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Reproducing Racism

Author: Wendy Leo Moore
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 9780742560062
Size: 80.86 MB
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Law schools serve as gateway institutions into one of the most politically powerful social fields: the profession of law. Reproducing Racism is an examination of white privilege and power in two elite United States law schools. Moore examines how racial structures, racialized everyday practices, and racial discourses function in law schools. Utilizing an ethnographic lens, Moore explores the historical construction of elite law schools as institutions that reinforce white privilege and therefore naturalize white political, social, and economic power.

Racial Profiling

Author: Karen S. Glover
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 9780742561052
Size: 35.42 MB
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This book is a critical examination of mainstream research on racial profiling. Through qualitative analysis of interviews with people of color who have experienced racial profiling, it offers an alternative understanding of racialized law and the traffic stop as the manifestation of racialized law enforcement.

Teaching Race And Anti Racism In Contemporary America

Author: Kristin Haltinner
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9400771010
Size: 54.78 MB
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This book presents thoughtful reflections and in-depth, critical analyses of the new challenges and opportunities instructors face in teaching race during what has been called the “post-racial era”. It examines the racial dimensions of the current political, economic, and cultural climate. The book features renowned scholars and experienced teachers from a range of disciplines and offers successful strategies for teaching important concepts through case studies and active learning exercises. It provides innovative strategies, novel lesson plans and classroom activities for college and university professors who seek effective methods and materials for teaching about race and racism to today’s students. A valuable handbook for educators, this book should be required reading for all graduate students and college instructors.

Making Law And Courts Research Relevant

Author: Brandon L. Bartels
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317693469
Size: 18.56 MB
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One of the more enduring topics of concern for empirically-oriented scholars of law and courts—and political scientists more generally—is how research can be more directly relevant to broader audiences outside of academia. A significant part of this issue goes back to a seeming disconnect between empirical and normative scholars of law and courts that has increased in recent years. Brandon L. Bartels and Chris W. Bonneau argue that being attuned to the normative implications of one’s work enhances the quality of empirical work, not to mention makes it substantially more interesting to both academics and non-academic practitioners. Their book’s mission is to examine how the normative implications of empirical work in law and courts can be more visible and relevant to audiences beyond academia. Written by scholars of political science, law, and sociology, the chapters in the volume offer ideas on a methodology for communicating normative implications in a balanced, nuanced, and modest manner. The contributors argue that if empirical work is strongly suggestive of certain policy or institutional changes, scholars should make those implications known so that information can be diffused. The volume consists of four sections that respectively address the general enterprise of developing normative implications of empirical research, law and decisionmaking, judicial selection, and courts in the broader political and societal context. This volume represents the start of a conversation on the topic of how the normative implications of empirical research in law and courts can be made more visible. This book will primarily interest scholars of law and courts, as well as students of judicial politics. Other subfields of political science engaging in empirical research will also find the suggestions made in the book relevant.

Prejudice In Politics

Author: W E B Du Bois Professor of the Social Sciences Harvard University Lawrence D Bobo
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674013292
Size: 65.14 MB
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The authors explore a lengthy controversy surrounding fishing, hunting, and gathering rights of Chippewa Indians in Wisconsin. The book uses a carefully designed survey of public opinion to explore the dynamics of prejudice and political contestation, and to further our understanding of how and why racial prejudice enters into politics in the U.S.

White Party White Government

Author: Joe R. Feagin
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136332626
Size: 32.92 MB
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White Party, White Government examines the centuries-old impact of systemic racism on the U.S. political system. The text assesses the development by elite and other whites of a racialized capitalistic system, grounded early in slavery and land theft, and its intertwining with a distinctive political system whose fundamentals were laid down in the founding decades. From these years through the Civil War and Reconstruction, to the 1920s, the 1930s Roosevelt era, the 1960s Johnson era, through to the Ronald Reagan, George H.W. Bush, and Barack Obama presidencies, Feagin exploring the effects of ongoing demographic changes on the present and future of the U.S. political system.

The Church Enslaved

Author: Tony Campolo
Publisher: Fortress Press
ISBN: 9781451414646
Size: 13.55 MB
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Two of the most vocal activists on racial issues in the church here seek nothing less than a conversion of American Christianity. Campolo and Battle expose the sad history and present realities of racism in the churches and then lift up a vision of a church and society without racism. To achieve reconciliation among Christians, they argue, both black and white churches need to acknowledge and overcome substantial problems in their traditions. Campolo and Battle then directly challenge Christians to a deeper spirituality, enabling them to resume leadership in overcoming and redressing America's legacy of racial division.

Schools Betrayed

Author: Kathryn M. Neckerman
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226569624
Size: 57.36 MB
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The problems commonly associated with inner-city schools were not nearly as pervasive a century ago, when black children in most northern cities attended school alongside white children. In Schools Betrayed, her innovative history of race and urban education, Kathryn M. Neckerman tells the story of how and why these schools came to serve black children so much worse than their white counterparts. Focusing on Chicago public schools between 1900 and 1960, Neckerman compares the circumstances of blacks and white immigrants, groups that had similarly little wealth and status yet came to gain vastly different benefits from their education. Their divergent educational outcomes, she contends, stemmed from Chicago officials’ decision to deal with rising African American migration by segregating schools and denying black students equal resources. And it deepened, she shows, because of techniques for managing academic failure that only reinforced inequality. Ultimately, these tactics eroded the legitimacy of the schools in Chicago’s black community, leaving educators unable to help their most disadvantaged students. Schools Betrayed will be required reading for anyone who cares about urban education.

Crossroads Directions And A New Critical Race Theory

Author: Francisco Valdes
Publisher: Temple University Press
ISBN: 9781566399302
Size: 28.52 MB
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Its opponents call it part of "the lunatic fringe," a justification for "black separateness," "the most embarrassing trend in American publishing." "It" is Critical Race Theory. But what is Critical Race Theory? How did it develop? Where does it stand now? Where should it go in the future? In this volume, thirty-one CRT scholars present their views on the ideas and methods of CRT, its role in academia and in the culture at large, and its past, present, and future. Critical race theorists assert that both the procedures and the substance of American law are structured to maintain white privilege. The neutrality and objectivity of the law are not just unattainable ideals; they are harmful actions that obscure the law's role in protecting white supremacy. This notion—so obvious to some, so unthinkable to others—has stimulated and divided legal thinking in this country and, increasingly, abroad. The essays in Crossroads, Directions, and a New Critical Race Theory—all original—address this notion in a variety of helpful and exciting ways. They use analysis, personal experience, historical narrative, and many other techniques to explain the importance of looking critically at how race permeates our national consciousness.