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Privacy Rights

Author: Alice Fleetwood Bartee
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 9780742553200
Size: 16.77 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Privacy Rights: Cases Lost and Causes Won Before the Supreme Court is a unique and timely study of the judicial process as it confronts four privacy issues: birth control, gay rights, abortion, and the right to die. The moral questions surrounding these subjects create intense and enduring debates about the scope and limits of the right to privacy. In four historic cases the right to privacy was struck down by the Supreme Court; in four later cases these rulings were overturned. Why? This book explains the original failure by analyzing attorneys' mistakes, miscommunication in the judicial conference, attitudes and policy predilections of the justices, and the negative attitudes of state officials and interest groups. The ultimate win for privacy rights is an exciting story involving well-known cases like Lawrence v. Texas, Planned Parenthood v. Casey, Griswold v. Connecticut, and the case of Terri Schiavo. Through the personal and legal details of these dramatic stories, the debate on privacy rights comes alive.

Privacy

Author: Jon L Mills
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 019971021X
Size: 27.27 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 2390
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The disturbing reality of contemporary life is that technology has laid bare the private facts of most people's lives. Email, cell phone calls, and individual purchasing habits are no longer secret. Individuals may be discussed on a blog, victimized by an inaccurate credit report, or have their email read by an employer or government agency without their knowledge. Government policy, mass media, and modern technology pose new challenges to privacy rights, while the law struggles to keep up with the rapid changes. Privacy: The Lost Right evaluates the status of citizens' right to privacy in today's intrusive world. Mills reviews the history of privacy protections, the general loss of privacy, and the inadequacy of current legal remedies, especially with respect to more recent privacy concerns, such as identity theft, government surveillance, tabloid journalism, and video surveillance in public places. Mills concludes that existing regulations do not adequately protect individual privacy, and he presents options for improving privacy protections.

Encyclopedia Of Privacy A M

Author: William G. Staples
Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group
ISBN: 9780313334788
Size: 70.16 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 485
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Writing in their famous Harvard Law Review article of 1890, Louis Brandeis and Samuel Warren asserted what many have considered one of the most cherished American values: the "right to be let alone." Yet in this post-9/11 world, it seems that personal privacy is under siege. New threats to privacy have arisen in the face of competing social, political, and economic demands, rapid technological change, and an intrusive and voyeuristic mass media. Citizens are barraged on a daily basis with stories of corporate data mining, government surveillance programs, identity theft, and computer hacking of personal information. As a result, citizens are becoming increasingly concerned about their personal privacy as well as their privacy rights. This encyclopedia, the first of its kind, comprehensively overviews various aspects of privacy throughout U.S. history, including significant legal cases, events, laws, organizations, individuals, technology, and terms. With some 225 alphabetically arranged entries written by more than 100 leading scholars and experts in the field, this inclusive and authoritative work will appeal to those interested in both historical and contemporary notions of privacy in the United States. Readers will learn of the significance of technology in today's society, its helpful and harmful effects on citizens' privacy, and what to expect in the future. Entries Include: BL Abortion BL Anti-Wire Tap Statutes BL Biometric Identifiers BL Carnivore BL COINTELPRO BL Data Brokers BL DNA and DNA Banking BL Freedom of Information Act BL Global Positioning Satellites BL Identity Fraud BL Library Records BL National Identification Card BL Open Meeting Laws BL Privacy Torts BL Right to Be Let Alone BL Search Warrant BL Social Security Number BL Telecommunications Act of 1996 BL Telemarketing BL United States Postal Service BL USA Patriot Act BL Workplace Privacy BL And Many More. Entries cite print and electronic resources, and the Encyclopedia closes with a listing of books, organizations, websites, films, and other sources of information. FEATURES AND BENEFITS: BL Includes some 225 alphabetically arranged entries written by more than 100 expert contributors. BL Cites print and electronic resources for student research. BL Covers a broad range of legal, political, social, and economic issues. BL Focuses on current concerns. BL Supports the social studies curriculum by helping students understand the evolution of the right to privacy, the threats to privacy in contemporary America, and the ethical issues surrounding technology in the modern world.

Encyclopedia Of Privacy N Z

Author: William G. Staples
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780313334795
Size: 12.31 MB
Format: PDF
View: 1582
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Writing in their famous Harvard Law Review article of 1890, Louis Brandeis and Samuel Warren asserted what many have considered one of the most cherished American values: the "right to be let alone." Yet in this post-9/11 world, it seems that personal privacy is under siege. New threats to privacy have arisen in the face of competing social, political, and economic demands, rapid technological change, and an intrusive and voyeuristic mass media. Citizens are barraged on a daily basis with stories of corporate data mining, government surveillance programs, identity theft, and computer hacking of personal information. As a result, citizens are becoming increasingly concerned about their personal privacy as well as their privacy rights. This encyclopedia, the first of its kind, comprehensively overviews various aspects of privacy throughout U.S. history, including significant legal cases, events, laws, organizations, individuals, technology, and terms. With some 225 alphabetically arranged entries written by more than 100 leading scholars and experts in the field, this work will appeal to those interested in both historical and contemporary notions of privacy in the United States. Readers will learn of the significance of technology in today's society, its helpful and harmful effects on citizens' privacy, and what to expect in the future. Entries Include: Abortion, Anti-Wire Tap Statutes, Biometric Identifiers, Carnivore, Data Brokers, DNA and DNA Banking, Freedom of Information Act, Global Positioning Satellites, Identity Fraud, Library Records, National Identification Card, Open Meeting Laws, Privacy Torts, Right to Be Let Alone, Search Warrant, Social Security Number, Telecommunications Act of 1996, Telemarketing, United States Postal Service, USA Patriot Act, Workplace Privacy, and many more. Entries cite print and electronic resources, and the Encyclopedia closes with a listing of books, organizations, websites, films, and other sources of information. Supports the social studies curriculum by helping students understand the evolution of the right to privacy, the threats to privacy in contemporary America, and the ethical issues surrounding technology in the modern world.

We The Corporations How American Businesses Won Their Civil Rights

Author: Adam Winkler
Publisher: Liveright Publishing
ISBN: 0871403846
Size: 19.39 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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We the Corporations chronicles the revelatory story of one of the most successful, yet least known, “civil rights movements” in American history. We the Corporations chronicles the astonishing story of one of the most successful yet least well-known “civil rights movements” in American history. Hardly oppressed like women and minorities, business corporations, too, have fought since the nation’s earliest days to gain equal rights under the Constitution—and today have nearly all the same rights as ordinary people. Exposing the historical origins of Citizens United and Hobby Lobby, Adam Winkler explains how those controversial Supreme Court decisions extending free speech and religious liberty to corporations were the capstone of a centuries-long struggle over corporate personhood and constitutional protections for business. Beginning his account in the colonial era, Winkler reveals the profound influence corporations had on the birth of democracy and on the shape of the Constitution itself. Once the Constitution was ratified, corporations quickly sought to gain the rights it guaranteed. The first Supreme Court case on the rights of corporations was decided in 1809, a half-century before the first comparable cases on the rights of African Americans or women. Ever since, corporations have waged a persistent and remarkably fruitful campaign to win an ever-greater share of individual rights. Although corporations never marched on Washington, they employed many of the same strategies of more familiar civil rights struggles: civil disobedience, test cases, and novel legal claims made in a purposeful effort to reshape the law. Indeed, corporations have often been unheralded innovators in constitutional law, and several of the individual rights Americans hold most dear were first secured in lawsuits brought by businesses. Winkler enlivens his narrative with a flair for storytelling and a colorful cast of characters: among others, Daniel Webster, America’s greatest advocate, who argued some of the earliest corporate rights cases on behalf of his business clients; Roger Taney, the reviled Chief Justice, who surprisingly fought to limit protections for corporations—in part to protect slavery; and Roscoe Conkling, a renowned politician who deceived the Supreme Court in a brazen effort to win for corporations the rights added to the Constitution for the freed slaves. Alexander Hamilton, Teddy Roosevelt, Huey Long, Ralph Nader, Louis Brandeis, and even Thurgood Marshall all played starring roles in the story of the corporate rights movement. In this heated political age, nothing can be timelier than Winkler’s tour de force, which shows how America’s most powerful corporations won our most fundamental rights and turned the Constitution into a weapon to impede the regulation of big business.

Dissent And The Supreme Court

Author: Melvin I. Urofsky
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 030774132X
Size: 77.76 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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In his major work, acclaimed historian and judicial authority Melvin Urofsky examines the great dissents throughout the Court's long history. Constitutional dialogue is one of the ways in which we as a people reinvent and reinvigorate our democratic society. The Supreme Court has interpreted the meaning of the Constitution, acknowledged that the Court's majority opinions have not always been right, and initiated a critical discourse about what a particular decision should mean and fashioning subsequent decisions--largely through the power of dissent. Urofsky shows how the practice grew slowly but steadily, beginning with the infamous & now overturned case of Dred Scott v. Sanford (1857) during which Chief Justice Roger Taney's opinion upheld slaver and ending with the present age of incivility, in which reasoned dialogue seems less and less possible. Dissent on the court and off, Urofsky argues in this major work, has been a crucial ingredient in keeping the Constitution alive and must continue to be so.