Download psychology and environmental change in pdf or read psychology and environmental change in pdf online books in PDF, EPUB and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to get psychology and environmental change in pdf book now. This site is like a library, Use search box in the widget to get ebook that you want.



Psychology And Environmental Change

Author: Raymond S. Nickerson
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 113563890X
Size: 31.11 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 878
Download and Read
This book stimulates thinking on the topic of detrimental environmental change and how research psychologists can help to address the problem. In addition to reporting environmentally relevant psychological research, the author identifies the most pressing questions from an environmental point of view. Psychology and Environmental Change: *focuses on ways in which human behavior contributes to the problem; *deals with the assessment and change of attitudes and with studies of change of behavior; *proposes ways in which psychological research can contribute to making technology and its products more environmentally benign; and *introduces topics such as consumption, risk assessment, cost-benefit and tradeoff analyses, competition, negotiation, and policymaking, and how they relate to the objective of protecting the environment.

Psychology And Climate Change

Author: Susan Clayton
Publisher: Academic Press
ISBN: 0128131314
Size: 57.56 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 2127
Download and Read
Psychology and Climate Change: Human Perceptions, Impacts, and Responses organizes and summarizes recent psychological research that relates to the issue of climate change. The book covers topics such as how people perceive and respond to climate change, how people understand and communicate about the issue, how it impacts individuals and communities, particularly vulnerable communities, and how individuals and communities can best prepare for and mitigate negative climate change impacts. It addresses the topic at multiple scales, from individuals to close social networks and communities. Further, it considers the role of social diversity in shaping vulnerability and reactions to climate change. Psychology and Climate Change describes the implications of psychological processes such as perceptions and motivations (e.g., risk perception, motivated cognition, denial), emotional responses, group identities, mental health and well-being, sense of place, and behavior (mitigation and adaptation). The book strives to engage diverse stakeholders, from multiple disciplines in addition to psychology, and at every level of decision making - individual, community, national, and international, to understand the ways in which human capabilities and tendencies can and should shape policy and action to address the urgent and very real issue of climate change. Examines the role of knowledge, norms, experience, and social context in climate change awareness and action Considers the role of identity threat, identity-based motivation, and belonging Presents a conceptual framework for classifying individual and household behavior Develops a model to explain environmentally sustainable behavior Draws on what we know about participation in collective action Describes ways to improve the effectiveness of climate change communication efforts Discusses the difference between acute climate change events and slowly-emerging changes on our mental health Addresses psychological stress and injury related to global climate change from an intersectional justice perspective Promotes individual and community resilience

The Psychology Of Climate Change

Author: Geoff Beattie
Publisher: Psychology of Everything
ISBN: 9781138484511
Size: 12.65 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 7489
Download and Read
What explains our attitudes towards the environment? Why do so many climate change initiatives fail? How can we do more to prevent humans damaging the environment? The Psychology of Climate Changeexplores the evidence for our changing environment, and suggests there is a significant cognitive bias in how we think about, and act on climate change. The authors examine how organisations have attempted to mobilise the public in the fight against climate change, but have often failed due to an unwillingness to adapt our individual behaviours, which must be challenged. They also explore why some people deny climate change altogether, and the influence they can have on others. By analysing our attitudes to the environment, The Psychology of Climate Change shows that we must think differently about climate change to protect our planet from further harm.

Don T Even Think About It

Author: George Marshall
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA
ISBN: 163286102X
Size: 42.91 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 5325
Download and Read
The director of the Climate Outreach and Information Network explores the psychological mechanism that enables people to ignore the dangers of climate change, using sidebars, cartoons and engaging stories from his years of research to reveal how humans are wired to primarily respond to visible threats.

Climate Change And Human Well Being

Author: Inka Weissbecker
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9781441997425
Size: 43.43 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 5566
Download and Read
Climate change is increasing the severity of disasters and adverse weather conditions worldwide, with particularly devastating effects on developing countries and on individuals with lower resources. Climate change is likely to impact mental health and psychosocial well-being via multiple pathways, leading to new challenges. Direct effects such as gradual environmental changes, higher temperatures, and natural disasters, are likely to lead to more indirect consequences such as social and economic stressors, population displacement, and conflict. Climate change, largely the product of industrialized nations, is projected to magnify existing inequalities and to impact the most vulnerable, including those with low resources, individuals living in developing countries and specific populations such as women, children and those with pre-existing disabilities. This book outlines areas of impact on human well being, consider specific populations, and shed light on mitigating the impact of climate change. Recommendations discuss ways of strengthening community resilience, building on local capacities, responding to humanitarian crises, as well as conducting research and evaluation projects in diverse settings.

The Psychology Of Pro Environmental Communication

Author: Christian A. Klöckner
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137348321
Size: 26.96 MB
Format: PDF
View: 2400
Download and Read
The environment is part of everyone's life but there are difficulties in communicating complex environmental problems, such as climate change, to a lay audience. In this book Klöckner defines environmental communication, providing a comprehensive and up-to-date analysis of the issues involved in encouraging pro-environmental behaviour.

Facing Climate Change

Author: Jeffrey T. Kiehl
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231541163
Size: 32.73 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 6965
Download and Read
Facing Climate Change explains why people refuse to accept evidence of a warming planet and shows how to move past partisanship to reach a consensus for action. A climate scientist and licensed Jungian analyst, Jeffrey T. Kiehl examines the psychological phenomena that twist our relationship to the natural world and their role in shaping the cultural beliefs that distance us further from nature. He also accounts for the emotions triggered by the lived experience of climate change and the feelings of fear and loss they inspire, which lead us to deny the reality of our warming planet. But it is not too late. By evaluating our way of being, Kiehl unleashes a potential human emotional understanding that can reform our behavior and help protect the Earth. Kiehl dives deep into the human brain's psychological structures and human spirituality's imaginative power, mining promising resources for creating a healthier connection to the environment—and one another. Facing Climate Change is as concerned with repairing our social and political fractures as it is with reestablishing our ties to the world, teaching us to push past partisanship and unite around the shared attributes that are key to our survival. Kiehl encourages policy makers and activists to appeal to our interdependence as a global society, extracting politics from the process and making decisions about our climate future that are substantial and sustaining.

The Oxford Handbook Of Environmental And Conservation Psychology

Author: Susan D. Clayton
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199733023
Size: 32.17 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 1125
Download and Read
This handbook brings together contributions from experts in environmental and/or conservation psychology to review the current state of research. In addition to summarizing current knowledge, it provides an understanding of the relationship between environmental and conservation psychology, and of the directions in which these interdependent areas of study are heading.

What We Think About When We Try Not To Think About Global Warming

Author: Per Espen Stoknes
Publisher: Chelsea Green Publishing
ISBN: 1603585842
Size: 38.67 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 2584
Download and Read
Why does knowing more mean believing—and doing—less? A prescription for change The more facts that pile up about global warming, the greater the resistance to them grows, making it harder to enact measures to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and prepare communities for the inevitable change ahead. It is a catch-22 that starts, says psychologist and economist Per Espen Stoknes, from an inadequate understanding of the way most humans think, act, and live in the world around them. With dozens of examples—from the private sector to government agencies—Stoknes shows how to retell the story of climate change and, at the same time, create positive, meaningful actions that can be supported even by deniers. In What We Think About When We Try Not To Think About Global Warming, Stoknes not only masterfully identifies the five main psychological barriers to climate action, but addresses them with five strategies for how to talk about global warming in a way that creates action and solutions, not further inaction and despair. These strategies work with, rather than against, human nature. They are social, positive, and simple—making climate-friendly behaviors easy and convenient. They are also story-based, to help add meaning and create community, and include the use of signals, or indicators, to gauge feedback and be constantly responsive. Whether you are working on the front lines of the climate issue, immersed in the science, trying to make policy or educate the public, or just an average person trying to make sense of the cognitive dissonance or grapple with frustration over this looming issue, What We Think About When We Try Not To Think About Global Warming moves beyond the psychological barriers that block progress and opens new doorways to social and personal transformation.

Environment Ethics And Behavior

Author: Max H. Bazerman
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 9780787908096
Size: 77.77 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 2858
Download and Read
In this collection of essays, leading social, cognitive and decision psychologists offer psychological theory and contemporary environmental and ethical issues.