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Restoring Heritage Grains

Author: Eli Rogosa
Publisher: Chelsea Green Publishing
ISBN: 1603586709
Size: 16.95 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Including recipes for baking with Einkorn Wheat has long been one of the world's most widely consumed and cultivated grains, yet it has been transformed over the course of the past fifty to one hundred years. Once considered as iconic "amber waves of grain" and as an essential staple crop for making "our daily bread" or "staff of life," today we are just as apt to hear about the ill effects of consuming it. Witness the increased incidence of gluten intolerance or "wheat belly." What has changed, in large part, is the way in which we grow our wheat and the modern varieties that have made possible enormous harvests, but at a very steep cost. Large industrial farming, dependent on monocultures and the heavy use of fertilizers and herbicides, can have deleterious effects, not only on our own health, but that of our land, water, and environment as a whole. Fortunately, heritage "landrace" wheats--crops that have been selected over generations to be well adapted to their local environments--do not need bio-chemical interventions to grow well and yield bountifully. Yet these robust and diverse wheats that nourished our ancestors for countless generations are nearly extinct today. In Restoring Heritage Grains, author Eli Rogosa, of the Heritage Grain Conservancy, invites readers to pore over a menagerie of "forgotten" grains: diverse, landrace wheat varieties such as emmer, a strain domesticated in the Fertile Crescent that is perfect for pasta and flatbreads; mirabil, or the "miracle wheat"; durum, a high-protein, low-gluten variety; and Indian wheat, also known as shot, a rare species that is drought-tolerant and high in protein. These and the many other heritage grains Rogosa exhibits each have a lineage intertwined with that of the human species, and can and should be grown once again. Combining the history of grain growing and society, in-depth practical advice on landrace wheat husbandry, wheat folktales and mythology, and recipes for flours, breads, and beers, Restoring Heritage Grains invites readers to explore a rich history that has only recently been overshadowed by modern industrial wheat. In the end, organically grown, diverse wheat may well be one the best solutions to hunger, one that will be needed to feed the world's growing population in the decades to come.

Homegrown Whole Grains

Author: Sara Pitzer
Publisher: Storey Publishing
ISBN: 160342153X
Size: 15.42 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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A resource that has everything gardeners need to know to grow, harvest, store, grind, and cook small crops of nine types of whole grains also includes fifty recipes to bring whole grains to the family table. Original.

The Organic Grain Grower

Author: Jack Lazor
Publisher: Chelsea Green Publishing
ISBN: 1603583653
Size: 64.26 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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The Organic Grain Grower is an invaluable resource for both home-scale and commercial producers interested in expanding their resiliency and drop diversity through growing their own grains. Longtime farmer and organic pioneer Jack Lazor covers how to grow and store wheat, barley, oats, corn, dry beans, soybeans, oilseeds, grasses, nutrient-dense forages, and lesser-known cereals. In addition, Lazor argues the importance of integrating grains on the organic farm (not to mention within the local food system) for reasons of biodiversity and whole-farm management. The Organic Grain Grower provides information on wide-ranging topics, from nutrient density and building soil fertility to machinery and grinding grains for livestock rations.--COVER.

Gods Wasps And Stranglers

Author: Mike Shanahan
Publisher: Chelsea Green Publishing
ISBN: 1603587152
Size: 19.67 MB
Format: PDF
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They are trees of life and trees of knowledge. They are wish-fulfillers ... rainforest royalty ... more precious than gold. They are the fig trees, and they have affected humanity in profound but little-known ways. Gods, Wasps and Stranglers tells their amazing story. Fig trees fed our pre-human ancestors, influenced diverse cultures and played key roles in the dawn of civilization. They feature in every major religion, starring alongside Adam and Eve, Krishna and Buddha, Jesus and Muhammad. This is no coincidence – fig trees are special. They evolved when giant dinosaurs still roamed and have been shaping our world ever since. These trees intrigued Aristotle and amazed Alexander the Great. They were instrumental in Kenya’s struggle for independence and helped restore life after Krakatoa’s catastrophic eruption. Egypt’s Pharaohs hoped to meet fig trees in the afterlife and Queen Elizabeth II was asleep in one when she ascended the throne. And all because 80 million years ago these trees cut a curious deal with some tiny wasps. Thanks to this deal, figs sustain more species of birds and mammals than any other trees, making them vital to rainforests. In a time of falling trees and rising temperatures, their story offers hope. Ultimately, it’s a story about humanity’s relationship with nature. The story of the fig trees stretches back tens of millions of years, but it is as relevant to our future as it is to our past.

The New Bread Basket

Author: Amy Halloran
Publisher: Chelsea Green Publishing
ISBN: 1603585680
Size: 73.20 MB
Format: PDF
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For more than 10,000 years, grains have been the staples of Western civilization. The stored energy of grain allowed our ancestors to shift from nomadic hunting and gathering and build settled communities—even great cities. Though most bread now comes from factory bakeries, the symbolism of wheat and bread—amber waves of grain, the staff of life—still carries great meaning. Today, bread and beer are once again building community as a new band of farmers, bakers, millers, and maltsters work to reinvent local grain systems. The New Bread Basket tells their stories and reveals the village that stands behind every loaf and every pint. While eating locally grown crops like heirloom tomatoes has become almost a cliché, grains are late in arriving to local tables, because growing them requires a lot of land and equipment. Milling, malting, and marketing take both tools and cooperation. The New Bread Basket reveals the bones of that cooperation, profiling the seed breeders, agronomists, and grassroots food activists who are collaborating with farmers, millers, bakers, and other local producers. Take Andrea and Christian Stanley, a couple who taught themselves the craft of malting and opened the first malthouse in New England in one hundred years. Outside Ithaca, New York, bread from a farmer-miller-baker partnership has become an emblem in the battle against shale gas fracking. And in the Pacific Northwest, people are shifting grain markets from commodity exports to regional feed, food, and alcohol production. Such pioneering grain projects give consumers an alternative to industrial bread and beer, and return their production to a scale that respects people, local communities, and the health of the environment. Many Americans today avoid gluten and carbohydrates. Yet, our shared history with grains—from the village baker to Wonder Bread—suggests that modern changes in farming and processing could be the real reason that grains have become suspect in popular nutrition. The people profiled in The New Bread Basket are returning to traditional methods like long sourdough fermentations that might address the dietary ills attributed to wheat. Their work and lives make our foundational crops visible, and vital, again.

Wheat Flour Milling

Author: Elieser S. Posner
Publisher: Amer Assn of Cereal Chemists
ISBN: 9781891127403
Size: 60.87 MB
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Updated for the first time in 7 years, Wheat Flour Milling, 2nd Edition brings together essential information about new and innovative approaches to the practice of wheat flour milling. Like the popular first edition, it includes in-depth coverage of current methods, technology, procedures, and equipment used in wheat flour milling, presenting specific ways to streamline mill operations and maximize flour quality while offering a general overview of industry practices. Explaining all machinery and phases of the milling process, including storing and blending, cleaning and conditioning, grinding, sieving, and purifying, this extensive resource provides answers to all your technical questions. Tables of specific mill engineering data provide application for mill design, while chemistry and analytical information and improved laboratory techniques allow for greater accuracy in mill operation. Explanations on the theory of the process provide knowledge useful to all involved in milling or the end product.The second edition is thoroughly updated and expanded to reflect the changes that have occurred since the first edition was published and to provide more detailed information. For example, durum wheat and soft wheat have separate chapters for a more detailed focus on specific characteristics. In addition, new topics such as Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP), International Organization for Standardization (ISO), and Mill Management are covered. The glossary has also been expanded for easy access and understanding of milling terms. Practical conversion factors, the detailed index, and quick web references to all subjects related to wheat flour milling make finding the information you need quick and easy.Millers, bakers, product manufacturers, grain scientists, quality assurance professionals, government agencies, wheat growers, wheat buyers, mill designers, educators, and students are sure to find this a useful, in-depth resource.

Six Thousand Years Of Bread

Author: H. E. Jacob
Publisher: Pickle Partners Publishing
ISBN: 1787201279
Size: 33.98 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Yeast, water, flour, and heat. How could this simple mixture have been the cause of war and plague, celebration and victory supernatural vision and more? In this remarkable and all-encompassing volume, H. E. Jacob takes us through six thousand dynamic years of bread’s role in politics, religion, technology, and beyond. Who were the first bakers? Why were bakers distrusted during the Middle Ages? How did bread cause Napoleon’s defeat? Why were people buried with bread? SIX THOUSAND YEARS OF BREAD has the answers. Jacob follows the story from its beginning in ancient Egypt and continues through to modern times. The poignant and inspiring conclusion of the book relays the author’s experiences in a Nazi concentration camp, subsisting on bread made of sawdust.

Grain Of Truth

Author: Stephen Yafa
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101982918
Size: 38.82 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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No topic in nutrition is more controversial than wheat. While some people suggest that wheat may be the new asbestos, Stephen Yafa finds that it has been wrongly demonised. His revealing book sets the record straight, breaking down the botany of the wheat plant we've hijacked for our own use, the science of nutrition and digestion, the effects of mass production on our health and questions about gluten and fibre - all to point us towards a better, richer diet.

Cooking With Ancient Grains

Author: Maria Baez Kijac
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1440579571
Size: 69.14 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Ancient grains made modern and delicious! Rich in fiber and antioxidants, ancient grains like quinoa, chia, amaranth, and kaniwa are known for their nutritional value. In Cooking with Ancient Grains, you'll discover just how wholesome and tasty these grains are with 75 recipes by award-winning author Maria Baez Kijac. From breakfast and dinner to snacks and desserts, each delicious dish not only provides important nutrients and proteins, but also keeps you feeling full throughout the day. Best of all, you'll never feel trapped in the kitchen with these simple recipes, such as: Palachinkes with Amaranth Flour Dates Stuffed with Gorgonzola, Walnuts, and Kaniwa Quinoa, Black Rice, and Smoked Salmon Salad Mushroom and Watercress Soup with Amaranth Quinoa Macaroni and Broccoli Gratinee Mango Parfait with Chia Seeds Complete with step-by-step instructions and beautiful photographs, Cooking with Ancient Grains will help you harness all of the goodness that quinoa, amaranth, chia, and kaniwa have to offer.

Superfood Grains

Author: Kim Lutz
Publisher: Sterling Epicure
ISBN: 9781454919377
Size: 30.31 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Ancient grains are making a comeback on today's dinner tables including gluten-free options, like millet and sorghum. "Super Grains" celebrates the whole-grain goodness of spelt, farro, einkorn, and even the humble cholesterol-lowering oat, in 75 easy, satisfying recipes. Enjoy crunchy Farro Apple and Almond Salad, Power-Packed Tomato Soup with sorghum, Teff-Lentil Sloppy Joes, and yummy Whole Grain Chocolate Brownies. It s superfood made super delicious!"