Download schooling citizens the struggle for african american education in antebellum america in pdf or read schooling citizens the struggle for african american education in antebellum america in pdf online books in PDF, EPUB and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to get schooling citizens the struggle for african american education in antebellum america in pdf book now. This site is like a library, Use search box in the widget to get ebook that you want.



Schooling Citizens

Author: Hilary J. Moss
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226542513
Size: 23.93 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 5400
Download and Read
While white residents of antebellum Boston and New Haven forcefully opposed the education of black residents, their counterparts in slaveholding Baltimore did little to resist the establishment of African American schools. Such discrepancies, Hilary Moss argues, suggest that white opposition to black education was not a foregone conclusion. Through the comparative lenses of these three cities, she shows why opposition erupted where it did across the United States during the same period that gave rise to public education. As common schooling emerged in the 1830s, providing white children of all classes and ethnicities with the opportunity to become full-fledged citizens, it redefined citizenship as synonymous with whiteness. This link between school and American identity, Moss argues, increased white hostility to black education at the same time that it spurred African Americans to demand public schooling as a means of securing status as full and equal members of society. Shedding new light on the efforts of black Americans to learn independently in the face of white attempts to withhold opportunity, Schooling Citizens narrates a previously untold chapter in the thorny history of America’s educational inequality.

Education And Social Change

Author: John L. Rury
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 131749735X
Size: 29.30 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 2663
Download and Read
This brief, interpretive history of American schooling focuses on the evolving relationship between education and social change. Like its predecessors, this new edition adopts a thematic approach, investigating the impact of social forces such as industrialization, urbanization, immigration, globalization, and cultural conflict on the development of schools and other educational institutions. It also examines the various ways that schools have contributed to social change, particularly in enhancing the status and accomplishments of certain social groups and not others. Detailed accounts of the experiences of women and minority groups in American history consider how their lives have been affected by education, while "Focal Point" sections within each chapter allow the reader to hone in on key moments in history and their relevance within the broader scope of American schooling from the colonial era to the present. This new edition has been comprehensively updated and edited for greater readability and clarity. It offers a revised final chapter, updated to include recent change in education politics and policy, in particular the decline of No Child Left Behind and the impact of the Common Core and movements against it. Further additions include enhanced coverage of colonial and early post-colonial American schooling, added materials on persistent issues such as race in education, an updated discussion of the GED program, and a closer look at the role of technology in schools. With its nuanced treatment of both historical and contemporary factors influencing the modern school system, this book remains an excellent resource for investigating and critiquing the social, economic, and cultural development of American education.

Moral Minorities And The Making Of American Democracy

Author: Kyle G. Volk
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199371938
Size: 49.44 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 521
Download and Read
Should the majority always rule? If not, how should the rights of minorities be protected? In Moral Minorities and the Making of American Democracy, Kyle G. Volk unearths the origins of modern ideas and practices of minority-rights politics. Focusing on controversies spurred by the explosion of grassroots moral reform in the early nineteenth century, he shows how a motley but powerful array of self-understood minorities reshaped American democracy as they battled laws regulating Sabbath observance, alcohol, and interracial contact. Proponents justified these measures with the "democratic" axiom of majority rule. In response, immigrants, black northerners, abolitionists, liquor dealers, Catholics, Jews, Seventh-day Baptists, and others articulated a different vision of democracy requiring the protection of minority rights. These moral minorities prompted a generation of Americans to reassess whether "majority rule" was truly the essence of democracy, and they ensured that majority tyranny would no longer be just the fear of elites and slaveholders. Beginning in the mid-nineteenth-century, minority rights became the concern of a wide range of Americans attempting to live in an increasingly diverse nation. Volk reveals that driving this vast ideological reckoning was the emergence of America's tradition of popular minority-rights politics. To challenge hostile laws and policies, moral minorities worked outside of political parties and at the grassroots. They mobilized elite and ordinary people to form networks of dissent and some of America's first associations dedicated to the protection of minority rights. They lobbied officials and used constitutions and the common law to initiate "test cases" before local and appellate courts. Indeed, the moral minorities of the mid-nineteenth century pioneered fundamental methods of political participation and legal advocacy that subsequent generations of civil-rights and civil-liberties activists would adopt and that are widely used today.

Building A New Educational State

Author: Joan Malczewski
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022639462X
Size: 43.87 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 2490
Download and Read
Joan Malczewski investigates the relationship in postwar America between northern philanthropies and southern states, exploring how education reform did or did not come about and, by extension, how state and local systems developed in response. Highly attuned to foundations limitations in this time, Malczewski focuses on the ways that the state as an actor enabled or inhibited different foundation initiatives. She zeroes in on Mississippi and North Carolina, which had different objectives and thus had distinct relationships with northern foundations. These state responses illuminate the interrelationships among institutions with varying capacities to set agendas, or to effect or resist change."

The Role Of Female Seminaries On The Road To Social Justice For Women

Author: Kristen Welch
Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers
ISBN: 1630877506
Size: 44.71 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 4403
Download and Read
In the United States, female seminaries and their antecedents, the female academies, were crucial first institutions that played a vital role in liberating women from the "home sphere," a locus that was the primary domain of Euro-American women. The female seminaries founded by Native Americans and African Americans had different founding rationales but also played a key role in empowering women. On the whole, the initial intent of these schools was to prepare women for their proper role in American society as wives and mothers. An unintended effect, however, was to prepare women for the first socially accepted profession for women: teaching. Thus equipped, women played a crucial role in the development of American education at all levels while achieving varying degrees of social justice for themselves and other groups through engagement in the reform movements of their times--including women's suffrage, abolition, temperance, and mental health reform. By recapturing the role religion played in shaping education for women, Welch and Ruelas offer a refreshing take on history that draws on several primary texts and details more than one hundred female seminaries and academies opened in the United States.

The African American Years

Author: Gabriel Stepto
Publisher: Charles Scribner's Sons
ISBN: 9780684312576
Size: 59.34 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 770
Download and Read
Detailing year-by-year the African-American experience, this title provides a chronology that traces the history of African Americans from pre-Colonial times to the present. Included are essays offering overviews of key events and themes--such as the Atlantic slave trade, civil rights and the black experience in the 1990s--as well as primary source documents, including poems, memoirs, legal documents and other materials that help illuminate African-American history.