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Sacred Steel

Author: Robert L. Stone
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 0252035542
Size: 22.17 MB
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In this book, Robert L. Stone follows the sound of steel guitar into the music-driven Pentecostal worship of two related churches: the House of God and the Church of the Living God. A rare outsider who has gained the trust of members and musicians inside the church, Stone uses nearly two decades of research, interviews, and fieldwork to tell the story of a vibrant musical tradition that straddles sacred and secular contexts. Most often identified with country and western bands, steel guitar is almost unheard of in African American churches--except for the House of God and the Church of the Living God, where it has been part of worship since the 1930s. Sacred Steel traces the tradition through four generations of musicians and in some two hundred churches extending across the country from Florida to California, Michigan to Alabama. Presenting detailed portraits of musical pioneers such as brothers Troman and Willie Eason and contemporary masters such as Chuck Campbell, Glenn Lee, and Robert Randolph, Stone expertly outlines the fundamental tensions between sacred steel musicians and church hierarchy. In this thorough analysis of the tradition, Stone explores the function of the music in church meetings and its effect on the congregations. He also examines recent developments such as the growing number of female performers, the commercial appeal of the music, and younger musicians' controversial move of the music from the church to secular contexts.

African American Folklore An Encyclopedia For Students

Author: Anand Prahlad
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 1610699300
Size: 59.91 MB
Format: PDF
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African American folklore dates back 240 years and has had a significant impact on American culture from the slavery period to the modern day. This encyclopedia provides accessible entries on key elements of this long history, including folklore originally derived from African cultures that have survived here and those that originated in the United States. • Offers the most comprehensive compilation of resources on African American folklore, in the forms of bibliographical citations, lists of websites, and lists of cultural centers • Demonstrates the importance of black folklore to the development of American culture • Contains a unique collection of entries on black folk traditions • Documents the historical, aesthetic influence of African culture on African American folklore

The School Of Arizona Dranes

Author: Timothy Dodge
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 0739167138
Size: 52.78 MB
Format: PDF
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Arizona Dranes (1889-1963) was a true musical innovator whose recordings made for the Okeh label during the years 1926-1928 helped lay the foundations for what would soon be known as gospel music. The School of Arizona Dranes: Gospel Music Pioneer covers the life and career of Dranes and situates her accomplishments in the broader history of African American gospel music and the rise of the Pentecostal movement.

On Highway 61

Author: Dennis McNally
Publisher: Catapult
ISBN: 1619024128
Size: 67.47 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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On Highway 61 explores the historical context of the significant social dissent that was central to the cultural genesis of the sixties. The book is going to search for the deeper roots of American cultural and musical evolution for the past 150 years by studying what the Western European culture learned from African American culture in a historical progression that reaches from the minstrel era to Bob Dylan. The book begins with Americas first great social critic, Henry David Thoreau, and his fundamental source of social philosophy:---his profound commitment to freedom, to abolitionism and to African-American culture. Continuing with Mark Twain, through whom we can observe the rise of minstrelsy, which he embraced, and his subversive satirical masterpiece Huckleberry Finn. While familiar, the book places them into a newly articulated historical reference that shines new light and reveals a progression that is much greater than the sum of its individual parts. As the first post-Civil War generation of black Americans came of age, they introduced into the national culture a trio of musical forms—ragtime, blues, and jazz— that would, with their derivations, dominate popular music to this day. Ragtime introduced syncopation and become the cutting edge of the modern 20th century with popular dances. The blues would combine with syncopation and improvisation and create jazz. Maturing at the hands of Louis Armstrong, it would soon attract a cluster of young white musicians who came to be known as the Austin High Gang, who fell in love with black music and were inspired to play it themselves. In the process, they developed a liberating respect for the diversity of their city and country, which they did not see as exotic, but rather as art. It was not long before these young white rebels were the masters of American pop music – big band Swing. As Bop succeeded Swing, and Rhythm and Blues followed, each had white followers like the Beat writers and the first young rock and rollers. Even popular white genres like the country music of Jimmy Rodgers and the Carter Family reflected significant black influence. In fact, the theoretical separation of American music by race is not accurate. This biracial fusion achieved an apotheosis in the early work of Bob Dylan, born and raised at the northern end of the same Mississippi River and Highway 61 that had been the birthplace of much of the black music he would study. As the book reveals, the connection that began with Thoreau and continued for over 100 years was a cultural evolution where, at first individuals, and then larger portions of society, absorbed the culture of those at the absolute bottom of the power structure, the slaves and their descendants, and realized that they themselves were not free.

Bluegrass Generation

Author: Neil V Rosenberg
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 0252050444
Size: 21.60 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Neil V. Rosenberg met the legendary Bill Monroe at the Brown County Jamboree. Rosenberg's subsequent experiences in Bean Blossom put his feet on the intertwined musical and scholarly paths that made him a preeminent scholar of bluegrass music. Rosenberg's memoir shines a light on the changing bluegrass scene of the early 1960s. Already a fan and aspiring musician, his appetite for banjo music quickly put him on the Jamboree stage. Rosenberg eventually played with Monroe and spent four months managing the Jamboree. Those heights gave him an eyewitness view of nothing less than bluegrass's emergence from the shadow of country music into its own distinct art form. As the likes of Bill Keith and Del McCoury played, Rosenberg watched Monroe begin to share a personal link to the music that tied audiences to its history and his life--and helped turn him into bluegrass's foundational figure. An intimate look at a transformative time, Bluegrass Generation tells the inside story of how an American musical tradition came to be.

Uncommon Faithfulness

Author: Mary Shawn Copeland
Publisher: Orbis Books
ISBN: 1608333582
Size: 24.89 MB
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An engaging study of black catholics, their contributions to the Catholic church, and the challenges they face. These essays describe the experience of black Catholics in this country since their arrival in North america in the sixteenth century ujtil the present day. The essays highlight the difficulties black Catholics faced in their early attempts to join churches and enter religious communities, their participation in the civil rights struggle, and the challenges they face today as they seek full inclusion in the church, whether in terms of liturgical practice or pastoral ministry.

The Death And Life Of Great American Cities

Author: Jane Jacobs
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 052543285X
Size: 59.68 MB
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Thirty years after its publication, The Death and Life of Great American Cities was described by The New York Times as "perhaps the most influential single work in the history of town planning....[It] can also be seen in a much larger context. It is first of all a work of literature; the descriptions of street life as a kind of ballet and the bitingly satiric account of traditional planning theory can still be read for pleasure even by those who long ago absorbed and appropriated the book's arguments." Jane Jacobs, an editor and writer on architecture in New York City in the early sixties, argued that urban diversity and vitality were being destroyed by powerful architects and city planners. Rigorous, sane, and delightfully epigrammatic, Jacobs's small masterpiece is a blueprint for the humanistic management of cities. It is sensible, knowledgeable, readable, indispensable. The author has written a new foreword for this Modern Library edition.

People Get Ready

Author: Bob Darden
Publisher: A&C Black
ISBN: 9780826414366
Size: 74.23 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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From Africa through the spirituals, from minstrel music through jubilee, and from traditional to contemporary gospel, "People Get Ready!" provides, for the first time, an accessible overview of this musical genre.

Ultimate Guide To Tae Kwon Do

Author: John Little
Publisher: McGraw-Hill Education
ISBN: 9780809228317
Size: 42.80 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Characterized by high-flying kicks and punches that easily shatter thick boards, Tae Kwon Do is one of the world's most popular martial arts and exhibition sports. This Korean system of self-defense offers its students improved cardiovascular fitness, strength, flexibility, balance, self-confidence, and peace of mind. Inside Kung-Fu's Ultimate Guide to Tae Kwon Do offers all Tae Kwon Do students--from white belts to black belts--a wealth of insightful, reliable, hard-to-find information from world-renowned experts in every aspect of the art. Inside, you'll find chapters that inform and inspire, addressing such topics as: The history and traditions of Tae Kwon Do Mastering the ten basic movements that are the foundation for all advanced techniques One-step sparring, stretching, competing, and performing great demonstrations Finding and evaluating schools, classes, and instructors Streetwise self-defense applications of Tae Kwon Do techniques In the Ultimate Guide to Tae Kwon Do, you will find everything you need to know to get started and advance through the ranks of this immensely challenging, rigorous, and rewarding martial art. John R. Little is the author of The Warrior Within, Bruce Lee: Words from a Master, and other books on Bruce Lee. He is also the author of numerous published articles on martial arts philosophy and practice. Curtis F. Wong is the publisher of Inside Kung-Fu and other highly respected martial-arts magazines.