Download puerto rico culture politics and identity in pdf or read puerto rico culture politics and identity in pdf online books in PDF, EPUB and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to get puerto rico culture politics and identity in pdf book now. This site is like a library, Use search box in the widget to get ebook that you want.



Puerto Rico

Author: Nancy Morris
Publisher: Praeger/Greenwood
ISBN: 9780275954529
Size: 66.63 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 4954
Download and Read
"Explores how local political elites have shaped Puerto Rican identity during almost a century of US involvement. Traces Island's political trajectory in its relations with US (pt. 1), and reproduces verbatim interviews with selected political leaders toidentify elements that contribute to Puerto Ricans' sense of nationhood (pt. 2). Concludes that, despite pervasiveness of US cultural norms and the pressure to assimilate, Puerto Rican identity remains resilient to this day (pt. 3)"--Handbook of Latin American Studies, v. 58.

Sponsored Identities

Author: Arlene M. Dávila
Publisher: Temple University Press
ISBN: 9781566395496
Size: 32.40 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 7696
Download and Read
Focusing on the Institute for Puerto Rican Culture - the government institution charged with defining authenticated views of national identity since the 1950s - and on popular festival organizers, author Arlene M. Davila illuminates contestations over appropriate representations of culture in the increasingly mass-mediated context of contemporary Puerto Rico. She examines the creation of an essentialist view of nationhood based on a peasant culture and a "unifying" Hispanic heritage and explores the ways in which grassroots organizations challenge and reconfigure definitions of national identity, through their own activities and representations.

Ta No Revival

Author: Gabriel Haslip-Viera
Publisher: Markus Wiener Pub
ISBN:
Size: 16.64 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 4794
Download and Read
"Modern critics now claim that the Taino heritage has been canonized through state-sponsored institutions, such as festivals, museums, and textbooks, at the expense of blacks. In the past, officials, alarmed at the black majorities on the other Caribbean Islands, tried to "whiten" Puerto Rican society by calling all people of color Tainos. Others complain that the Taino revival lost its fervor, evolving from an anti-colonialist movement to a mere fashionable trend. Still the Taino heritage remains a central part of Puerto Rican Identity in the 21st century."--BOOK JACKET.

Puerto Rican Citizen

Author: Lorrin Thomas
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226796108
Size: 59.76 MB
Format: PDF
View: 5495
Download and Read
By the end of the 1920s, just ten years after the Jones Act first made them full-fledged Americans, more than 45,000 native Puerto Ricans had left their homes and entered the United States, citizenship papers in hand, forming one of New York City’s most complex and distinctive migrant communities. In Puerto Rican Citizen, Lorrin Thomas for the first time unravels the many tensions—historical, racial, political, and economic—that defined the experience of this group of American citizens before and after World War II. Building its incisive narrative from a wide range of archival sources, interviews, and first-person accounts of Puerto Rican life in New York, this book illuminates the rich history of a group that is still largely invisible to many scholars. At the center of Puerto Rican Citizen are Puerto Ricans’ own formulations about political identity, the responses of activists and ordinary migrants to the failed promises of American citizenship, and their expectations of how the American state should address those failures. Complicating our understanding of the discontents of modern liberalism, of race relations beyond black and white, and of the diverse conceptions of rights and identity in American life, Thomas’s book transforms the way we understand this community’s integral role in shaping our sense of citizenship in twentieth-century America.

From Bomba To Hip Hop

Author: Juan Flores
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 9780231110778
Size: 17.99 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 2075
Download and Read
"Essential reading for understanding both national and panethnic issues that influence cultural expression and the construction of Puerto Rican identity in the US. Analyzes distinctiveness of Puerto Rican culture in New York in relation to that of other US Latino groups. Theoretically grounded essays address many of the contradictions behind the complex process of identity construction among Puerto Ricans and other Latinos. Focuses on popular music and literature"--Handbook of Latin American Studies, v. 58.

The Puerto Rican Nation On The Move

Author: Jorge Duany
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 0807861472
Size: 80.38 MB
Format: PDF
View: 2080
Download and Read
Puerto Ricans maintain a vibrant identity that bridges two very different places--the island of Puerto Rico and the U.S. mainland. Whether they live on the island, in the States, or divide time between the two, most imagine Puerto Rico as a separate nation and view themselves primarily as Puerto Rican. At the same time, Puerto Ricans have been U.S. citizens since 1917, and Puerto Rico has been a U.S. commonwealth since 1952. Jorge Duany uses previously untapped primary sources to bring new insights to questions of Puerto Rican identity, nationalism, and migration. Drawing a distinction between political and cultural nationalism, Duany argues that the Puerto Rican "nation" must be understood as a new kind of translocal entity with deep cultural continuities. He documents a strong sharing of culture between island and mainland, with diasporic communities tightly linked to island life by a steady circular migration. Duany explores the Puerto Rican sense of nationhood by looking at cultural representations produced by Puerto Ricans and considering how others--American anthropologists, photographers, and museum curators, for example--have represented the nation. His sources of information include ethnographic fieldwork, archival research, interviews, surveys, censuses, newspaper articles, personal documents, and literary texts.

Hispanic Nation

Author: Geoffrey E. Fox
Publisher: University of Arizona Press
ISBN: 9780816517992
Size: 69.29 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 7265
Download and Read
A new ethnic identity is being constructed in the United States: the Hispanic nation. Overcoming age-old racial, regional, and political differences, Americans of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, and other Spanish-language origins are beginning to imagine themselves as a single ethnic community - which by the turn of the century may become the United States' largest and most influential minority. Only in recent years have great numbers of Hispanics begun to consider themselves as related within a single culture. Hispanics are redefining their own images and agendas, shaping a population, and paving wider pathways to power. In the process, they are changing both themselves and the culture, government, and urban habits of the communities around them. In this ground-breaking book, Geoffrey Fox shows how and why Hispanics are changing the United States. Based on interviews, observations, and extensive research, Hispanic Nation examines why such diverse people are imagining themselves as one; the politics of turning a statistical fiction into a social reality; the impact of the Spanish-language media on Hispanics' self-images; ethnic consciousness and political movements (Cesar Chavez and the farm workers movement, the Young Lords and La Raza Unida, Puerto Rican and Mexican encounters in the Midwest); controversies surrounding "high" and popular Hispanic/Latino art, music, and literature; and the institutionalization of the movement everywhere - from local school boards to the U.S. Congress.

Eating Puerto Rico

Author: Cruz Miguel Ortíz Cuadra
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469608847
Size: 45.56 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 2645
Download and Read
Available for the first time in English, Cruz Miguel Ortiz Cuadra's magisterial history of the foods and eating habits of Puerto Rico unfolds into an examination of Puerto Rican society from the Spanish conquest to the present. Each chapter is centered on an iconic Puerto Rican foodstuff, from rice and cornmeal to beans, roots, herbs, fish, and meat. Ortiz shows how their production and consumption connects with race, ethnicity, gender, social class, and cultural appropriation in Puerto Rico. Using a multidisciplinary approach and a sweeping array of sources, Ortiz asks whether Puerto Ricans really still are what they ate. Whether judging by a host of social and economic factors--or by the foods once eaten that have now disappeared--Ortiz concludes that the nature of daily life in Puerto Rico has experienced a sea change.

The Sovereign Colony

Author: Antonio Sotomayor
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 0803285388
Size: 19.68 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 3630
Download and Read
Ceded to the United States under the terms of the Treaty of Paris after the Spanish-American War of 1898, Puerto Rico has since remained a colonial territory. Despite this subordinated colonial experience, however, Puerto Ricans managed to secure national Olympic representation in the 1930s and in so doing nurtured powerful ideas of nationalism. By examining how the Olympic movement developed in Puerto Rico, Antonio Sotomayor illuminates the profound role sports play in the political and cultural processes of an identity that developed within a political tradition of autonomy rather than traditional political independence. Significantly, it was precisely in the Olympic arena that Puerto Ricans found ways to participate and show their national pride, often by using familiar colonial strictures--and the United States' claim to democratic values--to their advantage. Drawing on extensive archival research, both on the island and in the United States, Sotomayor uncovers a story of a people struggling to escape the colonial periphery through sport and nationhood yet balancing the benefits and restraints of that same colonial status. The Sovereign Colony describes the surprising negotiations that gave rise to Olympic sovereignty in a colonial nation, a unique case in Latin America, and uses Olympic sports as a window to view the broader issues of nation building and identity, hegemony, postcolonialism, international diplomacy, and Latin American-U.S. relations.

Negotiating Empire

Author: Solsiree del Moral
Publisher: University of Wisconsin Pres
ISBN: 0299289338
Size: 74.20 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 4646
Download and Read
After the United States invaded Puerto Rico in 1898, the new unincorporated territory sought to define its future. Seeking to shape the next generation and generate popular support for colonial rule, U.S. officials looked to education as a key venue for promoting the benefits of Americanization. At the same time, public schools became a site where Puerto Rican teachers, parents, and students could formulate and advance their own projects for building citizenship. In Negotiating Empire, Solsiree del Moral demonstrates how these colonial intermediaries aimed for regeneration and progress through education. Rather than seeing U.S. empire in Puerto Rico during this period as a contest between two sharply polarized groups, del Moral views their interaction as a process of negotiation. Although educators and families rejected some tenets of Americanization, such as English-language instruction, they also redefined and appropriated others to their benefit to increase literacy and skills required for better occupations and social mobility. Pushing their citizenship-building vision through the schools, Puerto Ricans negotiated a different school project—one that was reformist yet radical, modern yet traditional, colonial yet nationalist.