen if I actually had to use CPR?" In Western societies, the lifesaving power of resuscitation has the status of a revered cultural myth. It promises life in the face of sudden death, but the reality is that lives are rarely saved. Medical researchers estimate the survival rate for out-of-hospital CPR to be between 1 and 3 percent. Sudden Death and the Myth of CPR explores the history of this medical innovation and the promotion of its effectiveness. The overuse of resuscitation, Timmermans explains, defines people's experience with sudden death, something he learned firsthand by following the practice of lifesaving from street corner to emergency room. He argues that very few people are successfully resuscitated without brain damage despite the promotion of CPR's effectiveness through powerful media images. In vivid accounts of the day-to-day practices of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in one of the only studies o f sudden death, Timmermans records the astonishingly frank comments of emergency personnel. Doctors, nurses, social workers, and paramedics express emotions from cynicism about going through the futile motions to genuine concern for victims' family members. If a person who was supposed to keep on living dies at the end of a resuscitative attempt, how socially meaningful is the dying? Timmermans asks tough questions and addresses the controversial ethical issues about the appropriateness of interfering with life and death. He suggests policy reform and the restoration of dignity to sudden death.

Death Investigation In America

Author: Jeffrey M Jentzen
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674054067
Size: 52.49 MB
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Why is the American system of death investigation so inconsistent and inadequate? In this unique political and cultural history, Jeffrey Jentzen draws on archives, interviews, and his own career as a medical examiner to look at the way that a long-standing professional and political rivalry controls public medical knowledge and public health.

Saving Babies

Author: Stefan Timmermans
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226924998
Size: 64.34 MB
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It has been close to six decades since Watson and Crick discovered the structure of DNA and more than ten years since the human genome was decoded. Today, through the collection and analysis of a small blood sample, every baby born in the United States is screened for more than fifty genetic disorders. Though the early detection of these abnormalities can potentially save lives, the test also has a high percentage of false positives—inaccurate results that can take a brutal emotional toll on parents before they are corrected. Now some doctors are questioning whether the benefits of these screenings outweigh the stress and pain they sometimes produce. In Saving Babies?, Stefan Timmermans and Mara Buchbinder evaluate the consequences and benefits of state-mandated newborn screening—and the larger policy questions they raise about the inherent inequalities in American medical care that limit the effectiveness of this potentially lifesaving technology. Drawing on observations and interviews with families, doctors, and policy actors, Timmermans and Buchbinder have given us the first ethnographic study of how parents and geneticists resolve the many uncertainties in screening newborns. Ideal for scholars of medicine, public health, and public policy, this book is destined to become a classic in its field.

An Introduction To The Work Of A Medical Examiner

Author: John J. Miletich
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 0275995089
Size: 46.42 MB
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Takes readers into the fascinating world of the medical examiner, who must determine cause of death, and explains the systems and tools used to determine if death was natural, accidental, suicide or murder.

History Of Forensic Medicine

Author: Burkhard Madea
Publisher: Lehmanns Media
ISBN: 386541205X
Size: 59.19 MB
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Forensic Medicine is an old medical discipline defined as “that science, which teaches the application of every branch of medical knowledge to the purpose of the law” (Alfred Swaine Taylor). Forensic Medicine deals with medical evidence not only in practice but also in research and furthermore all legal essentials in health care especially for doctors are part of teaching, training and research. Several steps in the development of Forensic Medicine can be distinguished: At first the use of medical knowledge for legal and public purposes.Secondly the compulsory medical testimony for the guidance of judges.Thirdly the professionalization as an own academic discipline. The development and existence of a speciality of Forensic Medicine depends essentially on two factors: on a sufficiently high development of the law and on a sufficiently high development of medicine. The period of professionalization of Forensic Medicine as an own academic discipline started in the 19th century, especially in Paris, Vienna, London, Edin­burgh, Berlin. Since than the world has changed dramatically and we are now witnesses of a rapid, deep-rooted social cultural, legal and technological trans­formation. Already 40 years ago Professor Bernhard Knight wrote in a survey on legal medicine in Europe: “In all aspects of life, the exchange of information on an inter­national level can do nothing but good and legal medicine is no exception.” This book on the History of Forensic Medicine is an approach in this direction. Forensic Medicine has a long and rich tradition since medical expertise has to face legal ques­tions and new questions and developments raised by the society. The aim of this book is to address the state of Forensic Medicine in different coun­tries worldwide. With contributions from Europe, China, Japan, the United States and the United Arabic Emirates.

Stigma

Author: Erving Goffman
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 9781439188330
Size: 23.62 MB
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From the author of The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life, Stigma is analyzes a person’s feelings about himself and his relationship to people whom society calls “normal.” Stigma is an illuminating excursion into the situation of persons who are unable to conform to standards that society calls normal. Disqualified from full social acceptance, they are stigmatized individuals. Physically deformed people, ex-mental patients, drug addicts, prostitutes, or those ostracized for other reasons must constantly strive to adjust to their precarious social identities. Their image of themselves must daily confront and be affronted by the image which others reflect back to them. Drawing extensively on autobiographies and case studies, sociologist Erving Goffman analyzes the stigmatized person’s feelings about himself and his relationship to “normals” He explores the variety of strategies stigmatized individuals employ to deal with the rejection of others, and the complex sorts of information about themselves they project. In Stigma the interplay of alternatives the stigmatized individual must face every day is brilliantly examined by one of America’s leading social analysts.

Saving Babies

Author: Stefan Timmermans
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226924998
Size: 70.72 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 4972
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It has been close to six decades since Watson and Crick discovered the structure of DNA and more than ten years since the human genome was decoded. Today, through the collection and analysis of a small blood sample, every baby born in the United States is screened for more than fifty genetic disorders. Though the early detection of these abnormalities can potentially save lives, the test also has a high percentage of false positives—inaccurate results that can take a brutal emotional toll on parents before they are corrected. Now some doctors are questioning whether the benefits of these screenings outweigh the stress and pain they sometimes produce. In Saving Babies?, Stefan Timmermans and Mara Buchbinder evaluate the consequences and benefits of state-mandated newborn screening—and the larger policy questions they raise about the inherent inequalities in American medical care that limit the effectiveness of this potentially lifesaving technology. Drawing on observations and interviews with families, doctors, and policy actors, Timmermans and Buchbinder have given us the first ethnographic study of how parents and geneticists resolve the many uncertainties in screening newborns. Ideal for scholars of medicine, public health, and public policy, this book is destined to become a classic in its field.