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Rethinking Value Added Models In Education

Author: Audrey Amrein-Beardsley
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136702776
Size: 62.57 MB
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Since passage of the of No Child Left Behind Act in 2001, academic researchers, econometricians, and statisticians have been exploring various analytical methods of documenting students‘ academic progress over time. Known as value-added models (VAMs), these methods are meant to measure the value a teacher or school adds to student learning from one year to the next. To date, however, there is very little evidence to support the trustworthiness of these models. What is becoming increasingly evident, yet often ignored mainly by policymakers, is that VAMs are 1) unreliable, 2) invalid, 3) nontransparent, 4) unfair, 5) fraught with measurement errors and 6) being inappropriately used to make consequential decisions regarding such things as teacher pay, retention, and termination. Unfortunately, their unintended consequences are not fully recognized at this point either. Given such, the timeliness of this well-researched and thoughtful book cannot be overstated. This book sheds important light on the debate surrounding VAMs and thereby offers states and practitioners a highly important resource from which they can move forward in more research-based ways.

Big Fish Little Fish

Author: Susan Groundwater-Smith
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1316276813
Size: 19.16 MB
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Big Fish, Little Fish: Teaching and Learning in the Middle Years provides pre-service and early career teachers with a pathway to understanding the needs of students as they make the important transition from primary to secondary schooling. The book explores contemporary challenges for teaching and learning in the middle years, with a focus on student experience, identity, engagement and resilience. Key issues, such as teaching academically at-risk students, the impact of education policy on middle years students, and teacher preparation and identity, are given comprehensive coverage. Unique to this text is its focus on and analysis of the history of middle-years education, as well as its in-depth discussion of the experiences of young Indigenous and Māori students. Drawing on the wide-ranging expertise of its contributors, Big Fish, Little Fish prepares pre-service teachers to best meet the needs of students as they enter the challenging middle years of their education.

Flip The System

Author: Jelmer Evers
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317391594
Size: 21.42 MB
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Education is threatened on a global scale by forces of neoliberalism, through high stakes accountability, privatization and a destructive language of learning. In all respects, a GERM (Global Education Reform Movement) has erupted from international benchmark rankings such as PISA, TIMMS and PIRL, causing inequity, narrowing of the curriculum and teacher deprofessionalization on a truly global scale. In this book, teachers from around the world and other educational experts such as Andy Hargreaves, Ann Lieberman, Stephen Ball, Gert Biesta, Tom Bennett and many more, make the case to move away from this uneducational economic approach, to instead embrace a more humane, more democratic approach to education. This approach is called ‘flipping the system’, a move that places teachers exactly where they need to be - at the steering wheel of educational systems worldwide. This book will appeal to teachers and other education professionals around the world.

The Assessment Of Emergent Bilinguals

Author: Dr. Kate Mahoney
Publisher: Multilingual Matters
ISBN: 1783097280
Size: 55.35 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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This textbook is a comprehensive introduction to the assessment of students in K-12 schools who use two or more languages in their daily life: English Language Learners (ELLs), or Emergent Bilinguals. The book includes a thorough examination of the policy, history and assessment/measurement issues that educators should understand in order to best advocate for their students. The author presents a decision-making framework called PUMI (Purpose, Use, Method, Instrument) that practitioners can use to better inform assessment decisions for bilingual children. The book will be an invaluable resource in teacher preparation programs, but will also help policy-makers and educators make better decisions to support their students.

Value Added Measures In Education

Author: Douglas N. Harris
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781934742068
Size: 42.61 MB
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Douglas Harris takes on one of the most hotly debated topics in education. Drawing on his extensive work with with schools and districts, he sets out to help educators and policy makers understand this innovative approach to assessment, and the issues associated with its use.

How People Learn

Author: National Research Council
Publisher: National Academies Press
ISBN: 0309131979
Size: 46.40 MB
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First released in the Spring of 1999, How People Learn has been expanded to show how the theories and insights from the original book can translate into actions and practice, now making a real connection between classroom activities and learning behavior. This edition includes far-reaching suggestions for research that could increase the impact that classroom teaching has on actual learning. Like the original edition, this book offers exciting new research about the mind and the brain that provides answers to a number of compelling questions. When do infants begin to learn? How do experts learn and how is this different from non-experts? What can teachers and schools do-with curricula, classroom settings, and teaching methods--to help children learn most effectively? New evidence from many branches of science has significantly added to our understanding of what it means to know, from the neural processes that occur during learning to the influence of culture on what people see and absorb. How People Learn examines these findings and their implications for what we teach, how we teach it, and how we assess what our children learn. The book uses exemplary teaching to illustrate how approaches based on what we now know result in in-depth learning. This new knowledge calls into question concepts and practices firmly entrenched in our current education system. Topics include: How learning actually changes the physical structure of the brain. How existing knowledge affects what people notice and how they learn. What the thought processes of experts tell us about how to teach. The amazing learning potential of infants. The relationship of classroom learning and everyday settings of community and workplace. Learning needs and opportunities for teachers. A realistic look at the role of technology in education.

High Need Schools

Author: Devin Thornburg
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 9463007059
Size: 62.24 MB
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This book covers issues that pertain to high-need schools but the authors challenge the distinctions made in the research and reason that the issues are relevant to all schools. From the rise of accountability in the 1960s to now, high-need schools have been dealing with curriculum, program initiatives, and responding to diverse populations, typically without the resources necessary to implement change. In this book we discuss important issues that have to be tackled if we as educators will succeed in meeting the needs of the next generation. From education laws, use of technology, leadership, diversity and multicultural issues, teaching in high-need schools, curriculum and teaching student with special needs, the book explores both problems and solutions, changing the dialogue from one of blame and stasis to one of action and hope.

Student Growth Measures In Policy And Practice

Author: Kimberly Kappler Hewitt
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137539011
Size: 76.95 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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This book examines the intersection of policy and practice in the use of student growth measures (SGMs) for high-stakes purposes as per such educator evaluation systems. The book also focuses on examinations of educators’ perceptions of and reactions to the use of SGMs; ethical implications pertaining to the use of SGMs; contextual challenges when implementing SGMs; and legal implications of SGM use. The use of student test score data has been the cornerstone of the recent transfiguration of educator evaluation systems in forty-two states and the District of Columbia. Three leading voices on SGMs—Sean Corcoran, Henry Braun, and David Berliner—also serve as section and concluding commentators.