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Reconfiguring Citizenship And National Identity In The North American Literary Imagination

Author: Kathy-Ann Tan
Publisher: Wayne State University Press
ISBN: 0814341411
Size: 54.12 MB
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Literature has always played a central role in creating and disseminating culturally specific notions of citizenship, nationhood, and belonging. In Reconfiguring Citizenship and National Identity in the North American Literary Imagination, author Kathy-Ann Tan investigates metaphors, configurations, parameters, and articulations of U.S. and Canadian citizenship that are enacted, renegotiated, and revised in modern literary texts, particularly during periods of emergence and crisis. Tan brings together for the first time a selection of canonical and lesser-known U.S. and Canadian writings for critical consideration. She begins by exploring literary depiction of “willful” or “wayward” citizens and those with precarious bodies that are viewed as threatening, undesirable, unacceptable—including refugees and asylum seekers, undocumented migrants, deportees, and stateless people. She also considers the rights to citizenship and political membership claimed by queer bodies and an examination of "new" and alternative forms of citizenship, such as denizenship, urban citizenship, diasporic citizenship, and Indigenous citizenship. With case studies based on works by a diverse collection of authors—including Nathaniel Hawthorne, Djuna Barnes, Etel Adnan, Sarah Schulman, Walt Whitman, Gail Scott, and Philip Roth—Tan uncovers alternative forms of collectivity, community, and nation across a broad range of perspectives. In line with recent cross-disciplinary explorations in the field, Reconfiguring Citizenship and National Identity in the North American Literary Imagination shows citizenship as less of a fixed or static legal entity and more as a set of symbolic and cultural practices. Scholars of literary studies, cultural studies, and citizenship studies will be grateful for Tan’s illuminating study.

Citizenship In Transnational Perspective

Author: Jatinder Mann
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 3319535293
Size: 59.41 MB
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This edited collection explores citizenship in a transnational perspective, with a focus on Australia, Canada, and New Zealand. It adopts a multi-disciplinary approach and offers historical, legal, political, and sociological perspectives. The two overarching themes of the book are ethnicity and Indigeneity. The contributions in the collection come from widely respected international scholars who approach the subject of citizenship from a range of perspectives: some arguing for a post-citizenship world, others questioning the very concept itself, or its application to Indigenous nations.

Narrating Citizenship And Belonging In Anglophone Canadian Literature

Author: Katja Sarkowsky
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 3319969358
Size: 23.66 MB
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This book examines how concepts of citizenship have been negotiated in Anglophone Canadian literature since the 1970s. Katja Sarkowsky argues that literary texts conceptualize citizenship as political “co-actorship” and as cultural “co-authorship” (Boele van Hensbroek), using citizenship as a metaphor of ambivalent affiliations within and beyond Canada. In its exploration of urban, indigenous, environmental, and diasporic citizenship as well as of citizenship’s growing entanglement with questions of human rights, Canadian literature reflects and feeds into the term’s conceptual diversification. Exploring the works of Guillermo Verdecchia, Joy Kogawa, Jeannette Armstrong, Maria Campbell, Cheryl Foggo, Fred Wah, Michael Ondaatje, and Dionne Brand, this text investigates how citizenship functions to denote emplaced practices of participation in multiple collectives that are not restricted to the framework of the nation-state.

Routledge Handbook Of Global Citizenship Studies

Author: Engin F. Isin
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136237968
Size: 78.33 MB
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Citizenship studies is at a crucial moment of globalizing as a field. What used to be mainly a European, North American, and Australian field has now expanded to major contributions featuring scholarship from Latin America, Asia, Africa, and the Middle East. The Routledge Handbook of Global Citizenship Studies takes into account this globalizing moment. At the same time, it considers how the global perspective exposes the strains and discords in the concept of ‘citizenship’ as it is understood today. With over fifty contributions from international, interdisciplinary experts, the Handbook features state-of-the-art analyses of the practices and enactments of citizenship across broad continental regions (Africas, Americas, Asias and Europes) as well as deterritorialized forms of citizenship (Diasporicity and Indigeneity). Through these analyses, the Handbook provides a deeper understanding of citizenship in both empirical and theoretical terms. This volume sets a new agenda for scholarly investigations of citizenship. Its wide-ranging contributions and clear, accessible style make it essential reading for students and scholars working on citizenship issues across the humanities and social sciences.

Postkoloniale Theorie

Author: María do Mar Castro Varela
Publisher: transcript Verlag
ISBN: 3839411483
Size: 57.91 MB
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Die koloniale Beherrschung stellt ein wirkmächtiges Ereignis solchen Ausmaßes dar, dass es nicht verwundert, dass postkoloniale Studien aktuell zu den einflussreichsten kritischen Interventionen zählen. Postkoloniale Theorie zielt darauf ab, die verschiedenen Ebenen kolonialer Begegnungen in textlicher, figuraler, räumlicher, historischer, politischer und wirtschaftlicher Perspektive zu analysieren. Der Fokus liegt dabei nie auf einzelnen Regionen oder Disziplinen - vielmehr wird versucht, die sozio-historischen Interdependenzen und Verflechtungen zwischen den Ländern des »Südens« und des »Nordens« herauszuarbeiten. Gleichwohl widersetzt sich der Begriff »postkolonial« einer exakten Markierung: Weder bezeichnet er einen spezifisch-historischen Zeitraum noch einen konkreten Inhalt oder ein klar bestimmbares politisches Programm. Diese Einführung eröffnet das weite und dynamische Feld postkolonialer Theoriebildung über eine kritische Debatte der Schriften der drei prominentesten postkolonialen Stimmen - Edward Said, Gayatri Spivak und Homi Bhabha. Die stark überarbeitete und aktualisierte zweite Auflage unterzieht insbesondere die neuen Schriften Spivaks und Bhabhas einer kritischen Würdigung, setzt sich aber auch ausführlich mit den gegenwärtigen Diskussionen um Globalisierung, Religion, Menschenrechte, transnationale Gerechtigkeit, internationales Recht, Entwicklungspolitiken und Dekolonisierung auseinander.

Sociological Abstracts

Author: Leo P. Chall
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 37.22 MB
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CSA Sociological Abstracts abstracts and indexes the international literature in sociology and related disciplines in the social and behavioral sciences. The database provides abstracts of journal articles and citations to book reviews drawn from over 1,800+ serials publications, and also provides abstracts of books, book chapters, dissertations, and conference papers.

National Manhood

Author: Dana D. Nelson
Publisher: Duke University Press Books
ISBN: 9780822321491
Size: 75.22 MB
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DIVNational Manhood explores the relationship between gender, race, and nation by tracing developing ideals of citizenship in the United States from the Revolutionary War through the 1850s. Through an extensive reading of literary and historical documents, Dana D. Nelson analyzes the social and political articulation of a civic identity centered around the white male and points to a cultural moment in which the theoretical consolidation of white manhood worked to ground, and perhaps even found, the nation. Using political, scientific, medical, personal, and literary texts ranging from the Federalist papers to the ethnographic work associated with the Lewis and Clark expedition to the medical lectures of early gynecologists, Nelson explores the referential power of white manhood, how and under what conditions it came to stand for the nation, and how it came to be a fraternal articulation of a representative and civic identity in the United States. In examining early exemplary models of national manhood and by tracing its cultural generalization, National Manhood reveals not only how an impossible ideal has helped to form racist and sexist practices, but also how this ideal has simultaneously privileged and oppressed white men, who, in measuring themselves against it, are able to disavow their part in those oppressions. Historically broad and theoretically informed, National Manhood reaches across disciplines to engage those studying early national culture, race and gender issues, and American history, literature, and culture. /div