Download saltwater slavery a middle passage from africa to american diaspora in pdf or read saltwater slavery a middle passage from africa to american diaspora in pdf online books in PDF, EPUB and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to get saltwater slavery a middle passage from africa to american diaspora in pdf book now. This site is like a library, Use search box in the widget to get ebook that you want.



Saltwater Slavery

Author: Stephanie E. Smallwood
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674043770
Size: 41.10 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 397
Download and Read
This bold, innovative book promises to radically alter our understanding of the Atlantic slave trade, and the depths of its horrors. Stephanie E. Smallwood offers a penetrating look at the process of enslavement from its African origins through the Middle Passage and into the American slave market. Saltwater Slavery is animated by deep research and gives us a graphic experience of the slave trade from the vantage point of the slaves themselves. The result is both a remarkable transatlantic view of the culture of enslavement, and a painful, intimate vision of the bloody, daily business of the slave trade.

Saltwater Slavery

Author: Stephanie E. Smallwood
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674030680
Size: 41.24 MB
Format: PDF
View: 7503
Download and Read
This bold, innovative book promises to radically alter our understanding of the Atlantic slave trade, and the depths of its horrors. Stephanie E. Smallwood offers a penetrating look at the process of enslavement from its African origins through the Middle Passage and into the American slave market. Saltwater Slavery is animated by deep research and gives us a graphic experience of the slave trade from the vantage point of the slaves themselves. The result is both a remarkable transatlantic view of the culture of enslavement, and a painful, intimate vision of the bloody, daily business of the slave trade.

Saltwater Slavery

Author: Stephanie E. Smallwood
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780674023499
Size: 80.34 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 901
Download and Read
This bold, innovative book promises to radically alter our understanding of the Atlantic slave trade, and the depths of its horrors. Stephanie E. Smallwood offers a penetrating look at the process of enslavement from its African origins through the Middle Passage and into the American slave market. Saltwater Slavery is animated by deep research and gives us a graphic experience of the slave trade from the vantage point of the slaves themselves. The result is both a remarkable transatlantic view of the culture of enslavement, and a painful, intimate vision of the bloody, daily business of the slave trade.

Many Middle Passages

Author: Emma Christopher
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520252071
Size: 72.52 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 3973
Download and Read
"Extends the concept of the Middle Passage to encompass the expropriation of people across other maritime and inland routes. No previous book has highlighted the diversity and centrality of middle passages, voluntary and involuntary, to modern global history."—Kenneth Morgan, author of Slavery and the British Empire "This volume extends the now well-established project of 'Atlantic World Studies' beyond its geographic and chronological frames to a genuinely global analysis of labour migration. It is a work of major importance that sparkles with new discoveries and insights."—Rick Halpern, co-editor of Empire and Others: British Encounters with Indigenous Peoples, 1600-1850

Exchanging Our Country Marks

Author: Michael A. Gomez
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 9780807861714
Size: 78.71 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 1106
Download and Read
The transatlantic slave trade brought individuals from diverse African regions and cultures to a common destiny in the American South. In this comprehensive study, Michael Gomez establishes tangible links between the African American community and its African origins and traces the process by which African populations exchanged their distinct ethnic identities for one defined primarily by the conception of race. He examines transformations in the politics, social structures, and religions of slave populations through 1830, by which time the contours of a new African American identity had begun to emerge. After discussing specific ethnic groups in Africa, Gomez follows their movement to North America, where they tended to be amassed in recognizable concentrations within individual colonies (and, later, states). For this reason, he argues, it is possible to identify particular ethnic cultural influences and ensuing social formations that heretofore have been considered unrecoverable. Using sources pertaining to the African continent as well as runaway slave advertisements, ex-slave narratives, and folklore, Gomez reveals concrete and specific links between particular African populations and their North American progeny, thereby shedding new light on subsequent African American social formation.

Central Africans Atlantic Creoles And The Foundation Of The Americas 1585 1660

Author: Linda M. Heywood
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521770653
Size: 43.65 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 7706
Download and Read
This book establishes Central Africa as the origin of most Africans brought to English and Dutch American colonies in North America, the Caribbean, and South America before 1660. It reveals that Central Africans were frequently possessors of an Atlantic Creole culture and places the movement of slaves and creation of the colonies within an Atlantic historical framework.

Black Slaves Indian Masters

Author: Barbara Krauthamer
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469607107
Size: 38.47 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 3735
Download and Read
Black Slaves, Indian Masters: Slavery, Emancipation, and Citizenship in the Native American South

Anthem

Author: Shana L. Redmond
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814789323
Size: 51.86 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 6292
Download and Read
For people of African descent, music constitutes a unique domain of expression. From traditional West African drumming to South African kwaito, from spirituals to hip-hop, Black life and history has been dynamically displayed and contested through sound. Shana Redmond excavates the sonic histories of these communities through a genre emblematic of Black solidarity and citizenship: anthems. An interdisciplinary cultural history, Anthem reveals how this “sound franchise” contributed to the growth and mobilization of the modern, Black citizen. Providing new political frames and aesthetic articulations for protest organizations and activist-musicians, Redmond reveals the anthem as a crucial musical form following World War I. Beginning with the premise that an analysis of the composition, performance, and uses of Black anthems allows for a more complex reading of racial and political formations within the twentieth century, Redmond expands our understanding of how and why diaspora was a formative conceptual and political framework of modern Black identity. By tracing key compositions and performances around the world—from James Weldon Johnson’s “Lift Ev’ry Voice and Sing” that mobilized the NAACP to Nina Simone’s “To Be Young, Gifted & Black” which became the Black National Anthem of the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE)—Anthem develops a robust recording of Black social movements in the twentieth century that will forever alter the way you hear race and nation.