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Race And The Crisis Of Humanism

Author: Kay Anderson
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136611339
Size: 12.47 MB
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The idea that humankind constituted a unity, albeit at different stages of 'development', was in the 19th century challenged with a new way of thinking. The 'savagery' of certain races was no longer regarded as a stage in their progress towards 'civilisation', but as their permanent state. What caused this shift? In Kay Anderson's provocative new account, she argues that British colonial encounters in Australia from the late 1700s with the apparently unimproved condition of the Australian Aborigine, viewed against an understanding of 'humanity' of the time (that is, as characterised by separation from nature), precipitated a crisis in existing ideas of what it meant to be human. This lucid, intelligent and persuasive argument will be necessary reading for all scholars and upper-level students interested in the history and theories of 'race', critical human geography, anthropology, and Australian and environmental studies.

Against Race

Author: Paul Gilroy
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674000964
Size: 50.69 MB
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After all the "progress" made since World War II in matters pertaining to race, why are we still conspiring to divide humanity into different identity groups based on skin color? Did all the good done by the Civil Rights Movement and the decolonization of the Third World have such little lasting effect? In this provocative book Paul Gilroy contends that race-thinking has distorted the finest promises of modern democracy. He compels us to see that fascism was the principal political innovation of the twentieth century--and that its power to seduce did not die in a bunker in Berlin. Aren't we in fact using the same devices the Nazis used in their movies and advertisements when we make spectacles of our identities and differences? Gilroy examines the ways in which media and commodity culture have become preeminent in our lives in the years since the 1960s and especially in the 1980s with the rise of hip-hop and other militancies. With this trend, he contends, much that was wonderful about black culture has been sacrificed in the service of corporate interests and new forms of cultural expression tied to visual technologies. He argues that the triumph of the image spells death to politics and reduces people to mere symbols. At its heart, Against Race is a utopian project calling for the renunciation of race. Gilroy champions a new humanism, global and cosmopolitan, and he offers a new political language and a new moral vision for what was once called "anti-racism."

We Are All Black

Author: Abhijit Naskar
Publisher: Neuro Cookies
ISBN: 1386392499
Size: 36.36 MB
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“If origin defines race, then we are all Africans – we are all black. No matter how fascinatingly white one’s skin is, or how classy one’s accent of English is, the fact remains, the whole of humanity comes from the land of Africa. It is the cradle of our species.” In this scientific literature, the celebrated Scientist Abhijit Naskar makes a humanitarian attempt with his sharp insight of the molecular realm of the mind, to unite all of humanity with the thread of biological oneness. This is a treatise of biological sciences that makes humanism triumph over the primordial evil of racial discrimination. In “We Are All Black” Naskar makes us delve deep into the neural domain of the human mind, to recognize the innate biological seeds of Racism, and empowers us to make more effective and conscientious efforts to terminate this primitive evil from the human society. We emerge from this spell-binding odyssey of science and philosophy with one sole conviction, that we are all humans coming from Africa.

The Age Of The Crisis Of Man

Author: Mark Greif
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400852102
Size: 63.55 MB
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In a midcentury American cultural episode forgotten today, intellectuals of all schools shared a belief that human nature was under threat. The immediate result was a glut of dense, abstract books on the "nature of man." But the dawning "age of the crisis of man," as Mark Greif calls it, was far more than a historical curiosity. In this ambitious intellectual and literary history, Greif recovers this lost line of thought to show how it influenced society, politics, and culture before, during, and long after World War II. During the 1930s and 1940s, fears of the barbarization of humanity energized New York intellectuals, Chicago protoconservatives, European Jewish émigrés, and native-born bohemians to seek "re-enlightenment," a new philosophical account of human nature and history. After the war this effort diffused, leading to a rebirth of modern human rights and a new power for the literary arts. Critics' predictions of a "death of the novel" challenged writers to invest bloodless questions of human nature with flesh and detail. Hemingway, Faulkner, and Richard Wright wrote flawed novels of abstract man. Succeeding them, Ralph Ellison, Saul Bellow, Flannery O'Connor, and Thomas Pynchon constituted a new guard who tested philosophical questions against social realities—race, religious faith, and the rise of technology—that kept difference and diversity alive. By the 1960s, the idea of "universal man" gave way to moral antihumanism, as new sensibilities and social movements transformed what had come before. Greif's reframing of a foundational debate takes us beyond old antagonisms into a new future, and gives a prehistory to the fractures of our own era.

Renaissance Humanism And Ethnicity Before Race

Author: Ian Campbell
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 1526102641
Size: 64.68 MB
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The modern ideology of race, so important in twentieth-century Europe, incorporates both a theory of human societies and a theory of human bodies. Ian Campbell's new study examines how the elite in early modern Ireland spoke about human societies and human bodies, and demonstrates that this elite discourse was grounded in a commitment to the languages and sciences of Renaissance Humanism. Emphasising the education of all of early modern Ireland's antagonistic ethnic groups in common European university and grammar school traditions, Campbell explains both the workings of the learned English critique of Irish society, and the no less learned Irish response. Then he turns to Irish debates on nobility, medicine and theology in order to illuminate the problem of human heredity. He concludes by demonstrating how the Enlightenment swept away these humanist theories of body and society, prior to the development of modern racial ideology in the late eighteenth century.

The Oxford Handbook Of The Archaeology Of The Contemporary World

Author: Paul Graves-Brown
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191663956
Size: 77.67 MB
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It has been clear for many years that the ways in which archaeology is practised have been a direct product of a particular set of social, cultural, and historical circumstances - archaeology is always carried out in the present. More recently, however, many have begun to consider how archaeological techniques might be used to reflect more directly on the contemporary world itself: how we might undertake archaeologies of, as well as in the present. This Handbook is the first comprehensive survey of an exciting and rapidly expanding sub-field and provides an authoritative overview of the newly emerging focus on the archaeology of the present and recent past. In addition to detailed archaeological case studies, it includes essays by scholars working on the relationships of different disciplines to the archaeology of the contemporary world, including anthropology, psychology, philosophy, historical geography, science and technology studies, communications and media, ethnoarchaeology, forensic archaeology, sociology, film, performance, and contemporary art. This volume seeks to explore the boundaries of an emerging sub-discipline, to develop a tool-kit of concepts and methods which are applicable to this new field, and to suggest important future trajectories for research. It makes a significant intervention by drawing together scholars working on a broad range of themes, approaches, methods, and case studies from diverse contexts in different parts of the world, which have not previously been considered collectively.

Handbook Of Cultural Geography

Author: Kay Anderson
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 9780761969259
Size: 14.58 MB
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"The editors of this genuinely brilliant book seem to dare the reader to argue with them from the first page... I would encourage everyone interested in cultural geography, or in the cultural turn within a whole set of human geogrphies, to do likewise." --ANNALS OF THE ASSOCIATION OF AMERICAN GEOGRAPHERS "A richly plural and impassioned re-presentation of cultural geography that eschews everything in the way of boundary drawing and fixity. A re-visioning of the field as "a set of engagements with the world," it contains a vibrant atlas of ever shifting possibilities. Throbbing with commitment, and un-disciplined in the most positive sense of that term, it is exactly what a handbook ought to be." --Professor Allan Pred Department of Geography, University of California at Berkeley Ten sections, with a detailed editorial introduction, the Handbook of Cultural Geography presents a comprehensive statement of the relation between the cultural imagination and the geographical imagination. Emphasising the intellectual diversity of the discipline, the Handbook is a textured overview that presents a state-of-the-art assessment of the key questions informing cultural geography, while also looking at resonances between cultural geography and other disciplines.

Brit Ish

Author: Afua Hirsch
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 1473546893
Size: 29.23 MB
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The Sunday Times bestseller that reveals the uncomfortable truth about race and identity in Britain today You’re British. Your parents are British. Your partner, your children and most of your friends are British. So why do people keep asking where you’re from? We are a nation in denial about our imperial past and the racism that plagues our present. Brit(ish) is Afua Hirsch’s personal and provocative exploration of how this came to be – and an urgent call for change. ‘The book for our divided and dangerous times’ David Olusoga

Humanism

Author: Marly Cornell
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780997981209
Size: 49.84 MB
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In HUMANISM, Rao Chalasani examines the inescapable link between holistic thought and macroeconomics, politics, cumulative knowledge, inclusion, and the individual pursuit of happiness. He contends that in the new century, neither capitalism nor socialism can adjust to fast-changing economic and political conditions or deliver growth to developed or developing countries. Difficult cultural adjustments areheightened by terrorism, nonlinear technological advances, and the unnerving fight between losers and winners in a globalized economy.Without feeding on doomsday scenarios, his model of humanism is a natural unifier of the most positive attributes of capitalism and socialism'a culturally compatible economic and political system built on nine variables and three catalysts that deliver measurable outputs: a sustainable GDP, a balanced environment, and a high wellness index.