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Saturn And How To Observe It

Author: Julius Benton
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 1846280451
Size: 30.99 MB
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Modern comprehensive review of the formation, astronomy, and structure of Saturn and its ring system, and observing techniques for amateurs Very latest detailed theories and physical descriptions How to observe and image the Saturn, its moon and ring, using a variety of telescope apertures and magnifications

The Observer S Guide To Planetary Motion

Author: Dominic Ford
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1493906291
Size: 14.90 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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To the naked eye, the most evident defining feature of the planets is their motion across the night sky. It was this motion that allowed ancient civilizations to single them out as different from fixed stars. “The Observer’s Guide to Planetary Motion” takes each planet and its moons (if it has them) in turn and describes how the geometry of the Solar System gives rise to its observed motions. Although the motions of the planets may be described as simple elliptical orbits around the Sun, we have to observe them from a particular vantage point: the Earth, which spins daily on its axis and circles around the Sun each year. The motions of the planets as observed relative to this spinning observatory take on more complicated patterns. Periodically, objects become prominent in the night sky for a few weeks or months, while at other times they pass too close to the Sun to be observed. “The Observer’s Guide to Planetary Motion” provides accurate tables of the best time for observing each planet, together with other notable events in their orbits, helping amateur astronomers plan when and what to observe. Uniquely each of the chapters includes extensive explanatory text, relating the events listed to the physical geometry of the Solar System. Along the way, many questions are answered: Why does Mars take over two years between apparitions (the times when it is visible from Earth) in the night sky, while Uranus and Neptune take almost exactly a year? Why do planets appear higher in the night sky when they’re visible in the winter months? Why do Saturn’s rings appear to open and close every 15 years? This book places seemingly disparate astronomical events into an understandable three-dimensional structure, enabling an appreciation that, for example, very good apparitions of Mars come around roughly every 15 years and that those in 2018 and 2035 will be nearly as good as that seen in 2003. Events are listed for the time period 2010-2030 and in the case of rarer events (such as eclipses and apparitions of Mars) even longer time periods are covered. A short closing chapter describes the seasonal appearance of deep sky objects, which follow an annual cycle as a result of Earth’s orbital motion around the Sun.

David Levy S Guide To The Night Sky

Author: David H. Levy
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521797535
Size: 62.39 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Inroduces beginners to amateur astronomy, describes what to look for and when--beginning with the solar system and moving on to the stars--and offers suggestions for better observations.

How To Use An Astronomical Telescope

Author: James Muirden
Publisher: Touchstone
ISBN: 9780671664046
Size: 47.87 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Astronomy has never been a more popular pastime than it is today. The increased availability of less expensive, more powerful, and more sophisticated telescopes has given rise to a new generation of stargazers. And for these beginning astronomers here is the comprehensive book covering everything from the difficult task of selecting an instrument to the equally daunting choices that arise when a telescope is turned to the heavens. Renowned British astronomer and author James Muirden takes the fledgling astronomer by the hand in his new book, offering tips on: * the purchase, assembly, and orientation of your new telescope * how to observe and chart the Sun, Moon, planets, stars and comets * how to investigate the deep-sky objects -- clusters, nebulae, and other galaxies beyond the Milky Way The final chapter, "Windows into Space," explores ten carefully selected regions featuring noteworthy examples of double stars, galaxies, and nebulae, as well as more obscure objects seldom examined by astronomers. How to Use an Astronomical Telescope offers completely revised and updated location charts with detailed coordinates, tables, appendixes, and numerous illustrations and photographs, making it the essential volume for one's first exploration of the cosmos.

The Planet Observer S Handbook

Author: Fred W. Price
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521789813
Size: 78.77 MB
Format: PDF
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Tells how to select a telescope; presents information on the history, characteristics, and observation of each of the planets; and includes advice on planetary photography.

Viewing And Imaging The Solar System

Author: Jane Clark
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1461451795
Size: 68.96 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Viewing and Imaging the Solar System: A Guide for Amateur Astronomers is for those who want to develop their ability to observe and image Solar System objects, including the planets and moons, the Sun, and comets and asteroids. They might be beginners, or they may have already owned and used an astronomical telescope for a year or more. Newcomers are almost always wowed by sights such as the rings of Saturn and the moons of Jupiter, but have little idea how to find these objects for themselves (with the obvious exceptions of the Sun and Moon). They also need guidance about what equipment, besides a telescope, they will need. This book is written by an expert on the Solar System, who has had a lot of experience with outreach programs, which teach others how to make the most of relatively simple and low-cost equipment. That does not mean that this book is not for serious amateurs. On the contrary, it is designed to show amateur astronomers, in a relatively light-hearted—and math-free way—how to become serious.

Herschel 400 Observing Guide

Author: Steve O'Meara
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521858939
Size: 33.10 MB
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Steve O'Meara's guide to the Herschel 400 for amateur astronomers.

Galileo And 400 Years Of Telescopic Astronomy

Author: Peter Grego
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 9781441955920
Size: 78.39 MB
Format: PDF
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In 1609 Galileo first used his telescope to kick start the science of observational astronomy - an event that proved to be of enormous historic, scientific, and cultural importance. Galileo and 400 Years of Telescopic Astronomy will feature the life and achievements of Galileo, around which has pivoted the story of four centuries of telescopic astronomy. The book will detail how astronomy has progressed through four centuries and contain glimpses of future space research and astronomy goals. Uniquely, interwoven with the text will be a range of practical projects for backyard astronomers in which to participate, projects that serve to illustrate many of Galileo's scientific discoveries.

Lunar Meteoroid Impacts And How To Observe Them

Author: Brian Cudnik
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 1441903240
Size: 41.94 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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The genesis of modern searches for observable meteoritic phenomena on the Moon is the paper by Lincoln La Paz in Popular Astronomy magazine in 1938. In it he argued that the absence of observed fashes of meteoritic impacts on the Moon might be interpreted to mean that these bodies are destroyed as luminous meteors in an extremely rarefed lunar atmosphere. The paper suggested the possibility of systematic searches for such possible lunar meteors. With these concepts in mind, I was surprised to note a transient moving bright speck on the Moon on July 10, 1941. It appeared to behave very much as a lunar meteor would – except that the poorly estimated duration would lead to a strongly hyperbolic heliocentric velocity. Thus, the idea of systematic searches for both p- sible lunar meteors and meteoritic impact fashes was born. It was appreciated that much time might need to be expended to achieve any positive results. Systematic searches were carried out by others and myself chiefy in the years 1945–1965 and became a regular program at the newly founded Association of Lunar and Planetary Observers, or ALPO.