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Rebel Private Front And Rear Memoirs Of A Confederate Soldier

Author: William A. Fletcher
Publisher: Pickle Partners Publishing
ISBN: 1786251787
Size: 40.37 MB
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“The recent rediscovery of Rebel Private: Front and Rear, effectively lost for decades, marks an authentic publishing event in the literature of the Civil War. A rare insight into the conflict from the point of view of a Confederate army enlisted man, this compelling memoir has been hailed by historians as a classic and indispensible key to understanding the Southern perspective. Margaret Mitchell even described it as her single most valuable source of research for Gone With the Wind. “This stunning document is the work of a common foot soldier blessed with extraordinary perception and articulateness. After joining the famed Texas Brigade under Stonewall Jackson. Private William A. Fletcher saw action at Second Manassas, Fredericksburg, Gettysburg, Chancellorsville, and Chickamauga. He was wounded several times and escaped from a moving Union prison train before the South’s surrender. In 1907, he published this powerfully evocative account of his exploits, a volume of frank, detailed recollections that spares none of the horror, courage, or absurdity of war. But a fire destroyed all but a few copies before they could be distributed. One copy, however, did make its way to the Library of Congress, where it was eventually discovered. Today, this colorful work has become the voice of the Civil War front-line grunt, speaking to the modern reader with the intensity of personal experience and a vividness of detail that gives it a riveting you-are-there quality.”- Print ed. “Get this riveting book. Fletcher’s description of Gettysburg surpasses almost everything I’ve read anywhere about that battle, including—gasps!—Michael Shaara’s The Killer Angels.”—Jeff Guinn, Fort Worth Star-Telegram “Epitomizes unsung, unintentional greatness.... Readers find themselves in the trenches.... May become seminal reading for Civil War scholars and history buffs.” —St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Rebel Private Front And Rear

Author: William Andrew Fletcher
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 0292740891
Size: 60.90 MB
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Rebel Private Front and Rear is a line soldier's account of the Civil War without heroics. Private Fletcher tells how at Gettysburg he was overcome by a "bad case of cowardly horror" when an order came on the third day to get ready to charge. "I tried to force manhood to the front, but fright would drive it back with a shudder," he confessed. The attack of jitters lasted about fifteen minutes, and then he fell asleep while awaiting the order to advance. But Fletcher could be brave to a fault. He was restless and venturesome and during the lulls between fighting would sometimes ask for permission to go on dangerous scouts into enemy territory. Once, just before Fredericksburg, he slipped out to a haystack in the no-man's-land near the Rappahannock so that he could watch the Yankees build a bridge. And in his last fight at Bentonville he risked his life on a rash and futile impulse to capture a whole squad of Federals. At Second Manassas, Fletcher was struck by a bullet that grazed his bowels and lodged in his hip. His detailed description of his subsequent sensations and experiences is one of the most interesting portions of his narrative. He begged the surgeons to operate, but when they started cutting he howled so profanely that they threatened to abandon him. His reply was: "It don't hurt as badly when I am cursing." Wounded again at Chickamauga, Fletcher was incapacitated for further infantry service and was transferred to Company E, Eighth Texas Cavalry, and served with Terry's Rangers until the end of the war. In north Georgia he participated in a number of thrilling skirmishes with mounted forces of Sherman's command, and in one of these encounters he lost his horse. A short time later, in a daring effort to capture a mount from the Yankees, he was taken prisoner. The story of the forming and execution of his plan to escape by jumping from a moving boxcar is full of suspense and excitement. Rebel Private also reveals Fletcher as something of a philosopher. The narrative is sprinkled with dissertations on unexpected subjects, such as God, justice, and war. He reflects on the rightness and the necessity of "foraging," in home as well as enemy territory, but he tells with evident relish how he and his "pard" of the occasion "pressed" whiskey, honey, and chickens. Fletcher set down his experiences some forty years after the close of the Civil War. His story is told with the artlessness of the natural raconteur. Though the style is unpolished, the memoir makes lively reading because of the author's eye for detail, his straightforward language, and his sense of humor. One of the most frequently cited narratives written by soldiers of Lee's army, it derives its value as a historical source mainly from Fletcher's honesty, his close observations, the richness and variety of his experiences, and the sharpness of his memory.

The Army Of Northern Virginia

Author: Philip Katcher
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135455937
Size: 44.77 MB
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To see the introduction, the table of contents, a generous selection of sample pages, and more, visit the website The Army of Northern Virginia website. The Confederate Army of Northern Virginia was one of the greatest fighting formations in history: a combination of an outstanding commander and an excellent fighting force. This book offers an in-depth study of why this formation was so successful against Northern armies, which often had a greater wealth of resources and manpower and some very able leaders. Almost always outnumbered, Lee's forces were able to record a number of notable victories by giving free rein to subordinates and utilizing the fighting qualities of the army's units to the full. Also includes color and black and white maps.

Co Aytch Erinnerungen Eines Konf Derierten An Den B Rgerkrieg

Author: Sam Watkins
Publisher: neobooks
ISBN: 3738011617
Size: 22.61 MB
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Als im April 1861 der Amerikanische Bürgerkrieg ausbricht, ist der 21jährige Sam Watkins aus Maury County, Tennessee einer der tausenden von Kriegsfreiwilligen, die sich zu den Armeen der Südstaaten melden. Watkins schließt sich der „Co. Aytch" (so die lautmalerische Ausschreibung für „Kompanie H") des 1. Tennessee-Infanterieregiments an und folgt dem Regiment von den ersten kleinen Gefechten in Virginia bis zur vernichtenden Niederlage der konföderierten Tennessee-Armee in der Schlacht von Nashville. In seinen im Jahre 1881 entstandenen Kriegserinnerungen schildert Watkins mit scharfem Blick für das Erzählenswerte und feinem Sinn für Humor all jene furchtbaren und absurd-komischen Geschehnisse, die der Wahnsinn des Krieges für einen Soldaten der konföderierten Tennessee-Armee bereithielt. Dabei gewährt „Co. Aytch", das zu Recht als Standardwerk der Bürgerkriegsliteratur gilt, nicht nur einen wertvollen Einblick in die Erlebnisse und Gedanken des durchschnittlichen „Johnny Reb", sondern ist zugleich bewegendes Zeugnis eines Versuchs der literarischen Vergangenheitsbewältigung. Ein Anhang der erhaltenen, vom Regimentskommandeur verfassten Gefechtsberichte des 1. Tennessee-Regiments zu den Schlachten von Shiloh, Perryville, Murfreesboro und Chickamauga ermöglicht einen aufschlussreichen Vergleich zu den Schilderungen des unmittelbar beteiligten Soldaten.

The Battle Of Fair Oaks

Author: Robert P. Broadwater
Publisher: McFarland
ISBN: 0786485434
Size: 11.64 MB
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In the spring of 1862, Union Major General George B. McClellan’s Army of the Potomac launched a bloody offensive up the Virginia Peninsula in an effort to capture the Confederate capital of Richmond. This study chronicles the pivotal but often overlooked turning point of the Peninsula Campaign—the Battle of Fair Oaks, also known as Seven Pines. At Fair Oaks, Confederate troops succeeded in driving back Union forces from the edge of Richmond before the Union troops stabilized their position. Though both sides claimed victory, the battle marked the end of the Union offensive. Robert E. Lee, J.E.B. Stuart, and Winfield Scott Hancock all rose to national prominence for their roles at Fair Oaks, while McClellan saw his reputation ruined. In the end, the legacy of Fair Oaks is one of missed chances and faulty execution, ensuring the war would continue for nearly three more years.

Why Texans Fought In The Civil War

Author: Charles David Grear
Publisher: Texas A&M University Press
ISBN: 1603448098
Size: 34.94 MB
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In Why Texans Fought in the Civil War, Charles David Grear provides insights into what motivated Texans to fight for the Confederacy. Mining important primary sources—including thousands of letters and unpublished journals—he affords readers the opportunity to hear, often in the combatants’ own words, why it was so important to them to engage in tumultuous struggles occurring so far from home. As Grear notes, in the decade prior to the Civil War the population of Texas had tripled. The state was increasingly populated by immigrants from all parts of the South and foreign countries. When the war began, it was not just Texas that many of these soldiers enlisted to protect, but also their native states, where they had family ties.

Journal Of The Civil War Era

Author: William A. Blair
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 0807852643
Size: 63.88 MB
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The Journal of the Civil War Era Volume 2, Number 2 June 2012 TABLE OF CONTENTS New Approaches to Internationalizing the History of the Civil War Era: A Special Issue Editor's Note William Blair Articles W. Caleb Mcdaniel & Bethany L. Johnson New Approaches to Internationalizing the History of the Civil War: An Introduction Gale L. Kenny Manliness and Manifest Racial Destiny: Jamaica and African American Emigration in the 1850s Edward B. Rugemer Slave Rebels and Abolitionists: The Black Atlantic and the Coming of the Civil War Peter Kolchin Comparative Perspectives on Emancipation in the U.S. South: Reconstruction, Radicalism, and Russia Susan-Mary Grant The Lost Boys: Citizen-Soldiers, Disabled Veterans, and Confederate Nationalism in the Age of People's War Book Reviews Books Received Professional Notes Mark W. Geiger "Follow the Money" Notes on Contributors The Journal of the Civil War Era takes advantage of the flowering of research on the many issues raised by the sectional crisis, war, Reconstruction, and memory of the conflict, while bringing fresh understanding to the struggles that defined the period, and by extension, the course of American history in the nineteenth century.

Rebel Private

Author: William Andrew Fletcher
Publisher: Endeavour Media via PublishDrive
ISBN:
Size: 65.82 MB
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In April 1861 war was declared between the Union and the Confederacy. When the news came it made Fletcher nervous, as he was working but didn’t want to miss his chance to enlist; reaching an agreement, he began his journey the following day. Two years later, on the third day at Gettysburg, Fletcher recalls how he became temporarily afflicted with a “bad case of cowardly horror” following the order to prepare to charge. But Fletcher could also be a restless man and was brave to a fault, frequently seeking permission for dangerous raids or patrols in the lulls between battles. Wounded on numerous occasions, Fletcher became incapacitated for further infantry service and was transferred to the cavalry, where he would serve for the rest of the war. It was during this time that he was taken prisoner by Union troops, and Fletcher’s account of his capture, and the formation and execution of his escape plan is worthy of a classic thriller. With its combination of straightforward prose and unexpected philosophising, Rebel Private is an arresting account of one line soldier’s experience. William Andrew Fletcher (1839-1915) was a lumberman, scout and soldier from Louisiana. In 1856 the family moved to Texas, and five years later he enlisted in the Confederate Army. Serving throughout the Civil War, he survived and returned to Texas, where he later married and raised a family.